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Medicine

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immune system activation , donor-recipient matches , Innate Immune System, adaptive immune system, acquired immune system, SIRP-alpha , CD47, monocyte activation , Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Transplantation

Experts Uncover First Molecular Events of Organ Rejection

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Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and the University of Toronto have uncovered the first molecular steps that lead to immune system activation and eventual rejection of a transplanted organ.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 28-Jun-2017 1:00 PM EDT

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Anti-obesity Hormone, Leptin, Hormone Leptin, Protein, Obesity, Cell Metabolism, HMS, Harvard Medical School, Jeffrey Flier, Eleftheria Maratos-Flier, Starvation, Metabolism, obesity gene, Biology, Body Weight

Does the Emperor Have Clothes?

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Decades after the discovery of anti-obesity hormone, scant evidence that leptin keeps lean people lean, scientists caution

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Dna Damage, chilling stress, selective cell death, stem cell survival

NUS Study: Plants Sacrifice “Daughters” to Survive Chilly Weather

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A new study by a team of plant biologists from the National University of Singapore found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.

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Slac, cell, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, structural molecular biology, X-Ray Spectroscopy, lightsource, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source

How a Single Chemical Bond Balances Cells Between Life and Death

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With SLAC’s X-ray laser and synchrotron, scientists measured exactly how much energy goes into keeping a crucial chemical bond from triggering a cell's death spiral.

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Cancer Cells May Streamline Their Genomes in Order to Proliferate More Easily

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Research from the Stowers Institute provides evidence suggesting that cancer cells might streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily. The study, conducted in both human and mouse cells, shows that cancer genomes lose copies of repetitive sequences known as ribosomal DNA. While downsizing might enable these cells to replicate faster, it also seems to render them less able to withstand DNA damage.

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Polycystic Ovaries SY

Study Uncovers Link Between Male Hormones and Metabolic Disease in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Scientists from the University of Birmingham have discovered the link between increased male hormones and metabolic complications such as diabetes and fatty liver disease in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

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Bacteria, Cell Biology, Structural Biology

Study Sheds Light on How Bacterial Organelles Assemble

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and Michigan State University are providing the clearest view yet of an intact bacterial microcompartment, revealing at atomic-level resolution the structure and assembly of the organelle's protein shell. This work can help provide important information for research in bioenergy, pathogenesis, and biotechnology.

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Biology, Biotechnology, Developmental Biology, Regenerative Medicine, gastrointestinal disease, Colon, Cell Biology, Genetics, human pluripotent stem cells, CELL STEM CELL, Cell Press , Science, Research, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, National Institutes , Pediatrics, press release, press release distribution, Children

Lab Grown Human Colons Change Study of GI Disease

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Scientists used human pluripotent stem cells to generate human embryonic colons in a laboratory that function much like natural human tissues when transplanted into mice, according to research published June 22 in Cell Stem Cell. The study is believed to be the first time human colon organoids have been successfully tissue engineered in this manner, according to researchers who led the project.

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Cancer, Stem Cells

Researchers Find Way to Better Use Current Drugs to Target Cancer

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Researchers worked backwards, employing a series of drugs used in the clinic to understand a new way that cancer stem cells can be killed.







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