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Medicine

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Genomics, Genetics, Neurofibromatosis

Forecasting the Future of Genomics

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Medicine

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CRISPR-Cas9, genetic, Eye Disease, Ophthalmology, Retinitis Pigmentosa

Using CRISPR to Reverse Retinitis Pigmentosa and Restore Visual Function

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Using the gene-editing tool CRISPR/Cas9, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health, with colleagues in China, have reprogrammed mutated rod photoreceptors to become functioning cone photoreceptors, reversing cellular degeneration and restoring visual function in two mouse models of retinitis pigmentosa.

Science

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Cohesin, DNA, loop extrusion, Chromatin

Looping the Genome: How Cohesin Does the Trick

DNA molecules in the cells‘ nuclei are neatly folded into loops. This serves to wrap them up tightly, but also to bring distant gene regulatory sequences into close contact. In a paper published this week by NATURE, scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna describe how cohesin might do the trick.

Medicine

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San Diego, Palm Beach, Neuroscience, Neurotransmission, Brain

Closer Look at Brain Circuits Reveals Important Role of Genetics

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in La Jolla have revealed new clues to the wiring of the brain. A team led by Associate Professor Anton Maximov found that neurons in brain regions that store memory can form networks in the absence of synaptic activity.

Medicine

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Pasricha, Kulkarni, Gastroenterolgy, GUT, Nerve, Genetics

Hopkins Researchers Discover Birth-And-Death Life Cycle of Neurons in the Adult Mouse Gut

Johns Hopkins researchers today published new evidence refuting the long-held scientific belief that the gut nerve cells we’re born with are the same ones we die with.

Medicine

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Value in Health, Breast Cancer, Hereditary Breast Cancer, multigene test

For Women at Risk of Hereditary Breast Cancer, Multigene Test Could Help Extend Life Expectancy

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Value in Health, the official journal of the ISPOR, announced today the publication of new research indicating that testing for variants in 7 cancer-associated genes (versus the usual process of testing in just 2 genes) followed by risk-reduction management could cost-effectively improve life expectancy for women at risk of hereditary breast cancer.

Medicine

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genes, Chromosome, Chromosome 19, Barbara R. Migeon, Barbara Migeon

For Keeping X Chromosomes Active, Chromosome 19 Marks the Spot

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After nearly 40 years of searching, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a part of the human genome that appears to block an RNA responsible for keeping only a single X chromosome active when new female embryos are formed, effectively allowing for the generally lethal activation of more than one X chromosome during development.

Science

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Self-Assembling Polymers, Robot Communication, Converting Methane to Biofuel, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Medicine

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genes, Genetics, Imaging, Real-time imaging, DNA, DNA imaging, imaging breakthroughs, Mazhar Adli, UVA, University Of Virginia, UVA School of Medicine, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Cancer, Cancer Genetics, Genetic Diseases, heritable disease, Gene Function, RNA, Proteins, CRISPR, Gene Editing, Chromatin, chromatin imaging, Live cell imaging, Genome,

UVA Finds Way to View Genes Inside Living Cells

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By mapping out gene locations in 3D, scientists can shed light on cancer and other diseases and potentially find better treatments and new cures.

Medicine

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Smoking and cancer, Lung Cancer

Thorough Genotyping and Repurposed Drugs Key to Treating Small-Cell Lung Cancer, says Cancer Expert

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Cancer expert Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD, Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University, describes the recent progress and future possibilities of treating SCLC.







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