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Leaf Mysteries Revealed Through the Computer's Eye

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A computer program that learns and can categorize leaves into large evolutionary categories such as plant families will lead to greatly improved fossil identification and a better understanding of flowering plant evolution, according to an international team of researchers.

Medicine

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Science Education, Biology, Microbiology, Undergraduate, stem

'Me-Search': U-M Students Analyze Their Own Biological Samples to Study How Microbes Affect Human Health

A "me-search" lab for University of Michigan biology undergraduates gives students a close look at what might be the most compelling study subject of all: themselves.

Science

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Caenorhabditis Elegans, Sleep, Genetics, Neuroscience, C. Elegans, Cell Biology

Molecule Induces Lifesaving Sleep in Worms

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Sometimes, a nematode worm just needs to take a nap. In fact, its life may depend on it. New research has identified a protein that promotes a sleep-like state in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Without the snooze-inducing molecule, worms are more likely to die when confronted with stressful conditions, report researchers in the March 7, 2016 issue of the journal GENETICS.

Medicine

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Cancer, Neuroblastoma, VCU, Virginia Commonwealth University, Massey Cancer Center, VCU Massey Cancer Center

VCU Scientists Work to Bring About a New Treatment for Rare Childhood Cancer

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Neuroblastoma accounts for the most pediatric deaths for any tumor outside of the brain. The most lethal form of this tumor is often associated with amplification of the gene MYCN, and now VCU scientists may have developed a combination therapy that uses this gene to kill the cancer, instead of making it grow.

Science

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'Four-Flavored' Tetraquark, Planets Born Like Cracking Paint, New 2D Materials, The World's Newest Atom-Smasher in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

'Four-Flavored' Tetraquark, Planets Born Like Cracking Paint, New 2D Materials, The World's Newest Atom-Smasher in the Physics News Source sponsored by AIP.

Medicine

Science

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zika, zika virus, Stem Cell

Florida State University Researchers Make Zika Virus Breakthrough

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Florida State University researchers have made a major breakthrough in the quest to learn whether the Zika virus is linked to birth defects with the discovery that the virus is directly targeting brain development cells and stunting their growth. This is the first major finding by scientists that shows that these critical cells are a target of the virus and also negatively affected by it.

Medicine

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zika virus, microcephaly , Neural Progenitor Cells

Likely Biological Link Found Between Zika Virus, Microcephaly

Working with lab-grown human stem cells, a team of researchers suspect they have discovered how the Zika virus probably causes microcephaly in fetuses. The virus selectively infects cells that form the brain’s cortex, or outer layer, making them more likely to die and less likely to divide normally and make new brain cells.

Medicine

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Cells Collected From Preterm Infants’ Urine May Advance Regenerative Kidney Repair

• Urine collected from preterm infants one day after birth often contains progenitor cells that can develop into mature kidney cells. • The cells also have natural defenses that protect against cell death.

Medicine

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Cell Death Mechanism, Apoptosis, Cell Suicide, Programmed Cell Death, mitochondrial cell death, ERAD, BOK

Scientists Reveal Alternative Route for Cell Death

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists show that BCL-2 ovarian killer or BOK triggers mitochondrial cell death; process regulated by stability of the BOK protein

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For Females, a Little Semen May Go a Long Way

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For most guys in the animal kingdom, sex is a once-and-done event. Females from species like rabbits and cows get sperm from their mates and not much else. But in a Forum article published March 3 in Trends in Ecology & Evolution, researchers suggest that these limited encounters can supply resources to females in seminal fluid, and females might have evolved to seek out such seminal resources, even when the amount of fluid is small.







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