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Journal of Experimental Medicine

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Medicine

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Listeria Monocytogenes, Cancer, Pregnancy Health, Microbiome, Gut Bacteria and Health, Probiotics

Gut Bacteria Could Protect Cancer Patients and Pregnant Women From Listeria, Study Suggests

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Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study, which will be published June 6 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

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Robert Siliciano, Johns Hopkins, HIV, Immune Cells, Therapy, latent HIV, Reservoirs, CD4+ T

Reservoirs of Latent HIV Can Grow Despite Effective Therapy, Study Shows

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report new evidence that immune cells infected with a latent form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are able to proliferate, replenishing the reservoir of virus that is resistant to antiretroviral drug therapy. Although HIV can be controlled with therapy in most cases, the proliferation of such reservoir cells pose a persistent barrier to developing a cure for HIV, researchers say.

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Heart Failure, G protein-coupled receptor , Drug Target, Cardiology, Chronic Heart Failure

Scientists Identify Protein Linked to Chronic Heart Failure

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Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, “Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction,” which will be published May 26 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide.

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Inflamamatory Bowel Disease (Ibd), Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Microrna, inflammasome

Researchers Uncover Key Role for MicroRNA in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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An international team of researchers has discovered that a microRNA produced by certain white blood cells can prevent excessive inflammation in the intestine. The study, “Myeloid-derived miR-223 regulates intestinal inflammation via repression of the NLRP3 inflammasome,” which will be published May 9 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that synthetic versions of this microRNA can reduce intestinal inflammation in mice and suggests a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

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Autoimmune Disease, Autoimmunity, Lupus, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Dermatomyositis, Interferons, Medical Technology, Diagnostics

Researchers Describe Ultrasensitive Detection of Protein Linked to Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

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Researchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. The technique, which is described in the study “Detection of interferon- protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease” published April 18 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerous autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and dermatomyositis.

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Anthrax, Immunology, bacterial spores, Bacteria Host Interaction

Anthrax Spores Use RNA Coat to Mislead Immune System

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Researchers from Harvard Medical School have discovered that the body’s immune system initially detects the presence of anthrax spores by recognizing RNA molecules that coat the spores’ surface. But this prompts an unfavorable immune response that hinders the body’s fight against anthrax once the spores have germinated into live bacteria, according to the study “TLR sensing of bacterial spore-associated RNA triggers host immune responses with detrimental effects,” which will be published April 11 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Influenza A, flu, Pandemic, Immunology, Transgenic Mouse

Researchers Develop Mouse That Could Provide Advance Warning of Next Flu Pandemic

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Researchers in Germany have developed a transgenic mouse that could help scientists identify new influenza virus strains with the potential to cause a global pandemic. The mouse is described in a study, “In vivo evasion of MxA by avian influenza viruses requires human signature in the viral nucleoprotein,” that will be published April 10 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Diabetic Retinopathy, Retinopathy Of Prematurity, Premature Babies, Diabetes, Angiogenesis, Lucentis, Eylea, Ranibizumab, aflibercept, Drug Discovery

Study Suggests New Way to Prevent Vision Loss in Diabetics and Premature Babies

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Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, “Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,” which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants.

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Daniela Cihakova, mice, Heart Failure, Eosinophils, Brain, Inflammation, Myocarditis

Rare Type of Immune Cell Responsible for Progression of Heart Inflammation to Heart Failure in Mice

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A new study in mice reveals that eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell, appear to be at least partly responsible for the progression of heart muscle inflammation to heart failure in mice.

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Breast Cancer, Basal Like, triple negative breast cancer, epalrestat, Diabetes

Diabetes Drug May Be Effective Against Deadly Form of Breast Cancer, Study Suggests

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Researchers in China have discovered that a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 drives an aggressive type of breast cancer. The study, “AKR1B1 promotes basal-like breast cancer progression by a positive feedback loop that activates the EMT program,” which has been published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that an inhibitor of this enzyme currently used to treat diabetes patients could be an effective therapy for this frequently deadly form of cancer.







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