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Science

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Language, Language acquisition, Language Development, Bi Lingual, Spanish, Child Development, English, Multilingual, multilingual environments

In Young Bilingual Children Two Languages Develop Simultaneously but Independently

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A new study of Spanish-English bilingual children finds that when children learn any two languages from birth each language proceeds on its own independent course, at a rate that reflects the quality of the children’s exposure to each language.

Life

Pop Culture

Channels:

Language, Words

It’s Not Love, It’s Not Hate—It’s Just ‘Like’

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Professor researches how we use the word "like."

Life

Education

Channels:

Neuman, Literacy, Language, Learning, Education, Educational Research, Education Research, NYU, NYU Steinhardt, NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

A Double Dose of Disadvantage: Low-Income Children Missing Out on Language Learning Both at Home and at School

Children from poor neighborhoods are less likely to have complex language building opportunities both in home and at school, putting them at a disadvantage in their kindergarten year, finds a new study led by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.

Medicine

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Lung Cancer

Language, Cultural Norms Clash with Optimal Care for Some Asian-Americans

Mona Jung’s father had an attitude of quiet resignation to lung cancer — especially when it came to the side effects of his treatment. When nausea and fatigue overwhelmed him, he said nothing. When hunger eluded him, he played the tough guy. Yet, when Elvis Ngai Kwan went to visit his oncologist he painted a positive picture of his health.

Science

Channels:

Optometry, color terminology, Lexicon, Language evolution

Why Don’t Americans Have a Name for the Color “Light Blue?”

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“Mizu” translates to “water” and has emerged in recent decades as a unique shade in the Japenese lexicon, new research has found. Color terminology varies widely from country to country, and the U.S. and Japan have many different colors for which they have specific words.

Medicine

Channels:

Voice Center, Vocal Cord, Vocal, Voice, Singing, Music Students, Otolaryngology, Otolaryngologist, laryngologist, Nodules, Throat, Inflammation, Reflux, Performance, vocal anatomy, Screenings, Voice Disorders

Voice Center Offers Screenings to Students Pursuing Singing Careers

This recent Saturday clinic, at which 11 students were examined, was part of an annual free screening the UAB Voice Center offers to students in the voice program, part of the UAB College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of Music.

Life

Education

Channels:

Dialects, Research, Linguistics, speech and language, National Science Foundation (NSF)

Talking Twang: Study Examines How Dialect Impacts Learning in Appalachian Classrooms

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A new West Virginia University study examines differences in students’ dialects across the state and how perceptions of dialect differences shape their educational experiences.

Life

Education

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Linguistics, English, Appalachia, Education

Talking Twang

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As Appalachian dialects continue to change in the 21st century, West Virginia teens are altering their speech patterns to build their own identities. A new West Virginia University study examines differences in students’ dialects across the state and how perceptions of dialect differences shape their educational experiences.

Science

Channels:

University of Vienna, Language, Physics, Linguistics, Interdisciplinary diffusion, Globalization, Katharina Prochazka, Gero Vogl , language shift, Carinthia, PNAS

Why Do People Switch Their Language?

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Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favour of another, a phenomenon called language shift. Katharina Prochazka and Gero Vogl from the University of Vienna have studied why language shift happens using the example of southern Carinthia, Austria. Making use of methods originally developed in diffusion physics to study the motion of atoms, they built a model for the spread and retreat of languages over time and space. With this model, they were able to show that interaction with other speakers is the main factor influencing whether language shift occurs. The interdisciplinary study is published in the journal PNAS.

Life

Education

Channels:

English Language, history of english language, Linguistics, Language

Study Reveals the English Language Organized Itself

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A Stony Brook University-led study of the history and spelling of English suffixes demonstrates that the spelling of English words is more orderly and self-organized that linguistics have previously thought.







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