American Chemical Society National Meeting Press Conference Schedule

Released: 25-Aug-2011 1:00 PM EDT
Embargo expired: 1-Sep-2011 11:00 AM EDT
Source Newsroom: American Chemical Society (ACS)
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EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Thursday, Sept. 1, 11 a.m., Eastern Time

American Chemical Society National Meeting, Aug. 28-Sept. 1, 2011


Press Conference Schedule
Attend in Person in Denver or Access Live Audio & Video Online

242nd ACS National Meeting & Exposition
ACS Press Center
Colorado Convention Center, Rooms 210/212
Press Center Phone: 303-228-8532

See Instructions* below for joining live briefings from remote locations at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/acslive

ALL TOPICS ARE STRICTLY EMBARGOED FOR THE TIMES INDICATED. NOTE THAT SOME PRESS BRIEFINGS TAKE PLACE BEFORE THE EMBARGO TIME,
INDICATED BY **

Sunday, August 28


Controlling cells’ environments: A step toward building much-needed tissues and organs
8:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 4:40 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

With stem cells so fickle and indecisive that they make Shakespeare’s Hamlet pale by comparison, scientists today described an advance in encouraging stem cells to make decisions about their fate. The technology for doing so is a step toward using stem cells in “regenerative medicine” — to grow from scratch organs for transplants and tissues for treating diseases.

Laura L. Kiessling, Ph.D., is with the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Nano-thermometers show first temperature response differences in living cells
11 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 4 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Using a modern version of open-wide-and-keep-this-under-your-tongue, scientists today reported taking the temperature of individual cells in the human body and finding for the first time that temperatures inside do not adhere to the familiar 98.6 degree Fahrenheit norm.

Haw Yang, Ph.D., is with Princeton University.

Remedies for science’s shortage of superheroes
Noon MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 11 a.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

One of the most serious personnel shortages in the global science and engineering workforce — numbering more than 20 million in the United States alone — involves a scarcity of real-life versions of Superman, Superwoman and other superheroes and superheroines with charm, charisma, people skills and communication skills. That’s the premise behind an unusual symposium occurring here today.

Jennifer Larese is NOVA Outreach Coordinator.
Janet English is an instructor at El Toro High School, Mission Viejo, Calif.
John Cohen, M.D., is with the University of Colorado School of Medicine.
Kishore Hari is Director of the Bay Area Science Festival.
Marc Abrahams is editor of Annals of Improbable Research.
Donna J. Nelson, Ph.D., is organizer of the symposium and is with University of Oklahoma and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


A new skin test for determining age of wild animals
1 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 10:30 a.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

A special skin test can determine the age of wild animals while they are still alive, providing information needed to control population explosions among nuisance animals.

Randal Stahl, Ph.D., is with the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo.

Filling the pantry for the first voyages to the Red Planet
1:30 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 5:30 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

A green thumb and a little flair as a gourmet chef may be among the key skills for the first men and women who travel to the Red Planet later this century, according to a scientist who reported here today on preparations for the first manned missions to Mars.

Maya R. Cooper is with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

Friend and foe: Nitrogen pollution’s little-known environmental and human health threats
11:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 7:30 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

Billions of people owe their lives to nitrogen fertilizers — a pillar of the fabled Green Revolution in agriculture that averted global famine in the 20th century — but few are aware that nitrogen pollution from fertilizers and other sources has become a major environmental problem that threatens human health and welfare in multiple ways.

Alan R. Townsend, Ph.D., is with the University of Colorado, Boulder.

New ‘Heroes of Chemistry’ are pioneers in personalized medicine and decoding genes
3 p.m. MT— EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE:  Sunday, Aug. 28, 12:01 a.m. EDT
Note to journalists:  Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

The American Chemical Society bestows its Heroes of Chemistry Awards on three scientists. Two developed a new drug that helped pioneer the era of “personalized medicine” for cancer patients, an approach in which one-size-fits-all drugs yield to medicines customized to the genetic endowment of individual patients. Another invented today’s predominant technology for genetic sequencing, deciphering the genetic blueprint in the DNA that makes up the genes of living things.

Keith H. Gibson, Ph.D., retired, was formerly with AstraZeneca.
Andrew J. Barker, Ph.D., is with AstraZeneca.
George L. Trainor, Ph.D., retired, was formerly with DuPont and is now an independent pharmaceutical consultant.

Hollywood screenwriters and scientists: More than an artistic collaboration
4:30 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 3 p.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

In this International Year of Chemistry (IYC), writers and producers for the most popular crime and science-related television shows and movies are putting out an all-points bulletin for scientists to advise them on the accuracy of their plots involving lab tests, crime scenes, etc., and to even give them story ideas.

Aaron Thomas is writer, producer, for CSI New York.
Corrine Marrinan is writer, producer for CSI.
Jane Espenson is writer, producer for a variety of television shows.
Donna Nelson, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Chemistry, the University of Oklahoma and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and scientific adviser to Breaking Bad.
Ann Merchant is with The Science & Entertainment Exchange.

Monday, August 29


Innovation Task Force Report unveiled
9:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Monday, Aug. 29, 11:30 a.m., EDT

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, will unveil a landmark report on creating new jobs and growing the economy. The report details steps to create economic growth, generate revenue and add new jobs in one of our nation’s most valuable scientific exports: chemistry and the chemical enterprise.

Joseph S. Francisco, Ph.D., is ACS Immediate Past President and William E. Moore Distinguished Professor of Earth and Atmospheric Science and Chemistry, Purdue University.
Task Force Chair George Whitesides, Ph.D., is Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Harvard University.
Robert H. Grubbs, Ph.D., is 2005 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry, Victor and Elizabeth Atkins Professor of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena.
Michael Lefenfeld, Ph.D., is founder, CEO, and Chief Scientific Officer, SiGNa Chemistry.
Patrick N. Confalone, Ph.D., is a member of the ACS Board of Directors and Vice-President, Global R&D, Crop Protection, DuPont.

Tropical fruits symposium
10:15 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Monday, Aug. 29, 3:30 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Three experts will discuss the value of a number of tropical fruits –– some exotic–– as part of a healthy diet and as tools in fighting disease.

Putting the squeeze on fruit with “pascalization” boosts healthful antioxidant levels:
Carmen Hernandez-Brenes, Ph.D., is with the Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technologico de Monterrey, Monterrey, Mexico.
Palestine sweet lime fights colon cancer:
Bhimanagouda Patil, Ph.D., is with Texas A &M University.
Benefits of ficus-indica fruits:
Gerold Jertz, Ph.D., is with Analytical Flavor Research, Symrise AG, Holzminden, Germanyhealth.

Panda poop may be a treasure trove of microbes for making biofuels
11 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Monday, Aug. 29, 11:30 a.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

Panda poop contains bacteria with potent effects in breaking down plant material in the way needed to tap biomass as a major new source of “biofuels” produced not from corn and other food sources, but from grass, wood chips and crop wastes.

Ashli Brown, Ph.D., is with Mississippi State University.



The first nuclear power plants for settlements on the Moon & Mars
11:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 5 p.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

The first nuclear power plant being considered for production of electricity for manned or unmanned bases on the Moon, Mars and other planets may really look like it came from outer space

James E. Werner is with the Idaho National Laboratory.

Highlights of reports on sustainability and green chemistry
12:15 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 8:30 a.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Eric Davidson, Ph.D., is with Woods Hole Research Center. He presents at the Nitrogen and the Human Endeavor Symposium presentation.
Vivian Faye McNeill, Ph.D., is with Columbia University. She is a co-organizer of the symposium, Atmospheric Aerosols: Chemistry, Clouds, and Climate, which is focused on the mitigating effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate change. 
Ronald Cohen, Ph.D., is with the University of California, Berkeley. He developed the theme of Chemistry of Air, Space, and Water for the meeting.

Mysteries of ozone depletion continue 25 years after the discovery of the Antarctic ozone hole
1 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Monday, August 29, 7:35 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

Even after many decades of studying ozone and its loss from our atmosphere miles above the Earth, plenty of mysteries and surprises remain, including an unexpected loss of ozone over the Arctic this past winter. That is the subject of the noted Kavli Foundation Innovations in Chemistry Lecture.

Susan Solomon, Ph.D., is with the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo.


Tackling mysteries about carbon, possible oil formation and more deep inside Earth
2 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Sunday, Aug. 28, 6:00 p.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

How do diamonds the size of potatoes shoot up at 40 miles per hour from their birthplace 100 miles below Earth’s surface? Does a secret realm of life exist inside the Earth? Is there more oil and natural gas than anyone dreams, with oil forming not from the remains of ancient fossilized plants and animals near the surface, but naturally deep, deep down there? Can the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide, be transformed into a pure solid mineral? Those are among the mysteries being tackled in a real-life version of the science fiction classic, A Journey to the Center of the Earth.

Russell J. Hemley, Ph.D., is with the Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, D.C.

What’s really in that luscious chocolate aroma?
2:45 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Monday, Aug. 29, 1:20 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

The mouth-watering aroma of cocoa powder — key ingredient for chocolate — emerges from substances in cocoa that individually smell like potato chips, cooked meat, peaches, raw beef fat, cooked cabbage, human sweat, earth, cucumber, honey and an improbable palate of other distinctly un-cocoa-like aromas.

Peter H. Schieberle, Ph.D., is with Technical University of Munich, Bavaria, Germany.

Tuesday, August 30


A “nano”, environmentally friendly, and low toxicity flame retardant protects fabric
8:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 12:25 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

The technology in “fire paint” used to protect steel beams in buildings and other structures has found a new life as a first-of-its-kind flame retardant for children’s cotton sleepwear, terrycloth bathrobes and other apparel. Flame retardants are used on cotton, the most popular fabric in the world, because it can catch fire easily and burns rapidly with a hot flame.

Jaime C. Grunlan, Ph.D., is with Texas A&M University.

Unfounded pesticide concerns adversely affect the health of low-income populations
10 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Tuesday, Aug. 30, 5:50 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

The increasingly prevalent notion that expensive organic fruits and vegetables are safer because pesticides — used to protect traditional crops from insects, thus ensuring high crop yields and making them less expensive — are a risk for causing cancer has no good scientific support. Such unfounded fears could have the unanticipated consequence of keeping healthful fruits and vegetables from those with low incomes.

Bruce N. Ames, Ph.D., is with Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, Calif.

Epic search for evidence of life on Mars heats up with focus on high-tech instruments
12:15 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Tuesday, Aug. 30, 10:30 a.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

Scientists are expressing confidence that questions about life on Mars, which has captured human imagination for centuries, finally may be answered, thanks in part to new life-detection tools up to 1,000 times more sensitive than previous instruments.

Jeffrey Bada, Ph.D., is with the University of California-San Diego.
Mark Allen, Ph.D., is with the California Institute of Technology.
Daniel Glavin, Ph.D., is with NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.


New tests for “legal marijuana,” “bath salts” and other emerging designer drugs
1:15 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Tuesday, Aug. 30, 6 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

Scientists report development of much needed new tests to help cope with a wave of deaths, emergency room visits and other problems from a new genre of designer drugs sold legally in stores and online that mimic the effects of cocaine, ecstasy and marijuana.

Oliver Sutcliffe, Ph.D., is with Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy & Biomedical Sciences, Glasgow, Scotland.
Robert Lantz, Ph.D., is with Rocky Mountain Instrumental Laboratories, Ft. Collins, Colo.

Wednesday, August 31


A step toward a saliva test for cancer
8:30 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 1:35 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

A new saliva test can measure the amount of potential carcinogens stuck to a person’s DNA — interfering with the action of genes involved in health and disease — and could lead to a commercial test to help determine risks for cancer and other diseases. The test measures the amount of damaged DNA in a person’s body.

Hauh-Jyun Candy Chen, Ph.D., is with National Chung Cheng University, Republic of China.

Cutting soot emissions: Fastest, most economical way to slow global warming
10 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 3:30 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

A new study of dust-like particles of soot in the air — now emerging as the second most important — but previously overlooked — factor in global warming provides fresh evidence that reducing soot emissions from diesel engines and other sources could slow melting of sea ice in the Arctic faster and more economically than any other quick fix.

Mark Z. Jacobson, Ph.D., is with Stanford University.

“Plastic bottle” solution for arsenic contaminated water threatening 100 million people
11 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 8 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

With almost 100 million people in developing countries exposed to dangerously high levels of arsenic in their drinking water, and unable to afford complex purification technology, there is now a simple, inexpensive method for removing arsenic based on chopped up pieces of ordinary plastic beverage bottles coated with a nutrient found in many foods and dietary supplements.

Tsanangurayi Tongesayi, Ph.D., is with Monmouth University, West Long Branch, N.J.

Feeding cows natural plant extracts can reduce dairy farm odors and feed costs
11:45 a.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Thursday, Sept. 1, 4:10 p.m., EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

With citizens’ groups seeking government regulation of foul-smelling ammonia emissions from large dairy farms, scientists report that adding natural plant extracts to cow feed can reduce levels of the gas by one-third while reducing the need to fortify cow feed with expensive protein supplements.

Matias J. Aguerre is with the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Potatoes reduce blood pressure in people with obesity and high blood pressure
12:15 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 5:50 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

The potato’s stereotype as a fattening food for health-conscious folks to avoid is getting another revision today as scientists report that just a couple servings of spuds a day reduces blood pressure almost as much as oatmeal without causing weight gain.

Joe Vinson, Ph.D., is with the University of Scranton.

Not tonight deer: A new birth control vaccine helps reduce urban deer damage
12:45 p.m. MT — EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE: Wednesday, Aug. 31, 12:25 p.m. EDT
Note to journalists: Please report that this research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society

A new birth control vaccine for white-tailed deer — a growing nuisance in urban areas for gardens and landscaping — eliminates the dangerous reproductive behavior behind the annual autumn surge in automobile-deer collisions. The vaccine is just becoming commercially available in some states.

David Goldade is with the National Wildlife Research Center, Fort Collins, Colo.

*Instructions for joining chat room sessions
Chat Room Sessions from ACS National Meeting in Denver

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Office of Public Affairs is offering the news media the opportunity to join press briefings, whether covering the meeting onsite or from a remote location. This format will provide access for the increasing number of journalists who cover scientific meetings from their home base during ACS’ 242nd National Meeting, held Aug. 28-Sept.1 in Denver.

Borrowing the popular chat room concept from the Internet, we will provide news media with access to both real and virtual chat room sessions during the Denver meeting.

Reporters attending the meeting can gather with scientists in an informal setting in our Press Briefing Room at the ACS Press Center, Room 210/212, at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver. The Scientists will summarize their research and field questions. Offsite reporters can enter a virtual version of this Chat Room over the Internet. In addition to seeing and hearing the real-world activity, offsite reporters can submit questions.

Like hosts of a traditional chat room, we never know how many participants will join a session. Each session will proceed, regardless of attendance, so that digital transcripts can be made and posted online as a resource for individuals who are unable to attend.

Chat Room sessions begin at 10:30 a.m., Eastern Time, on Sunday, Aug. 28, and continue during the week. Get a head start by registering at Ustream.tv, a live, interactive online video site.

ACS’ Virtual Press Conference room

To register with Ustream.tv, go to http://ustream.tv/sign-up-step-1. It’s free and only takes a minute or two to sign up. To join the chat room during one of our sessions, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/acslive and click the “Login” button at the top right of the Ustream window. Ustream requires the latest version of Adobe Flash, which can be downloaded without charge here.

Use the built-in chat box to ask questions during the press conference (requires Ustream.tv registration).

Use the chat box to the right of the video window to submit questions to the researchers. To resolve connection problems, contact Adam Dylewski (a_dylewski@acs.org) or Mike Woods (m_woods@acs.org). Recorded versions of the sessions will be available at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/acslive after the press conference is complete.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society contact newsroom@acs.org.

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