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Education, Robotics, Computer Programming, Parenting

Can Early Experiences with Computers, Robots Increase STEM Interest Among Young Girls?

Girls start believing they aren't good at math, science and even computers at a young age — but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence. A study from the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) finds that, when exposed to a computer-programming activity, 6-year-old girls expressed greater interest in technology and more positive attitudes about their own skills and abilities than girls who didn't try the activity.

Life

Arts and Humanities, Education

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Bicycle, art and design, Engineering, stem, Bike building, Academics, art and engineering, University Of Iowa, TREK, unique academic program, Job Placement, Undergraduate Students

Two Disciplines. Two Wheels. One Unique Program.

The University of Iowa is home to one of the country's only academic bicycle frame-building courses, which industry experts say is setting a worldwide standard for the craft.

Life

Education

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stem, kids, Science, Higher Education, inner-city, technology and engineering

“STEM in Action: A Kids Conference” Provides Inner-City Youth Activities, Knowledge and Fun

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California State University, Dominguez Hills’ (CSUDH) 3rd Annual “STEM in Action: A Kids Conference” on April 28 will provide close to 1,000 inner-city students the opportunity to participate in interactive science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) activities that will help inspire them to become lifelong learners.

Medicine

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organ allocation, Organ And Tissue Donation, organ donation rate, Organ Donation, Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, University of Montreal, Montreal, Medical Research, Mathematics, Biology, Transplant Guidelines, Neprhology, kidney donor

Organ Donation: A New Frontier for AI?

Getting the right organ to the right recipient is always a challenge. University of Montreal scientists think artificial intelligence can help.

Science

Business

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Utrafast Imaging, Smallest Transistor, Electronic Cyclones, Sensor-Filled Glove, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Science

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Rocket, Space, stem, Moonshot Initiative, Base 11, Gregory Washington, The Henry Samueli School of Engineering

With $1 Million Gift, UCI Aims to Become First University to Launch Rocket Into Space

University of California, Irvine students will “shoot for the moon” thanks to a $1 million gift from Base 11, a nonprofit STEM workforce development and entrepreneur accelerator. The “Moonshot Initiative” will establish a rocketry program at The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, with the intent of making UCI the first academic institution to launch a liquid-fuel rocket into space.

Science

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Penn State Engineering Science and Mechanics Professors Tittmann and Ashok to Retire

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Bernhard Tittmann and S. Ashok, two long-time professors in the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, will retire from Penn State following the spring 2017 semester.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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march for science

Scientists, Engineers Sound Off on March for Science

Life

Education

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Stem Education, STEM Education Policy, Early Childhood Education, STEM careers, Kindergarten, Nevada

Why STEM Education Must Begin in Early Childhood Education

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UNLV education policy experts explain why Nevada must prioritize STEM educational experiences for all children, and why waiting until kindergarten is too late.

Science

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Gender, bias, Equality

Study: Accomplished Female Scientists Often Overlooked

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Invited speakers at neuroimmunology conferences in 2016 were disproportionately male, and not because men produced higher quality work, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Instead, qualified female scientists were overlooked by conference organizers.







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