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Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Chemistry, Bacteria, Cell Phones, Cell Phone, Mobile Phone, Mobile Phones, Recycling, recycling electronics, Rare Earth, rare earth element, neodymium, dysprosium, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences, PNAS, Separations, Separation, Materials, materials and manuf

Rare Earth Recycling

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A new energy-efficient separation of rare earth elements could provide a new domestic source of critical materials.

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The Controversial Origin of a Symbol of the American West

New research by Professor Beth Shapiro of the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute and University of Alberta Professor Duane Froese has identified North America’s oldest bison fossils and helped construct a bison genealogy establishing that a common maternal ancestor arrived between 130,000 and 195,000 years ago, during a previous ice age.

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University of Vienna, Language, Physics, Linguistics, Interdisciplinary diffusion, Globalization, Katharina Prochazka, Gero Vogl , language shift, Carinthia, PNAS

Why Do People Switch Their Language?

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Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favour of another, a phenomenon called language shift. Katharina Prochazka and Gero Vogl from the University of Vienna have studied why language shift happens using the example of southern Carinthia, Austria. Making use of methods originally developed in diffusion physics to study the motion of atoms, they built a model for the spread and retreat of languages over time and space. With this model, they were able to show that interaction with other speakers is the main factor influencing whether language shift occurs. The interdisciplinary study is published in the journal PNAS.

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Neurolaw, Neuroscience, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, criminal law, Courts, YALE, Vanderbilt, Macarthur Foundation, Wellcome Trust, Kane Foundation, National Institute On Drug Abuse

Scientists Predict Crime Knowledge States in the Human Brain

Scientists and lawyers speak different languages, but there is common ground. Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists working in a multi-institutional team with legal authorities have discovered that brain imaging can determine whether someone is acting in a state of knowledge about a crime.

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Enlarged Prostate, BPH, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, Fetal Development, Mullerian duct mesenchyme, Stk11 gene, Tumor-suppressing , Aging

Enlarged Prostate Later in Life Could Stem From Fetal Development Early On

New research from Michigan State University indicates that embryonic tissue, key to the development of a baby’s gender, could contribute to an enlarged prostate, or BPH, in men later in life.

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University of Vienna, Caslav Brukner, Faculty of Physics, Blurred Times, Quantum World, measuring time, modern physics, space and time, Quantum Mechanics, Einstein, general relativity, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Clocks, PNAS

"Blurred Times" in a Quantum World

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When measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time. The more precise a given clock is, the more it "blurs" the flow of time measured by neighbouring clocks. As a consequence, the time shown by the clocks is no longer well defined. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

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Vision, Paleontology, Evolution, water-to-land transition, Fossils

Vision, Not Limbs, Led Fish Onto Land 385 Million Years Ago

A Northwestern University and W.M. Keck Science Department of Pitzer, Claremont McKenna and Scripps colleges study suggests it was the power of the eyes and not the limbs that first led our aquatic ancestors to make the leap from water to land. The researchers discovered that eyes nearly tripled in size before -- not after -- the water-to-land transition. Crocodile-like animals saw easy meals on land and then evolved limbs that enabled them to get there, the researchers argue.

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'Black Swan' Events Strike Animal Populations

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A new analysis by the University of Washington and Simon Fraser University is the first to document that "black swan" events also occur in animal populations and usually manifest as massive, unexpected die-offs.

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Whitehead Institute, Harvey Lodish, Autoimmune Disease And Disorder, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Type 1 Diabetes, Disease Prevention

Cargo-Carrying Red Blood Cells Alleviate Autoimmune Diseases in Mice

Using red blood cells modified to carry disease-specific antigens, scientists from Whitehead Institute and Boston Children’s Hospital have prevented and alleviated two autoimmune diseases—multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes—in early stage mouse models.

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Biological and Environmental Research, biological and environmental sciences, Methane, Microbial community, Microbial Communities, Lanthanide, Lanthanides, Lanthanide Complexes, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences, Genomic, Genomic Science, University of Washington, Lakes, Environmental Science

Microbial Community Interactions Drive Methane Consumption in Lakes

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Understanding interactions among organisms in complex microbial communities sheds new light on a globally significant environmental process.







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