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Medicine

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Epilepsy, Seizures, Brain Damage, H

Preventing Seizure-Caused Damage to the Brain

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Tiny vesicles isolated from adult mesenchymal stem cells and administered intranasally can limit the damage to the brain of animal models caused by a seizure disorder called status epilepticus, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Science

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Giant Shipworm

Science Fiction Horror Wriggles Into Reality with Discovery of Giant Sulfur-Powered Shipworm

Our world seems to grow smaller by the day as biodiversity rapidly dwindles, but Mother Earth still has a surprise or two up her sleeve. An international team of researchers were the first to investigate a never before studied species a giant, black, mud dwelling, worm-like animal. The findings will be published online in the Apr. 17 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Epiphany, aha moment, eye-tracking

Aha! Study Examines People as They Are Struck by Sudden Insight

Everybody loves those rare “aha moments” where you suddenly and unexpectedly solve a difficult problem or understand something that had previously perplexed you. But until now, researchers had not had a good way to study how people actually experienced what is called “epiphany learning.”

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Advantage: Water

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When water comes in for a landing on the common catalyst titanium oxide, it splits into hydroxyls just under half the time. Water's oxygen and hydrogen atoms shift back and forth between existing as water or hydroxyls, and water has the slightest advantage, like the score in a highly competitive tennis game.

Science

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Evolution, fish, Marine Biology, Nervous System, sensory system

As Fins Evolve to Help Fish Swim, So Does the Nervous System

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The sensory system in fish fins evolves in parallel to fin shape and mechanics, and is specifically tuned to work with the fish’s swimming behavior, according to new research from the University of Chicago. The researchers found these parallels across a wide range of fish species, suggesting that it may occur in other animals as well.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Science, Separations, Analysis, Proceedings Of The Natinal Academy Of Sciences, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, PNAS, Emsl, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Chemistry, chemical sciences, Chemical Science, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PNNL, Batteries, Battery, Renewable Ener

Coming Together, Falling Apart, and Starting Over, Battery Style

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Scientists built a new device that shows what happens when electrode, electrolyte, and active materials meet in energy storage technologies.

Medicine

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Whitehead Institute, Piyush Gupta, Breast Cancer, genetics and cancer, Biomarker, Early Stage Breast Cancer, Metastasis, Aggressive Breast Cancer

Biomarker Identified for Likely Aggressive, Early Stage Breast Cancer

Whitehead Institute scientists have identified a gene that could help clinicians discern which patients have aggressive forms of early stage breast cancer, which could prevent hundreds of thousands of women from undergoing unnecessary treatment and save millions of dollars.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Chemistry, Bacteria, Cell Phones, Cell Phone, Mobile Phone, Mobile Phones, Recycling, recycling electronics, Rare Earth, rare earth element, neodymium, dysprosium, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences, PNAS, Separations, Separation, Materials, materials and manuf

Rare Earth Recycling

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A new energy-efficient separation of rare earth elements could provide a new domestic source of critical materials.

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The Controversial Origin of a Symbol of the American West

New research by Professor Beth Shapiro of the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute and University of Alberta Professor Duane Froese has identified North America’s oldest bison fossils and helped construct a bison genealogy establishing that a common maternal ancestor arrived between 130,000 and 195,000 years ago, during a previous ice age.

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University of Vienna, Language, Physics, Linguistics, Interdisciplinary diffusion, Globalization, Katharina Prochazka, Gero Vogl , language shift, Carinthia, PNAS

Why Do People Switch Their Language?

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Due to increasing globalization, the linguistic landscape of our world is changing; many people give up use of one language in favour of another, a phenomenon called language shift. Katharina Prochazka and Gero Vogl from the University of Vienna have studied why language shift happens using the example of southern Carinthia, Austria. Making use of methods originally developed in diffusion physics to study the motion of atoms, they built a model for the spread and retreat of languages over time and space. With this model, they were able to show that interaction with other speakers is the main factor influencing whether language shift occurs. The interdisciplinary study is published in the journal PNAS.







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