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Science

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Bioengineering, Angiogenesis, Computer Modeling, Blood Vessels, capillaries, Blood Vessel Growth, In Vitro, Cancer, Diabetes, Implants, Tendon, Ligament, Heart Attack

Computer Simulation of Blood Vessel Growth

University of Utah bioengineers showed that tiny blood vessels grow better in the laboratory if the tissue surrounding them is less dense. Then the researchers created a computer simulation to predict such growth accurately – an early step toward treatments to provide blood supply to tissues damaged by diabetes and heart attacks and to skin grafts and implanted ligaments and tendons.

Science

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Energy, Battery, Agriculture, Sugar, Virginia Tech, Environment, Power, power electronics

Sweet Science: Virginia Tech Researcher Develops Energy-Dense Sugar Battery

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A Virginia Tech research team has developed a battery that runs on sugar and has an unmatched energy density, a development that could replace conventional batteries with ones that are cheaper, refillable, and biodegradable.

Science

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energy-efficient ships, Sailing, fluid flow, reduced drag, Superhydrophobicity, rough surface, John Kim, Hyunwook Park, Hyungmin Park, UCLA, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS, American Institute of Physics

Smooth Sailing: Rough Surfaces That Can Reduce Drag

From the sleek hulls of racing yachts to Michael Phelps’ shaved legs, most objects that move through the water quickly are smooth. But researchers from UCLA have found that bumpiness can sometimes be better. They modeled the fluid flow between two surfaces covered with tiny ridges and found that even in turbulent conditions the rough surface reduced the drag created by the friction of flowing water. The researchers report their findings in Physics of Fluids.

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Sandia Conducts First Impact Test in Years of B61 Nonnuclear Components

Sandia National Laboratories conducts a rocket-driven impact test of B61 nonnuclear components.

Science

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Robot, Georgia Institute Of Technology, Manufacturing

Human Arm Sensors Make Robot Smarter

Using arm sensors that can “read” a person’s muscle movements, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a control system that makes robots more intelligent. The sensors send information to the robot, allowing it to anticipate a human’s movements and correct its own. The system is intended to improve time, safety and efficiency in manufacturing plants.

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Battery Development May Extend Range of Electric Cars

Electric cars could travel farther on a single charge and more renewable energy could be saved for a rainy day if lithium-sulfur batteries can last longer. PNNL has developed a novel anode that could quadruple the lifespan of these promising batteries.

Science

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Lithium Ion, Lithium Ion Batteries, Batteries, Energy, Software

WUSTL Engineers Provide Free Code to Help Build Better Batteries

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Lithium-ion batteries, such as those used in electric vehicles, are in high demand, with a global market value expected to reach $33.1 billion in 2019. But their high price and short life need to be addressed before they can be used in more consumer, energy and medical products. Venkat Subramanian, PhD, associate professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering, and his team are working to solve this problem buy developing optimal charging profiles for the batteries.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Architecture, Designer, Design, Engineering, 3D, Three Dimensional, Prototype, product design, Model

Architects, Designers and Engineers Use 3-D Printers to Make Research Come to Life

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Kansas State University architects, designers and engineers are developing ideas from concept to prototype using some of the latest 3-D printers.

Science

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exfoliate, tungsten diselenide, titanium disulfide, Chalcogenides, dichalcogenides, molybdenum disulfide, two-dimensional, printable photonics, Electronics

Novel Exfoliation Method Developed by NUS Chemists Paves the Way for Two-Dimensional Materials to Be Used in Printable Photonics and Electronics

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A team of scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has successfully developed a method to chemically exfoliate molybdenum disulfide crystals into high quality monolayer flakes, with higher yield and larger flake size than current methods.

Science

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Electrochemistry, Battery, operando, in situ TEM, transmission electron microscopy

Batteries as They Are Meant to Be Seen

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Researchers have developed a way to microscopically view battery electrodes while they are bathed in wet electrolytes, mimicking realistic conditions inside actual batteries.







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