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Science

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Regenerative Medicine, Kalpana Katti, Tissue Engineering, bone tissue engineering, generating bone, nanoclays, Arthritis, Bone Mineral Density, Osteoporosis, Bone Mineralization, Bone Regeneration, Bone Research

Study Coaxes Clays to Make Human Bone

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Whether damaged by injury, disease or age, your body can’t create new bone, but maybe science can. Researchers at North Dakota State University, Fargo, are making strides in tissue engineering, designing scaffolds that may lead to ways to regenerate bone. Published in the Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, the research of Dr. Kalpana Katti, Dr. Dinesh Katti and graduate student Avinash Ambre includes a novel method that uses nanosized clays to make scaffolds to mineralize bone minerals such as hydroxyapatite.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Multi-National Study Identifies Links Between Genetic Variants and Educational Attainment

A multi-national team of researchers has identified genetic markers that predict educational attainment by pooling data from more than 125,000 individuals in the United States, Australia, and 13 western European countries.

Medicine

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Women Less at Risk than Men for Healthcare-Associated Infections

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A new study from Columbia University School of Nursing supports a growing body of evidence that women are less likely to contract bloodstream or surgical site infections than their male counterparts.

Medicine

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Healthy Lifestyle Choices Mean Fewer Memory Complaints, Poll by UCLA and Gallup Finds

Research has shown that healthy behaviors are associated with a lower risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, but less is known about the potential link between positive lifestyle choices and milder memory complaints, especially those that occur earlier in life and could be the first indicators of later problems.

Science

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O'Keeffe Foundation, Neuroscience

O'Keeffe Foundation Donates $250,000 to Scripps Florida

The Esther B. O'Keeffe Charitable Foundation has made a $250,000 donation to The Scripps Research Institute to fund neuroscience training and public outreach on the Florida campus.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Adolescent Obesity, Adolescent Health, Fast Food, Low-income Students, Minority Students, Black Students, Hispanic Students, Asian students, caucasian student, exercise and kids, Urban Schools, BMI, California schools

Fast-Food Restaurants Near Schools Affect Black and Hispanic Students More Than Asian and White Students

WACO, Texas (May 30, 2013) - When their schools are near fast-food restaurants, black and Hispanic adolescents are more likely to be overweight and receive less benefit from exercise than Asian or white students, according to a study published in the current issue of Journal of Public Policy & Marketing. The study underscores the importance of understanding how adolescents respond to fast-food availability near school.

Medicine

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HIV-Positive patients, New York City, AIDS, AIDS Journal

New York City Successfully Locates HIV-Positive Patients 'Lost to Follow-Up'

Public health officials in New York City have launched a successful program to locate HIV-positive patients who have been "lost to follow-up" and reconnect them with treatment services, reports a study published in AIDS, official journal of the International AIDS Society. AIDS is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Medicine

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Contaminated Steroid Outbreak, fungal meningitis, Infections, Virginia Department of Health, VDH

Virginia's 'Hybrid' Surveillance Strategy Aided Response to Contaminated Steroid Outbreak

An innovative "hybrid" surveillance strategy—highlighted by close cooperation between public health officials and clinical partners—helped Virginia mount an efficient and effective response to the ongoing outbreak of fungal meningitis and other infections, according to a report in the July/August issue of Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Medicine

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Law Enforcement, Homicide, Occupational Safety, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Of Public Health

Ninety-Three Percent of Homicides of U.S. Law Enforcement Officers Result From Firearms

While occupational homicides continue to decline in the U.S., law enforcement remains one of the deadliest jobs in America. A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health The report found documents that 93 percent of homicides of law enforcement officers between 1996 and 2010 were committed with firearms. Among those homicides, 10 percent were committed using the officer’s own service weapon. The findings could help develop new procedures to reduce risk to officers.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Mate Selection, Reproductive Biology, Anthropology, Fertility, Attractiveness

Big Feet Preference in Rural Indonesia Defies One-Size-Fits-All Theory of Attractiveness

People in most cultures view women with small feet as attractive and a sign of a potential mate's youth and fertility. But a new research study shows that the Karo Batak living in rural villages in Indonesia deem women with big feet as more appealing, suggesting that culture – not just genetics – plays a role in deciding what makes a mate attractive.

Medicine

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Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Cardiac Surgery May Increase Risk of Infection

The risk of postoperative infection appears to increase when patients receive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion during or after cardiac surgery, and greater attention to practices that limit red blood cell use could potentially reduce the occurrence of major postoperative infections

Medicine

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Low Mortality Hospitals Better Equipped to Handle Heart Surgery Complications

Hospitals with low rates of patient mortality appear better able to rescue patients from complications following cardiac surgery.

Medicine

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Sleep, Heart Attack, Acute Coronary Syndrome, PTSD, post-traumatic stress disorder , Cardiac, Female, Women, Body Mass Index, BMI, Hispanic, Depression, Comorbid

Poor Sleep Linked to PTSD After Heart Attack

The more heart attack-induced PTSD symptoms a patient has, the worse their sleep likely was in the month following their heart attack. New findings from a research team at Columbia University Medical Center’s Center for Behavioral Cardiovascular Health, published in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Computerization, Computer Technology, Income Inequality, Labor Unions, Economics, Employment, Unemployment, Corporate Profits

Labor Union Decline, Not Computerization, Main Cause of Rising Corporate Profits at the Expense of Workers’ Compensation

A new study suggests that the decline of labor unions, partly as an outcome of computerization, is the main reason why U.S. corporate profits have surged as a share of national income while workers’ wages and other compensation have declined.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Education, Health Disparities, Mortality, Health, Employment, Smoking, Socioeconomics, Economic Circumstances, Women, Women's Health, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

Study Helps Explain Growing Education Gap in Mortality Among U.S White Women

Less-educated white women were increasingly more likely to die than their better-educated peers from the mid-1990s through the mid-2000s, according to a new study, which found that growing disparities in economic circumstances and health behaviors—particularly employment status and smoking habits—across education levels accounted for an important part of the widening mortality gap.

Medicine

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perceptual learning, Amblyopia, Lazy Eye, central vision loss , Visual Plasticity, Optometry and Vision Science, Vision, American Academy of Optometry, Optometry, Vision Loss, preferred retinal location

'Preferred Retinal Location' May Aid Rehabilitation in Patients with Central Vision Loss

Perceptual learning techniques may provide a useful new approach to rehabilitation in patients with central vision loss—taking advantage of visual plasticity that persists even in old age, according to a special article in the June issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

Medicine

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Professor Collaborates on Most Comprehensive Anaylses of NSAIDs and Coxibs

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Charles H. Hennekens, M.D., Dr.P.H. and colleagues from around the world, under the direction of the Clinical Trial Service and Epidemiology Studies Unit at the University of Oxford, conducted a world-wide meta-analyses using individual participant data from 280 trials of NSAIDs vs. placebo and 474 trials of NSAID vs. another NSAID, which involved a total of 353,809 participants and a total of 233,798 person-years. These results address risks and benefits of drugs used for relief of inflammatory arthritis including cardiovascular disease and other relevant outcomes such as gastrointestinal effects.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Autism Spectrum Disorders, Early Learning, Brain, Neuroscience, Children, Language Learning, Social & Emotional Learning, Brain Activity Patterns

Early Brain Responses to Words Predict Developmental Outcomes in Children with Autism

The pattern of brain responses to words in 2-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder predicted the youngsters' linguistic, cognitive and adaptive skills at ages 4 and 6, according to a new study. The findings are among the first to demonstrate that a brain marker can predict future abilities in children with autism.

Medicine

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Diabetes, Obesity, Artificial Sweeteners, Glucose, Insulin, Metabolism

Artificial Sweeteners May Do More Than Sweeten

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a popular artificial sweetener can modify how the body handles sugar. They analyzed the sweetener sucralose in 17 severely obese people and found it can influence how the body reacts to glucose.

Medicine

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Bariatric Surgery, Blood Thinners, Blood Clots, Obese Patients, VTE, Pulmonary Embolism, Daniel Brotman, Johns Hopkins University

Temporary Blood Clot Filters May Do More Harm Than Good for Bariatric Surgery Patients

The temporary placement of umbrella-like, metal mesh filters in abdominal veins to stop potentially lethal blood clots from traveling to the lungs during and after weight loss surgery may actually increase the risk of death in morbidly obese patients, according to new Johns Hopkins research.







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