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Climate, Weather

ASU Expert on Climate Available to Comment on New High Temperature Records for Antarctica

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Oroville Dam, Emergency Preparedness, Emergency Preparedness Plans, Flood, Flood Insurance, Disaster, disaster aid, disaster experts, dam failure

How Do You Prepare for an Emergency Like Oroville Dam? SJSU Prof Offers Advice on Managing Natural Disaster Threats

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Science

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Oroville, Oroville Dam, Flood Control, Flooding, Natural Disasters, dam failure, dam safety

Natural Disasters Expert Available to Discuss Oroville Dam Spillway Incident

Science

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Environmental Engineering, Forcast, storm damage

Virginia Tech Expert Says Collapse of Oroville Dam in California Is Virtually Impossible

Virginia Tech expert says the danger at Oroville Dam in California is confined to the spillway. While forecasters expect additional storms into next week, damage to the dam itself is highly unlikely.

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Wave Prediction, Climate Modeling, Hurricanes

Researchers Catch Extreme Waves with Higher-Resolution Modeling

A new Berkeley Lab study shows that high-resolution models captured hurricanes and big waves that low-resolution ones missed. Better extreme wave forecasts are important for coastal cities, the military, the shipping industry, and surfers.

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Climate Change, Sea-level rise, Climate Science, Global Warming, Flooding, Floods, Tidal flooding, Environment, Coasts, Coastal, Shoreline, Rutgers, Rutgers University, New Jersey, Jersey Shore, Northeast, United States, Resilience, Preparedness, Risk Management, Science, Greenland, Antarcica, Antarctic, Ice Sheets, Gulf Of Mexico, Atlantic, Pacific, Oceans, Alaska, Ha

Regional Sea-Level Scenarios Will Help Northeast Plan for Faster-Than-Global Rise

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Sea level in the Northeast and in some other U.S. regions will rise significantly faster than the global average, according to a report released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Moreover, in a worst-case scenario, global sea level could rise by about 8 feet by 2100. Robert E. Kopp, an associate professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Rutgers University, coauthored the report, which lays out six scenarios intended to inform national and regional planning.

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Extreme Space Weather-Induced Blackouts Could Cost US More Than $40 Billion Daily

New study finds more than half the loss occurs outside the blackout zone

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Typhoon Haiyan, Typhoon, Hurricane, Meteorology, Climate Change, Ocean, ocean salinity

Increasing Rainfall in a Warmer World Will Likely Intensify Typhoons in Western Pacific

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An analysis of the strongest tropical storms over the last half-century reveals that higher global temperatures have intensified the storms via enhanced rainfall. Rain that falls on the ocean reduces salinity and allows typhoons to grow stronger.

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Ocean, Hurricane, Climate, Meteorology

More Frequent Hurricanes Not Necessarily Stronger on Atlantic Coast

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Active Atlantic hurricane periods, like the one we are in now, are not necessarily a harbinger of more, rapidly intensifying hurricanes along the U.S. coast, according to new research performed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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Flood, Flooding, Flood Risk, Rainfall, Climate Change, Global Warming, Precipitation, NASA, National Weather Service, U.S. Geological Survey, Hydrology

Flood Threats Changing Across US

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A University of Iowa study finds the threat of flooding is growing in the northern half of the United States and declining in the South. The findings are based on water-height measurements at 2,042 stream and rivers, compared to NASA data showing the amount of water stored in the ground.







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