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Medicine

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short-term memory, Rutishauser, Mamelak, Memory Disorders

Cedars-Sinai Investigators Identify Human Brain Processes Critical to Short-Term Memory

Cedars-Sinai neuroscientists have uncovered processes involved in how the human brain creates and maintains short-term memories. This study is the first clear demonstration of precisely how human brain cells work to create and recall short-term memories. Confirmation of this process and the specific brain regions involved is a critical step in developing meaningful treatments for memory disorders that affect millions of Americans.

Science

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Scarcity of Resources Led to Violence in Prehistoric Central California

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A longtime Cal Poly Pomona anthropology professor who studies violence among prehistoric people in California has been published in a prestigious journal.

Medicine

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Medical, Science, Rehabilitation, Education, Technology, Health, mobility research, Fitness, Therapy, Healthcare

Cal State LA Receives Federal Research Grant to Improve Fitness in Wheelchair Users

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Cal State LA has been awarded a $600,000 grant from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research to research the exercise needs of wheelchair users, specifically those with traumatic spinal cord injuries.

Science

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Cancer, DNA, Glucose, Metabolism, CNA

DNA Patterns Can Unlock How Glucose Metabolism Drives Cancer, Study Finds

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Less aggressive cancers are known to have an intact genome—the complete set of genes in a cell—while the genome of more aggressive cancers tends to have a great deal of abnormalities. Now, a new multi-year study of DNA patterns in tumor cells suggests that these aberrant genetic signatures are not random but reflect selective forces in tumor evolution.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Pediatric HIV, Mother To Child Transmission, HIV-1

Only a Limited HIV Subset Moves From Mother to Child, Study Shows

FINDINGS In the transmission of HIV-1 from mother to child only a subset of a mother’s viruses infects their infants either in utero or via breastfeeding, and the viruses that are transmitted depend on whether transmission occurs during pregnancy or through breastfeeding, according to UCLA-led research. BACKGROUND Mother-to-child transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type1 poses a serious health threat in developing countries, and more effective interventions are needed.

Life

Pop Culture

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Valentine's Day, Dogs, Volunteers, UCLA People Animal Connection, UCLA health, canine volunteers, dog volunteers

Canine Cupids Bring Valentine Cheer to Hospitalized Patients

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A team of pettable cupids made a special delivery to hospitalized patients at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA and UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, on Valentine’s Day, bearing a love-and-kisses message that's sure to stay with the children and adults for a long time. Adorable dogs, dressed up in their Valentine’s Day finest, dutifully delivered handmade Valentine cards throughout the morning today to patients of all ages in their hospital rooms and pediatric playrooms. The canine cupids and their volunteer owners are members of UCLA's People–Animal Connection, an animal-assisted therapy program.

Medicine

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NanoVelcro, UCLA, liquid biopsies, Prostate Cancer, Nanowire, Cancer Moonshot, Hsian-Rong Tseng, PhD, Edwin Posadas, MD

Cedars-Sinai, UCLA Scientists Use New ‘Blood Biopsies’ With Experimental Device to Speed Cancer Diagnosis and Predict Disease Spread

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A team of investigators from Cedars-Sinai and UCLA is using a new blood-analysis technique and tiny experimental device to help physicians predict which cancers are likely to spread by identifying and characterizing tumor cells circulating through the blood.

Medicine

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T. Warner Hudson, Flu expert

It Isn’t Too Late to Get a Flu Shot

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Science

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Biotech, Life Sciences, Biosciences, startup companies, Los Angeles, business accelerators, incubators, STEM careers, Education, College

U.S. Commerce Dept. Awards $500,000 to Cal State LA, Biocom Institute and Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator for Labiostart Boot Camp

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California State University, Los Angeles and its partners the Biocom Institute and the Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) have been awarded an i6 Challenge grant of nearly $500,000 to fund LABioStart, a boot camp to train emerging bioscience entrepreneurs in the region and prepare them to launch bioscience startup companies.

Medicine

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Cardiology and Heart Surgery, Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory , pediatric cardiology, Interventional Cardiology, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Pediatrics, Frank Ing, Heart, Pulmonary Arteries, Tetralogy of Fallot

Using a Printed 3-D Model as a Guide, Cardiologist Creates a Modified Stent to Repair a Toddler’s Pulmonary Artery and Gives a Family Hope

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Using a printed 3-D model as a guide, a Children’s Hospital Los Angeles cardiologist specially modified a stent to repair an 18-month-old’s narrowed pulmonary artery.

Medicine

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Heart, Healthy Heart, Healthy heart tips, Valentine's Day, February Heart Month, Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, sodium consumption, Cholesterol, High Cholesterol, exercise and heart, heart medications, stress and the heart, UCLA Health System, UCLA Cardiology

Give Your Heart a Healthy Valentine’s Day Gift

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While boxes of decadent chocolates treats, celebratory champagne and romantic high-calorie dinners may dance in your mind as a way to celebrate Valentine’s Day, your heart may be pining for something else. With Valentine's Day just around the corner, it is a great time to look at the state of your heart. “Despite recent progress, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States," said Dr. Sheila Sahni, interventional cardiology fellow at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and UCLA Barbra Streisand Women’s Heart Health Program. “Making heart healthy lifestyle choices and taking control of your cardiovascular risk factors can help prevent or slow the progression of heart disease.” Every day decisions are important to cardiovascular health, she adds, and Valentine’s Day is a good time to give yourself the gift of lifestyle changes that will benefit you through the year. Check out these tips.

Medicine

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New Advice Will Help Women with Congenital Heart Defects Navigate Pregnancy

New recommendations for health care providers, published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, offer a road map to helping women with congenital heart disease have successful pregnancies.

Medicine

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Magnet, MRI, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Neuroimaging, Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Medical Device, Epilepsy, Autism, Construction

Photo Gallery: USC Stevens Hall Installs the First Next-Generation 7T MRI Machine in North America

Photo Gallery: Magnet the Weight of 30 Elephants Lowered Through Roof of USC Stevens Hall for Next-Gen 7T MRI Machine

Medicine

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Immunotherapy Resistance , Melanoma, Colon Cancer, PD-1 blockade, Immune System, JAK 1-2, PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors, Cancer

Scientists Discover Why Some Cancers May Not Respond to Immunotherapy

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UCLA scientists have discovered that people with cancers containing genetic mutations JAK1 or JAK2, which are known to prevent tumors from recognizing or receiving signals from T cells to stop growing, will have little or no benefit from the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab. This early-stage research has allowed them to determine for the first time why some people with advanced melanoma or advanced colon cancer will not respond to pembrolizumab, an anti-PD-1 treatment.

Medicine

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Phobia Treatment, Exposure Therapy, Anxiety, fMRI

Less Is More: Exposure to Stimuli for Overcoming Phobia

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A team of investigators, led by Bradley S. Peterson, MD, director of the Institute for the Developing Mind at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, and Paul Siegel, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Purchase College of the State University of New York, have found that exposure to phobic images without conscious awareness is more effective than longer, conscious exposure for reducing fear.

Medicine

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Measles, Vaccines, measles outbreak, UCLA, UCLA health

A Spot Check on Measles [VIDEO]

Dr. Dennis Woo of UCLA Health explains the health concerns around this highly-contagious disease -- and what we should do about it.

Medicine

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flu, Pediatrics, Child Care, UCLA, Vaccine, Flu Vaccination, Flu Vaccine

Peak of Flu Season Starts This Month – Are You Ready? [Video]

In a season of a serious flu, UCLA's Dr. Dennis Woo explains why it's not too late to get the vaccine.

Medicine

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Sleep, Seniors, Insomnia, Sleep Medicine, Sleep Apnea

Older Adults Need as Much Sleep as College Students

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Medicine

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Prostate, Hormone, bicalutamide, GnRH agonists, Samuel Oschin

New Treatment Regimen Extends Life for Some Men With Recurrent Prostate Cancer, Study Finds

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Adding hormonal therapy to radiation treatment can significantly improve the average long-term survival of men with prostate cancer who have had their prostate gland removed, according to a new Cedars-Sinai study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. The regimen also can reduce the frequency of spread of the cancer, the study found.

Medicine

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Levo System, Otoharmonics, Tinnitus, hearing disorders, Ear And Hearing, Ringing In The Ears, Veterans

New Technology Alleviates Tinnitus by Retraining the Brain to Ignore Ringing in the Ears

Tinnitus -- "ringing in the ears" -- affects an estimated 50 million Americans and is the leading service-related disability among U.S. veterans. Until recently, very little could be done for sufferers, but now a new, FDA-approved technology is successfully treating it. The Levo System mimics the buzzing, hissing, whistling or clicking sounds that many tinnitus sufferers describe and "trains" the brain to ignore them, thereby alleviating the condition entirely. To do this, patients wear earbuds at night while sleeping, when the brain is most responsive to sensory input.







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