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Suicide Attempts, Suicide Awareness and Prevention, Teenage suicide, same-sex marriage, Sexual Orientation

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Surgeons, Patients, rude behavior, disrespectful behavior, Surgical Complications, patient complaints, william cooper, Vanderbilt Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy, Gerald Hickson, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, patient advocacy, Patient Advocacy Reporting System , Roger Dmochowski, Vanderbilt Health System, JAMA Surgery, National Surgi

Patient Complaints Can Identify Surgeons with Higher Rates of Bad Surgical Outcomes

Recording and analyzing patient and family reports about rude and disrespectful behavior can identify surgeons with higher rates of surgical site infections and other avoidable adverse outcomes, according to a study led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) investigators in collaboration with six other major academic health systems.

Medicine

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Opioid, Antidepressant, Antipsychotic Drugs, Benzodiazepine, Elderly, Senior Health, Central Nervous System (CNS)

Use of Multiple Brain-Affecting Drugs Is Rising Among Seniors, Despite Risks, U-M Research Finds

The number of older Americans who take three or more medicines that affect their brains has more than doubled in just a decade, a new study finds. The sharpest rise occurred in seniors living in rural areas.

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Every Diagnosis of Cancer Should Come with One of These, Says Cancer Expert

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“Every cancer diagnosis should come with a referral to genetic counseling,” says cancer expert Dr. Antonio Giordano, President of the Sbarro Health Research Organization at Temple University.

Medicine

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C. Difficile, CDI, C, Vancomycin, metronidazole, hospital-acquired infection

Routinely Prescribed Antibiotic May Not Be Best for Treating Severe C. diff Infections

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Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile often shortened to C. diff now the most common hospital acquired infection in the United States. But a new study suggests that the most routinely prescribed antibiotic is not the best treatment for severe cases. Scientists at the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and University of Utah School of Medicine report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole.

Medicine

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Cancer, Head And Neck Cancer, Laryngeal Cancer

The Best Treatment for Laryngeal Cancer? This Approach Helps Decide

After a decade of using a novel approach to select patients for laryngeal cancer treatment, researchers are reporting "exceptional" survival rates nearing 80 percent, even for the most advanced patients.

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Breast Cancer, Hormone Therapy, adjuvant endocrine therapy , hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer

Under and Misuse of Hormone Therapy Decreasing, but Still High

A nationwide cancer registry of almost one million patients treated for hormone-sensitive breast cancer shows that one out of six women who should have received post-surgical treatment known as adjuvant endocrine therapy did not get this recommended component of care, which can reduce the odds of recurrence.

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concussion and soccer ball heading, concussion and heading, concussion and soccer, Concussion, head impacts and soccer ball heading, Traumatic Head Injury

Soccer Ball Heading May Commonly Cause Concussion Symptoms

Frequent soccer ball heading is a common and under recognized cause of concussion symptoms, according to a study of amateur players led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers. The findings run counter to earlier soccer studies suggesting concussion injuries mainly result from inadvertent head impacts, such as collisions with other players or a goalpost. The study was published online today in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Alzheimer's, Mayo Clinic Study on Aging, Yonas Geda, Research

Mayo Clinic Researchers Find Mental Activities May Protect Against Mild Cognitive Impairment

PHOENIX – Mayo Clinic researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing mild cognitive impairment. The results are published in the Jan. 30 edition of JAMA Neurology.

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Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, Uniformed Services University, USU, Usuhs, JAMA Surgery, Colon Cancer, Chemotherapy, postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative chemotherapy for young patients, Preventive Medicine, Cancer, Military Health System, MHS

Findings Suggest Overuse of Chemotherapy Among Younger Patients with Colon Cancer

Young and middle-aged patients with colon cancer are nearly two to eight times more likely to receive postoperative chemotherapy than older patients, yet there seems to be no added survival benefits for these patients, according to a study published today in JAMA Surgery by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU).

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eye symptoms, ocular symptoms, Doctor Visit

To Provide Better Eye Care, Ask More Questions in Advance

Quick digital surveys before eye health appointments could help clinicians target care and improve record keeping, a Michigan Medicine study finds.

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Colorectal Cancer, Cancer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Diet

Study Tightens Connection Between Intestinal Microorganisms, Diet, and Colorectal Cancer

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Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute led a study that provides some of the strongest evidence to date that microorganisms living in the large intestine can serve as a link between diet and certain types of colorectal cancer.

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physiological monitors, infant monitors, infant physiological monitors, smartphone applications, Consumer Safety, cardiorespiratory health, Neonatology

Consumer-Use Baby Monitors Have Little Proven Benefit for Healthy Infants

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It sounds simple and harmless—an electronic sensor attached to a baby’s sock that monitors vital signs and alerts parents on their smart phones if, for instance, an infant’s oxygen saturation level drops. But pediatric experts argue that such devices may cause undue alarm to parents, with no evidence of medical benefits, especially to healthy babies.

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GIST, Cancer, Gastroenterology, Surgery, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors , Survival

Small Intestine GIST Associated with Better Prognosis in Younger Patients

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Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are tumors that arise is the wall of the digestive tract, and most often occur in the stomach or small intestine. Though more common in later in life, GISTs can occur in adolescents and young adults (AYA) under 40 years old as well. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report findings from the first population-based analysis of AYA patients with GIST.

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Delirium Could Accelerate Dementia-Related Mental Decline

When hospitalised, people can become acutely confused and disorientated. This condition, known as delirium, affects a quarter of older patients and new research by UCL and the University of Cambridge shows it may have long-lasting consequences, including accelerating the dementia process.

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Hospital Costs, Physician Charges, Health Care Costs, Health Insurance

Patients Face ‘Surprise’ Medical Bills From Out-of-Network Specialists

The average anesthesiologist, emergency physician, pathologist and radiologist charge more than four times what Medicare pays for similar services, often leaving privately-insured consumers stuck with surprise medical bills that are much higher than they anticipated, new research in JAMA suggests.

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Deductibles, High Deductible Health Plans, Health Insurance, Chronic Disease, Diabetes, Asthma, Hypertension, Cancer, joint disease, Mood Disorders

What Do Health Plan Deductibles Really Mean for People with Chronic Illness? New Study Takes a Look

For tens of millions of Americans, the start of a new year means the counter has gone back to zero on their health insurance deductible. If they need health care, they’ll pay for some of it out of their own pockets before their insurance takes over. As insurance plans with deductibles grow in popularity, a new study takes a national look at what those plans mean for people with common chronic health conditions.

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Infection Control, Epidemiology, Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections, bloodstream infection, catheter-related bloodstream infection, Teryl Nuckols

Catheter Safeguards at Hospitals Reduce Infections and Save Money, Study Shows

U.S. hospitals are reducing bloodstream infections related to catheters by implementing rigorous safeguards that also save millions of healthcare dollars each year, according to research led by Cedars-Sinai.

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Afib, Atrial fibrilation, EP, Arrhythmia, Stroke, Warfarin, electrical cardioversion, Radiofrequency Ablation

Medication Adherence a Problem in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

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Anticoagulant therapy is important for stroke prevention in people with atrial fibrillation, but a new study shows many people don’t stick with it.

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Head & Neck Cancer, Cetuximab, Chemotherapy, Radiation, personalized cancer care, Cancer, KRAS mutations, UCLA, UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center

UCLA-Led Study Provides Roadmap to More Personalized Cancer Treatment

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Researchers have found that people with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the KRAS-variant inherited genetic mutation have significantly improved survival when given a short course of the drug cetuximab in combination with standard chemotherapy and radiation.







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