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Medicine

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Stem Cell, Stem Cell Development, Multiple Sclerosis (MS), Myelin

New Method Isolates Best Brain Stem Cells to Treat MS

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The prospect of doing human clinical trials with stem cells to treat diseases like multiple sclerosis may be growing closer, say scientists at UB and U of R who have developed a more precise way to isolate stem cells that will make myelin.

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Researchers Discover Novel Mechanism for Preventing Infection via Body’s Mucosal Borders

Researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology have identified a previously unknown mechanism that generates protective immune memory cells to fight recurring infections at the body’s mucosal linings – which include the mouth, the intestines, the lungs and other areas. These are the main entry points for many viruses and other infectious organisms.

Medicine

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Heart Disease, University Of Maryland, heart cells communicate , reactive oxygen species, calcium sparks, new mechanism, therapy targets promise, Lederer, biological glue

Newly Discovery Heart ‘Mechanism’ to Provide New Targets for Heart Therapies

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University of Maryland researchers patented and licensed a “Bio-glue” that allows simulation of mechanical and chemical heartbeats from a single cell.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Cell Biology

Nano-Thermometers Show First Temperature Response Differences within Living Cells

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Using a modern version of open-wide-and-keep-this-under-your-tongue, scientists today reported taking the temperature of individual cells in the human body, and finding for the first time that temperatures inside do not adhere to the familiar 98.6 degree Fahrenheit norm. They presented the research at the 242nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held here this week.

Medicine

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Ebola, Ebola Virus, Host Factors, Cell Biology, Antiviral Therapeutics, Niemann Pick Type C Disease (Np C)

Scientists Identify Point of Entry for Deadly Ebola Virus

Using an unusual human cell line of this type, Whitehead Institute researchers and their collaborators performed a genetic screen and identified a protein used by Ebola virus to gain entry into cells and begin replicating. The discovery may offer a new approach for the development of antiviral therapeutics.

Medicine

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Computational Biology, Gene Expression Omnibus, Pharmacology, Genomics, GWAS, Cancer, Gastroenterology, Bioinformatics, drug repositioning

Computational Method Predicts New Uses for Existing Medicines

For the first time ever, scientists are using computers and genomic information to predict new uses for existing medicines. A National Institutes of Health-funded computational study analyzed genomic and drug data to predict new uses for medicines that are already on the market.

Medicine

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Gene Therapy, Gene Therapies, Cystic Fibrosis, Huntington Disease, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, ALS, Lou Gehrig's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease

Molecular Delivery Truck Serves Gene Therapy Cocktail

Scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine have devised a gene therapy cocktail that has the potential to treat some inherited diseases associated with “misfolded” proteins.

Science

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Nationwide Children's Hospital, ALS, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Als), Lou Gehrig's Disease, Center for Gene Therapy, Dr. Brian Kaspar , National Institute Of Health

Human-Cell-Derived Model of ALS Provides a New Way to Study the Majority of Cases

For decades, scientists have studied a laboratory mouse model that develops signs of the paralyzing disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as they age. In a new study appearing in Nature Biotechnology, investigators at Nationwide Children’s Hospital have developed a new model of ALS, one that mimics sporadic ALS, which represents about 90 percent of all cases.

Medicine

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regenerative madicine, Biotechnology, Urinary Incontinence (UI), Fecal Incontinence

Human Cells Used to Engineer Functional Anal Sphincters

Researchers have built the first functional anal sphincters in the laboratory, suggesting a potential future treatment for both fecal and urinary incontinence.

Science

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Plant Diseases, Plant Pathogen, Agriculture, Jeff Dangl, Arabadopsis, Interactome, virulence proteins, effectors, Seeds, Crops, Biotechnology, Immunology, Microbiology, plant immune system

Scientists Map Attack Tactics of Plant Pathogens

Each year, plant diseases wipe out millions of tons of crops and waste valuable water resources. But a new discovery suggests that all pathogens attack plants via a surprisingly limited number of cellular targets. The finding could help researchers develop disease resistant crops and environmentally sustainable treatments for plant diseases.







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