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Science

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Orchid, native orchids, North American Orchid Conservation Center , U.S. Botanic Garden, Fungi, Earth Optimism Summit, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Smithsonian Conservation Commons

Orchids and Fungus: A Conservation Connection

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Orchids make up 10 percent of the world's plant species; more than 50 percent of native orchids in North America are listed as threatened or endangered in some part of their home range. Botanist Dennis Whigham and his colleagues at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) in Edgewater, Md., are doing their part to conserve these beautiful flowers by studying the interactions between orchids and fungi.

Science

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Climate Change, Ecology, Terrestial biology, Mushrooms, Grass and carbon, grass research, Carbon, Carbon Dioxide

Researchers Find Mushrooms May Hold Clues to Effect of Carbon Dioxide on Lawns

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Since the Industrial Revolution, the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has rapidly increased. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire set out to determine how rising carbon dioxide concentrations and different climates may alter vegetation like forests, croplands, and 40 million acres of American lawns. They found that the clues may lie in an unexpected source, mushrooms.

Science

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carbon market, Forestry, Old Growth Forests, old growth , Climate Change, forest ecology, Forestry Research, UVM, Northern Forest, selection silviculture, forest restoration, Cap And Trade, Carbon capture & sequestration

For New Carbon Markets, Try Old Growth

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A fifteen-year study in Vermont shows that imitating old-growth forests enhances carbon storage in managed forestland far better than conventional forestry techniques.

Science

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Bumblebees Boost Blueberry Yield

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This good news comes as Florida growers head into the heart of blueberry season.

Science

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mass spectometry, laser ablation , isotopic analysis, isotopi, Fossilization

New Lab Helps Scientists Study the Earth’s Oldest Fossils, Minerals, Rocks

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A new facility at the University of Arkansas combines laser ablation and mass spectrometry for quick, efficient analysis of trace elements and radiogenic isotopes.

Science

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Discovery of New Ginger Species Spices Up African Wildlife Surveys

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Scientists from WCS have discovered a new species of wild ginger, spicing up a wave of recent wildlife discoveries in the Kabobo Massif – a rugged, mountainous region in Democratic Republic of Congo.

Science

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NSLS-II, Fungus, Plants

Investigating the Benefits of Cooperation

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Tiny strands of fungi weave through the roots of an estimated nine out of 10 plants on Earth, an underground symbiosis in which the plant gives the fungus pre-made sugars and the fungus sends the plant basic nutrients in return. Scientists are interested in enhancing this mechanism as a way to help plants grow on nutrient-poor lands.

Medicine

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Pavlovian response, NEURON ACTIVITY, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Tourette Syndrome, Learning

Study Identifies Brain Cells Involved in Pavlovian Response

UCLA scientists have traced the Pavlovian response to a small cluster of brain cells -- the same neurons that go awry during Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Tourette syndrome. The research could one day help scientists find new approaches to diagnosing and treating these neurological disorders.

Science

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ants, Mulch, soil moisture, soil aggregate

Making “Mulch” Ado of Ant Hills

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Research undertaken by scientists in China reveals that ants are hardworking and beneficial insects. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil.

Science

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Seal Beach, California, Wetlands, Earthquakes, paleoseismology, U.S. Geological Survey

Sinking of Seal Beach Wetlands Tied to Ancient Quakes

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When geologists went in search for evidence of ancient tsunamis along Southern California’s coastal wetlands, they found something else. Their discoveries have implications for seismic hazard and risk assessment in coastal Southern California.







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