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New Software Tool Powers Up Genomic Research

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A group of computational biological researchers, led by Stony Brook University’s Rob Patro, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has developed a new software tool, Salmon — a lightweight method to provide fast and bias-aware quantification from RNA-sequencing reads. The research was published in the March 6 edition of Nature Methods. .

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New Mass Effect Game Could Make or Break Franchise, Researchers Say

The fallout from the poorly received ending of the third video game in the popular series Mass Effect could doom the upcoming release of “Mass Effect: Andromeda,” say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology.

Science

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Globus Genomics Begins Its Second Chapter

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When Globus Genomics launched five years ago, biologists were just getting used to the idea of being a “big data” science. At that time, the rapidly falling costs of next-generation sequencing suddenly made large-scale genetics more accessible to life scientists. However, these new methods also brought new challenges, as researchers used to working with small datasets on their desktop computer were faced for the first time with the kind of hard-drive flooding data streams more commonly seen by physicists and astronomers.

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Cybersecurity, Neuromorphic, neuromorphic computing, Cerebral Palsy, Cyber Threats

New Brain-Inspired Cybersecurity System Detects ‘Bad Apples’ 100 Times Faster

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The Neuromorphic Cyber Microscope can look for the complex patterns that indicate specific “bad apples,” all while using less electricity than a standard 60-watt light bulb, due to its brain-inspired design.

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Vision, 3-D

How the Brain Sees the World in 3-D

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We live in a three-dimensional world, but everything we see is first recorded on our retinas in only two dimensions.So how does the brain represent 3-D information? In a new study, researchers for the first time have shown how different parts of the brain represent an object’s location in depth compared to its 2-D location.

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graphene defects, artificial skin, artificial ski, Ultracapacitors, ultraca, Physics

Self-Healing Graphene Holds Promise for Artificial Skin in Future Robots

The study offers a novel solution where a sub-nano sensor uses graphene to sense a crack as soon as it starts nucleation, or after the crack has spread a certain distance. This technology could quickly become viable for use in the next generation of electronics.

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Doomsday, Video Game, Gaming, role playing video game, Computer Science, Big Data, Virtual Reality, Violence, Psychology, ArcheAge, end-of-the-world scenario

People Remain Calm as the World Ends, Video Game Study Suggests

As the world ends, will you lock arms and sing “Kumbayah” or embark on a path of law-breaking, anti-social behavior? A new study, based upon the virtual actions of more than 80,000 players of the role-playing video game ArcheAge, suggests you’ll be singing. The study found that despite some violent acts, most players tended toward behavior that was helpful to others as their virtual world came to an end.

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Raspberry Pi, Retina, Eye Exam, fundus photography

A Pocket-Sized Retina Camera, No Dilating Required

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Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Harvard Medical School have developed a cheap, portable camera that can photograph the retina without the need for pupil-dilating eye drops.

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DHS, S&T, DHS S&T, funding opportunity, COE, Center Of Excellence, Screening, supply chain defense, Innovation, Grants

DHS Announces $35M Funding Opportunity for New Center of Excellence in Cross-Border Threat Screening and Supply Chain Defense

Accredited United States colleges and universities may submit proposals as the Center lead or as an individual partner to work with the lead institution in support of the Center’s activities.

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials; Polymer Chemistry); Technology/Engineering/Computer Science (Electrical Engineering/Electronics)

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Apr-2017 5:00 AM EDT







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