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Medicine

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Mount Sinai Health System, Lung Cancer, Immunotherapy, PD-1, PD-1 blockade, PD-L1 checkpoint inhibitors, Thoracic Surgery

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-May-2017 12:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Nafld, Liver, Hepatology, Microbiome, Liver Disease, Bacteriology, Biotechnology, Microbiology, Obesity, Mebolic Disease, Diabetes, Pharmaceutical Science

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 2-May-2017 12:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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CRISPR-Cas9, genetic, Eye Disease, Ophthalmology, Retinitis Pigmentosa

Using CRISPR to Reverse Retinitis Pigmentosa and Restore Visual Function

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Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health, with colleagues in China, have reprogrammed mutated rod photoreceptors to become functioning cone photoreceptors, reversing cellular degeneration and restoring visual function in two mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa.

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, HIVAIDS, BELIEVE grant, NIH, HIV cure research, HIV Reservoirs, AIDS, HIV

Defective HIV Proviruses Reduce Effective Immune System Response, Interfere with HIV Cure

A new study finds defective HIV proviruses, long thought to be harmless, produce viral proteins and distract the immune system from killing intact proviruses needed to reduce the HIV reservoir and cure HIV. The study was published by researchers at the George Washington University and Johns Hopkins University in Cell Host & Microbe.

Medicine

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HIV, AIDS, Ya Chi Ho, Immune, proviruses

New Evidence: Defective HIV Proviruses Hinder Immune System Response and Cure

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities report new evidence that proteins created by defective forms of HIV long previously believed to be harmless actually interact with our immune systems and are actively monitored by a specific type of immune cell, called cytotoxic T cells.

Medicine

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Insulin, insulin-producing beta cells, Beta Cells, Pancreas

Discovering How Insulin-Producing Cells Show Their Age

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Diabetes researchers have puzzled for decades about why insulin-producing beta cells in one pancreatic islet often look and behave quite differently than their counterparts in the same islet or in nearby islets. Using newly identified cellular markers of aging, Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now have shown that this diversity may be driven at least in part by differently aged beta cell populations within the pancreas.

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Caution Needed for Drugs in Development for Most Common Malignant Pediatric Brain Tumor

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Inhibiting the Ezh2 enzyme may be counterproductive for treatment of certain cancers, including the aggressive brain tumor Group 3 medulloblastoma

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Brain-Aging Gene Discovered

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Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a common genetic variant that greatly affects normal brain aging in older adults. The discovery may point toward new targets for preventing or treating age-associated brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease.

Medicine

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Aging, Nutrition, nutrition and aging, Geriatric, Geriatric Medicine, Stem Cells, intestinal stem cell, IN, rese, Cell Reports, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Wnt Protein, Wnt Signaling, news, press release, Pediatrics, Science

Study Identifies Molecular Clues for Age-Related Intestinal Issues

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Intestinal stem cells rejuvenate daily so bowels will stay healthy and function normally, but a new study in Cell Reports suggests they also age along with people and lose their regenerative capacity. Reporting their data online March 14, researchers suggest that reactivating the signaling of a key molecule lost in aging intestinal stem cells could restore healthy intestinal function in older people.

Medicine

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Aging, cellular metabolism, Endocrinology

Mayo Clinic Discovers High-Intensity Aerobic Training Can Reverse Aging Processes in Adults

Everyone knows that exercise is good for you, but what type of training helps most, especially when you’re older - say over 65? A Mayo Clinic study says it’s high-intensity aerobic exercise, which can reverse some cellular aspects of aging. The findings appear in Cell Metabolism.







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