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Cornell Engineers Solve a Biological Mystery and Boost Artificial Intelligence

By simulating 25,000 generations of evolution within computers, Cornell University engineering and robotics researchers have discovered why biological networks tend to be organized as modules – a finding that will lead to a deeper understanding of the evolution of complexity.

Science

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spider silk, Chemistry And Chemical Biology, Bioengineering, Arizona State University

Scientists Unravel the Mysteries of Spider Silk

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Scientists at ASU are celebrating their recent success on the path to understanding what makes the fiber that spiders spin – weight for weight – at least five times as strong as piano wire.

Science

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Engineering, Technology, Computer Science, Physics

Liquid Metal Makes Silicon Crystals at Record Low Temperatures

A new way of making crystalline silicon, developed by U-M researchers, could make this crucial ingredient of computers and solar cells much cheaper and greener.

Science

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Mechanical Engineering, cars, Automobiles, Electric Cars, Eco Friendly

Motion Control Keeps Electric Car’s Four Wheels—and Four Motors—on the Road

It weighs half as much as a sports car, and turns on a dime—so its no surprise that the electric car being developed at Ohio State University needs an exceptional traction and motion control system to keep it on the road.

Science

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chemical shielding, Engineering, repellant surfaces, water resistance

A Material That Most Liquids Won't Wet

A nanoscale coating that's at least 95 percent air repels the broadest range of liquids of any material in its class, causing them to bounce off the treated surface, according to the University of Michigan engineering researchers who developed it.

Science

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UAV, unmanned aerial vehicle, Sensor, Radar, airborne testing

Small UAV Supports Development of Lightweight Sensors

Engineers at the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) are developing an airborne testing capability for sensors, communications devices and other payloads. Their aerial test bed is known as the GTRI Airborne Unmanned Sensor System (GAUSS).

Medicine

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Tissue Engineering, Hydrogel, Cartilage

Tissue Engineers Report Knee Cartilage Repair Success with New Biomaterial

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In a small study, researchers reported increased healthy tissue growth after surgical repair of damaged cartilage if they put a “hydrogel” scaffolding into the wound to support and nourish the healing process. The squishy hydrogel material was implanted in 15 patients during standard microfracture surgery, in which tiny holes are punched in a bone near the injured cartilage. The holes stimulate patients’ own specialized stem cells to emerge from bone marrow and grow new cartilage atop the bone.

Science

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Computational Biology, Big Data, Plant Sciences

Iowa State Computer, Electrical Engineers Working to Help Biologists Cope with Big Data

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Iowa State computer and electrical engineers are developing computing tools to help biologists analyze all the data produced by today's research instruments.

Science

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ultrastable glasses, Molecular Engineering, vapor deposition, evolution of glasses, Computer Simulations

Study Reveals Ordinary Glass’s Extraordinary Properties

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Researchers at the universities of Chicago and Wisconsin-Madison raise the possibility of designing ultrastable glasses at the molecular level via a vapor-deposition process. Such glasses could find potential applications in the production of stronger metals and in faster-acting pharmaceuticals.

Science

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Cybersecurity, cyber attack, Hacking, Computer Science, Voice Over Internet Protocol, VOIP, Cisco

Computer Scientists Find Vulnerabilities in Cisco VoIP Phones

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Columbia Engineering researchers have found vulnerabilities in Cisco VoIP telephones, recently demonstrating how they can insert malicious code into a Cisco VoIP phone (any of the 14 Cisco Unified IP Phone models) and start eavesdropping on private conversations—not just on the phone but also in the phone’s surroundings—from anywhere in the world.







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