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Marine Science

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Science

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Climate Change, ocean acidifcation, Global Warming, increased co2, Marine Biology, Food Webs

Ocean Warming to Cancel Increased CO2-Driven Productivity

University of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity.

Medicine

Science

Business

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Dna Bar Coding, seafood fraud, Conservation And Marine Biology

GW Study Finds 33 Percent of Seafood Sold in Six DC Eateries Mislabeled

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Scientists at the George Washington University used a powerful genetic technique to test seafood dinners sold in six District restaurants and found 33 percent had been mislabeled.

Science

Channels:

Climate Change, alage, global warmin, Science, Atmoshperic

Breaking Climate Change Research (Embargoed) Shows Global Warming Making Oceans More Toxic

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Climate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences entitled, “Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans,” demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.

Science

Business

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Utrafast Imaging, Smallest Transistor, Electronic Cyclones, Sensor-Filled Glove, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Science

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Climate Change, Delta, Coast, Mississippi River, Marshes

Research Sheds New Light on Forces That Threaten Sensitive Coastlines

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Wind-driven expansion of marsh ponds on the Mississippi River Delta is a significant factor in the loss of crucial land in the Delta region, according to research by scientists at Indiana University and North Carolina State University. The study found that 17 percent of land loss in the area resulted from pond expansion.

Science

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Evolution, Marine Mammals, Dolphin, Sex, Marine Biodiversity

An Intimate Look at the Mechanics of Dolphin Sex

Using CT scans, researchers visualize the internal dynamics of sexual intercourse in marine mammals. The research sheds light on evolutionary forces and has practical applications for conservation efforts.

Medicine

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Tulane Univeristy, Tulane, Sea Level Rise, Climate Change

Tulane Expert Available to Discuss Climate Change Ahead of March for Science

Science

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oil, Oil Spill, BP, Gulf Of Mexico, Environmental Impact, Environment, Deepwater Horizon, Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, EPA, NOAA

BP Oil Spill Did $17.2 Billion in Damage to Natural Resources, Scientists Find in First-Ever Financial Evaluation of Spill’s Impact

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The 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill did $17.2 billion in damage to the natural resources in the Gulf of Mexico, a team of scientists recently found after a six-year study of the impact of the largest oil spill in U.S. history.

Science

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Climate Change, Nitrogen Cycle, Ocean, Marine Biology, Food Web, Greenhouse Gas

Rising Water Temperatures Endanger Health of Coastal Ecosystems, Study Finds

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Increasing water temperatures are responsible for the accumulation of a chemical called nitrite in marine environments throughout the world, a symptom of broader changes in normal ocean biochemical pathways that could ultimately disrupt ocean food webs.

Science

Channels:

polluted water, Chesapeake Bay, Chesapeake oysters, Environment

Chesapeake Bay Pollution Extends to Early 19th Century

Humans began measurably and negatively impacting water quality in the Chesapeake Bay in the first half of the 19th century, according to a study of eastern oysters by researchers at The University of Alabama.







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