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Nafld, Liver, Hepatology, Microbiome, Liver Disease, Bacteriology, Biotechnology, Microbiology, Obesity, Mebolic Disease, Diabetes, Pharmaceutical Science

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 2-May-2017 12:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Could Parkinson’s Disease Start in the Gut?

Parkinson’s disease may start in the gut and spread to the brain via the vagus nerve, according to a study published in the April 26, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The vagus nerve extends from the brainstem to the abdomen and controls unconscious body processes like heart rate and food digestion.

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Life

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Honeybees in Danger, Man-Eating Lions of Tsavo, Panamanian Golden Frogs, Giant Sulfur-Powered Shipworms, and More in the Wildlife News Source

The latest research and features on ecology and wildlife.

Medicine

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Microbiome, Gut Bacteria, Salmonella, E. Coli, Mouse, Clostridium

Newborns Get Infection Protection, Not Just Digestion, From Gut Bacteria, New Study in Mice Shows

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Hundreds of thousands of babies worldwide die every year from infections that ravage their digestive systems. New research in mice offers evidence that the difference in survival may come from certain bacteria in their guts, called Clostridia, which appear to provide key protection against infection, in addition to helping digest food.

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Science

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Bacteriology, Biology

Grazing for the Greater Good: Study Finds Amoeba “Grazing,” Killing Bacteria Usually Protected by Film

A University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.

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Is That Real Sand, Orchids and Fungus, Models on Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and More in the Environmental Science News Source

The latest research on the environment in the Environmental Science News Source

Medicine

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age-associated inflammation, intestinal health, Immune Function, gut microbes, TNF)

More Than a ‘Gut Feeling’ on Cause of Age-Associated Inflammation

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Mice in germ-free conditions and then compared to their conventionally raised counterparts. In contrast to conventionally raised mice, the germ-free mice did not show age-related increases in inflammation and a higher proportion of them lived to a ripe old age. Age is associated with an increase in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), in the bloodstream and tissues. It was found that germ-free mice did not have increased TNF with age.

Science

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Bacteria, timesharing, Science (magazine), Division of Biological Sciences, Cell Biology, Biology, Bacteriology, Molecular Biology

Biologists Discover Timesharing Strategy in Bacteria

Biologists have discovered that communities of bacteria have been employing a social timesharing strategy for millions of years. Bacteria facing limited nutrients enter an elegant timesharing strategy--a concept used for vacation homes and social applications--in which communities alternate feeding periods to maximize efficiency.

Medicine

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IBD, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Gastroenterolgy, Crohn Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Liver Disease, epidemiolgy, metabolic risk factor, Cirrhosis, Liver Failure, Liver Fibrosis

Research Focused on Ties Between Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Research led by a Houston Methodist gastroenterologist shows that patients who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) for more than two decades have a higher risk of developing nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

Medicine

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Emily Severance, Schizophrenia, Probiotic, yeast

Probiotics Benefit in Schizophrenia Shaped by Yeast Infections

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In a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast infections.







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