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Journal of Experimental Medicine

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Medicine

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Autoimmune Disease, Autoimmunity, Lupus, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Dermatomyositis, Interferons, Medical Technology, Diagnostics

Researchers Describe Ultrasensitive Detection of Protein Linked to Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

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Researchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. The technique, which is described in the study “Detection of interferon- protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease” published April 18 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerous autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and dermatomyositis.

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Anthrax, Immunology, bacterial spores, Bacteria Host Interaction

Anthrax Spores Use RNA Coat to Mislead Immune System

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Researchers from Harvard Medical School have discovered that the body’s immune system initially detects the presence of anthrax spores by recognizing RNA molecules that coat the spores’ surface. But this prompts an unfavorable immune response that hinders the body’s fight against anthrax once the spores have germinated into live bacteria, according to the study “TLR sensing of bacterial spore-associated RNA triggers host immune responses with detrimental effects,” which will be published April 11 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Influenza A, flu, Pandemic, Immunology, Transgenic Mouse

Researchers Develop Mouse That Could Provide Advance Warning of Next Flu Pandemic

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Researchers in Germany have developed a transgenic mouse that could help scientists identify new influenza virus strains with the potential to cause a global pandemic. The mouse is described in a study, “In vivo evasion of MxA by avian influenza viruses requires human signature in the viral nucleoprotein,” that will be published April 10 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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Diabetic Retinopathy, Retinopathy Of Prematurity, Premature Babies, Diabetes, Angiogenesis, Lucentis, Eylea, Ranibizumab, aflibercept, Drug Discovery

Study Suggests New Way to Prevent Vision Loss in Diabetics and Premature Babies

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Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, “Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,” which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants.

Medicine

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Daniela Cihakova, mice, Heart Failure, Eosinophils, Brain, Inflammation, Myocarditis

Rare Type of Immune Cell Responsible for Progression of Heart Inflammation to Heart Failure in Mice

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A new study in mice reveals that eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell, appear to be at least partly responsible for the progression of heart muscle inflammation to heart failure in mice.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Basal Like, triple negative breast cancer, epalrestat, Diabetes

Diabetes Drug May Be Effective Against Deadly Form of Breast Cancer, Study Suggests

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Researchers in China have discovered that a metabolic enzyme called AKR1B1 drives an aggressive type of breast cancer. The study, “AKR1B1 promotes basal-like breast cancer progression by a positive feedback loop that activates the EMT program,” which has been published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that an inhibitor of this enzyme currently used to treat diabetes patients could be an effective therapy for this frequently deadly form of cancer.

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Cancer, Leukemia, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, FLT3, RUNX1

Tumor Suppressor Promotes Some Acute Myeloid Leukemias, Study Reveals

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Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, “RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,” which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

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myelin diseases, Tuberous sclerosis complex, Autism, Epilepsy, Neurobiology

Researchers Identify New Cause of Brain Defects in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

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Boston Children’s Hospital researchers have uncovered a new molecular pathway that inhibits the myelination of neurons in the brains of patients with the rare genetic disorder tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). The study, “Neuronal CTGF/CCN2 negatively regulates myelination in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex,” which will be published online February 9 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests new ways to treat some of the neurological symptoms associated with TSC, including autism and epilepsy.

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Jonathan Kipnis, Kipnis, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Brain, Neuroimmunology, Immunology, multiple sclerosis, Meningitis, Traumatic Brain Injury, TBI, Migraines, Disease, Neurological Diseases, Spinal Cord Injury, Microbiota, GUT, Microbiome, Missing Link, type 2 innate lymphocytes, Immune System, brain immune system, brain

UVA Discovers Powerful Defenders of the Brain -- with Big Implications for Disease and Injury

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A rare and potent type of immune cell has been discovered around the brain, suggesting the cells may play a critical role in battling Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis and other diseases. By harnessing the cells' power, doctors may be able to develop new treatments for disease, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries – even migraines.

Medicine

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Autoimmunity, IPEX syndrome, Microbiome, Childhood Diseases, Regulatory T Cells, Foxp3

Gut Bacteria May Hold Key to Treating Autoimmune Disease

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Defects in the body’s regulatory T cells cause inflammation and autoimmune disease by altering the type of bacteria living in the gut, researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered. The study, which will be published online December 19 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that replacing the missing gut bacteria, or restoring a key metabolite called inosine, could help treat children with a rare and often fatal autoimmune disease called IPEX syndrome.







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