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Whitman School , whitman school of management, syracuse university, Business, Business School, Organizational Culture, Human Resources, Creativity, Research, Psychology, Management, kellogg school of management, Northwestern University, lynne vincent

New Research Shows Relationships Among Creative Identity, Entitlement and Dishonesty Hinge on Perception of Creativity as Rare

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Think that you are special because you are creative? Well, you are not alone, and there may be some serious consequences especially if you believe that creativity is rare. A new study by Lynne Vincent, an assistant professor of management at Syracuse University’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management, and Maryam Kouchaki, an assistant professor of management and organizations at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, demonstrates that believing that you are a creative person can create feelings of entitlement when you think that creativity is rare and valuable. That feeling of entitlement can be costly for you and your organization as it can cause you to be dishonest.

Business

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Whitman School , whitman school of management, Organizational Culture, Creativity, Business, Business Education, syracuse university, lynne vincent, maryam kouchaki, Northwestern University, kellogg school of management, Apple, Google, ideo, Academy Of Management Journal

New Research Shows Relationships Among Creative Identity, Entitlement and Dishonesty Hinge on Perception of Creativity as Rare

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Think that you are special because you are creative? Well, you are not alone, and there may be some serious consequences especially if you believe that creativity is rare. A new study by Lynne Vincent, an assistant professor of management at Syracuse University’s Martin J. Whitman School of Management, and Maryam Kouchaki, an assistant professor of management and organizations at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, demonstrates that believing that you are a creative person can create feelings of entitlement when you think that creativity is rare and valuable. That feeling of entitlement can be costly for you and your organization as it can cause you to be dishonest.

Science

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GOLD, Chemistry, Chemistry & Materials, Catalyst

Southampton Chemists Create Switchable Gold Catalyst

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A gold catalyst whose behaviour can be controlled by the addition of acid or metal ion cofactors has been designed by chemists from the University of Southampton.

Life

Education

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Higher Education, Student outcomes, Digital Textbooks

Digital Textbook Analytics Can Predict Student Outcomes

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College professors and instructors can learn a lot from the chapters of a digital textbook that they assign students to read. According to a new Iowa State University study, digital books provide real-time analytics to help faculty assess how students are doing in the class.

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Women's Rights, Abortion, God, Religion, Obedience , Freedom, Biblical, Bible, Bible in American life, Sexuality, Reproductive Health, Empowerment, Marriage Equality, Women, Gender Inequality, Submission, Christian, Gender Roles, Disobedience, Sex, Feminist Theory, Feminism

St. Mary’s College Religious Studies Professor Examines Christian Perspectives on Women’s Sexuality, Reproductive Rights in America

What are women’s rights with respect to reproduction and sexuality? This question is controversial, but Katharina von Kellenbach, professor of religious studies at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, takes a clear stand: “Women have a right, and a responsibility, to be able to say ‘no’… to childbearing and sex.” In her new essay, “The Paradox of Freedom: Mary, the Manhattan Declaration and Women’s Submission to Childbearing,” von Kellenbach questions biblical interpretations of freedom that are used to restrict women’s moral agency in the United States.

Science

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DNA, Biochemistry, nano, Nanomachines, Diagnostics, Medicine, Health

Molecular Diagnostics at Home: Chemists Design Rapid, Simple, Inexpensive Tests Using DNA

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Chemists at the University of Montreal used DNA molecules to developed rapid, inexpensive medical diagnostic tests that take only a few minutes to perform.

Medicine

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Mental Health, Depression, Neuroscience, Anxiety, Gender, Women, Cognition

Do Women Experience Negative Emotions Differently Than Men?

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Women react differently to negative images compared to men, which may be explained by subtle differences in brain function. This neurobiological explanation for women’s apparent greater sensitivity has been demonstrated by researchers.

Medicine

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Alchohol, Underage Drinking, Interventions, Emergency Department (ED), Emergency Medicine

Emergency Department Visit Provides Opportunity to Reduce Underage Drinking

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The results of a five-year trial from faculty at the University of Michigan Injury Center found giving youth in the emergency department a short intervention during their visit decreased their alcohol consumption and problems related to drinking over the following year.

Medicine

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Physiology, Aging, Neurology

Researchers Identify Possible Physiological Cause of Brain Deficits with Aging

Like scratchy-sounding old radio dials that interfere with reception, circuits in the brain that grow noisier over time may be responsible for ways in which we slow mentally as we grow old, according to the results of new studies from UC San Francisco on young and older adults.

Medicine

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Influenza, flu, Virulence, Innate Immune Response

Possible Contributor to the Virulence of the 1918 Flu Pandemic Discovered

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UAB researchers have discovered a novel mechanism for one 1918 flu virus protein that may help explain the virulence of that unusually deadly pandemic. That outbreak killed 50 million to 100 million people.







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