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Exercise and Fitness

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Medicine

Science

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Parents Grade Themselves, Signals from Fat, Getting Teens to Exercise, and More in the Obesity News Source

Click here to go directly to Newswise's Obesity News Source

Medicine

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Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular, Cardiovascular Disease, Diet, Cholesterol, Exercise, Family History, Heart Attack, Heart Health, Heart Health Month, Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup, Prevention, Stress, Weight Management

Mayo Clinic National Health Checkup Shows African-Americans Significantly More Concerned About Heart Health

A new survey by Mayo Clinic revealed that more than two-thirds of African-Americans are concerned about their heart health (71 percent), which is significantly more than Caucasian (41 percent) or Hispanic (37 percent) respondents. Respondents from the South (51 percent) were also significantly more likely to express concern than those in the Northeast (39 percent) or West (35 percent).

Science

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UF/IFAS Helps ‘Keep the (Blood) Pressure Down’

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New UF/IFAS Extension program aims to help people around Florida maintain healthy blood pressure.

Medicine

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Fragile X Syndrome, Steven Tyler's Janie's Fund Wins Big, Untreated Water Making Our Kids Sick, and More in the Children's Health News Source

Click here for the latest research and features on Children's Health.

Medicine

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Obestiy, Teenagers, Teens, Exercise, Physical Activity, physical activity counseling, pediatric psychology, Health Promotion, Exercise Motivation

Getting Inside Teens’ Heads: Study Upsets Beliefs About Feelings and Exercise Probability

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A pilot study tracking adolescents’ internal psychological states and physical activity in near real-time challenges prevailing assumptions about how to increase physical activity.

Medicine

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ACSM, American College of Sports Medicine, Low Birth Weight, Health, Fitness, Obesity

Are Low Birth-Weight Babies Prone to Lead Physically Inactive Lives?

Latest Research Highlights from ACSM

Medicine

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Is Running Really Good for the Heart?

From the Broad Street Run here in Philadelphia to the Cherry Blossom 10-mile run in Washington, DC, and others across the country and overseas, running season is just around the corner! And for many people, from avid runners to weekend warriors, that means it’s almost time to lace up your shoes and dust off those training plans. But, recent news stories about runners suffering sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and other heart-related complications mid-race might leave some wondering if there may actually be a risk to running.

Medicine

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Heart, Healthy Heart, Healthy heart tips, Valentine's Day, February Heart Month, Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, sodium consumption, Cholesterol, High Cholesterol, exercise and heart, heart medications, stress and the heart, UCLA Health System, UCLA Cardiology

Give Your Heart a Healthy Valentine’s Day Gift

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While boxes of decadent chocolates treats, celebratory champagne and romantic high-calorie dinners may dance in your mind as a way to celebrate Valentine’s Day, your heart may be pining for something else. With Valentine's Day just around the corner, it is a great time to look at the state of your heart. “Despite recent progress, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States," said Dr. Sheila Sahni, interventional cardiology fellow at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and UCLA Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Health Program. “Making heart healthy lifestyle choices and taking control of your cardiovascular risk factors can help prevent or slow the progression of heart disease.” Every day decisions are important to cardiovascular health, she adds, and Valentine’s Day is a good time to give yourself the gift of lifestyle changes that will benefit you through the year. Check out these tips.

Medicine

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High-Intensity Interval Training

Exercise for Anyone, Anytime: Researchers Find Brief, Intense Stair Climbing Is a Practical Way to Boost Fitness

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There are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers at McMaster University have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health. The findings negate the two most common excuses of couch potatoes: no time and no access to the gym.

Medicine

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Sitting Not Linked to Incident Diabetes

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Sitting may not be as deadly as previously thought, with new research led by the University of Sydney ruling out sitting as a direct cause of diabetes.

Medicine

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PRISE Study, PRISE, protein pacing, Dr. Paul Arciero

Diet Quality, Improves Fitness Among the Fittest

In two recent peer-reviewed papers published by Nutrients and Growth Hormone and IGF-1 Research, Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero and colleagues report proven benefits of consuming moderate amounts of protein regularly throughout the day (protein-pacing) combined with a multi-dimensional exercise regimen that includes resistance exercise, interval sprint exercise, stretching and endurance exercise.

Medicine

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Physiatry, Physiatrist, AAP, Association of Academic Physiatrists, Medicine, Research, Running, Doctor, Physician, Health, Medical, Runners

Do Foot and Tibia Angles Affect Loading Impact Rates in Runners?

Running is one of the most popular forms of fitness. Despite numerous health advantages, running injuries are common with incidence rates ranging from 19.4 to 79.3 percent. Foot strike patterns have been a topic of debate with regards to injury risk in runners. Foot strike patterns are typically separated into three categories: rearfoot strike, where the runner’s heel hits the ground first; midfoot strike, where the runner’s foot lands flat; and forefoot strike, where the runner’s ball of the foot lands on the ground first.

Medicine

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Medical, Medicine, Doctor, Physician, Health, Healthcare, Runners, Physiatry, Physiatrist, AAP, Association of Academic Physiatrists, Las Vegas, Conference, Research

Runners: Protect Your Legs with Fewer Distractions

Runners who encounter visual and auditory distractions may be more likely to sustain leg injuries, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Las Vegas.

Medicine

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Medical, Medicine, Health, Healthcare, Doctor, Physician, Physiatry, AAP, Association of Academic Physiatrists, Nonprofit, Association, Conference, Las Vegas, Muscles, Exercise

Quadricep Strength and Speed of Force Affects Knee Osteoarthritis

Quadricep strength and speed of force production (SFP) both affect physical functioning in people with, or at risk for, knee osteoarthritis, according to research presented this week at the Association of Academic Physiatrists Annual Meeting in Las Vegas.

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Professor's Football Research Emphasizes Lower Extremity Loading Patterns, Torque Production and Velocity-Based Resistance Training

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Medicine

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concussion and soccer ball heading, concussion and heading, concussion and soccer, Concussion, head impacts and soccer ball heading, Traumatic Head Injury

Soccer Ball Heading May Commonly Cause Concussion Symptoms

Frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under recognized cause of concussion symptoms, according to a study of amateur players led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers. The findings run counter to earlier soccer studies suggesting concussion injuries mainly result from inadvertent head impacts, such as collisions with other players or a goalpost. The study was published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicine

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physical activity and weight control, Obesity, Exercise, Physical Activity, BMI

Loyola Study Provides New Evidence That Exercise Is Not Key to Weight Control

An international study led by Loyola University Chicago is providing compelling new evidence that exercise may not be the key to controlling weight. Neither physical activity nor sedentary time were associated with weight gain. The study is published in the journal PeerJ.

Medicine

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Physiology, Heat Stress, Heat Exposure, Hyperthermia, Exercise capacity, Exercise Physiology, Exercise, Blood Flow

Whole-Body Heat Stress Lowers Exercise Capacity, Blood Flow in Men

Researchers have found that prolonged exposure to high temperatures can raise both the skin and core temperature, reducing blood flow to the brain and limbs during exercise and limiting the ability to exercise for long periods. The study, the first of its kind to separate the effects of skin- versus internal-raised temperature (hyperthermia), is published in Physiological Reports.

Medicine

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Super Bowl foods, Calorie Literacy, Exercise Equivalents

Super Bowl 2017 "Big Game" Calorie Costs in Exercise

Director of the New York City Food Policy Center at HUNTER College Dr. Charles Platkin Shows Big Game Activities to Burn off Foods You Just Ate - Is it Splurge-worthy? Since a calorie doesn’t mean much to the average person, the idea is to use exercise equivalents to provide a frame of reference that is familiar and meaningful and thus help improve calorie literacy.

Medicine

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Metabolism, sanford burnham prebys, Dr. Muthu Periasamy, Cold Weather, Obesity, Diabetes, sarcolipin

Brrrr...it's WINTER. Can Being Cold Really Help You Burn Calories and Slim Down? An #SBP Researcher Weighs In







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