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Medicine

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Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Diabetes, diabetic kidney disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease Is Decoded, Offering New Avenues for Diagnosis and Treatment

Mount Sinai researchers say their study represents hope for a complication considered incurable and deadly

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Democracies’ Track Record in Addressing Inequality Is Thin, Political Scientists Conclude

Democratic government has historically had little impact on wealth inequality, NYU’s David Stasavage and Stanford’s Kenneth Scheve conclude in a new analysis.

Medicine

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Repellant Could Keep Dangerous Beetles Away From Avocado Trees

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Florida avocados bring a $100 million-a-year impact to Florida’s economy, UF/IFAS economists say. They grow almost entirely in southern Miami-Dade County, but growers have battled the laurel wilt fungus, which can kill redbay and avocado trees, since it arrived in Georgia in 2003.

Medicine

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Diabetes, Childhood Obesity, Diabetic Retinopathy, Diabetic Retinal Screening, Pediatric Care, Eye Care, Vision, Ophthalmology

Do eye screening guidelines adequately catch diabetic retinopathy in youth?

By the time current screening recommendations kicked in, 18% of youth with type 1 diabetes already had diabetic retinopathy, according to a study led by University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center.

Science

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Bird behavior, bird ecology, Animal Behavior, Ecological Changes, global warming, climage change

How Migratory Birds Respond to Balmier Autumns?

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To study the migration patterns of white-throated sparrows researchers kept track of how active the birds were by day and night. When the temperatures dropped , the birds all became restless at night, signifying they were in a migratory state. As temperatures raised none of the birds showed signs of migratory restlessness.

Medicine

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Weight, Biological Clock, Obesity

Early Birds May Make Healthier Food Choices Than Night Owls

New Study First to Link Internal Clock to What and When People Eat

Science

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Mass Spectrometry, nanogenerators, Zhong Lin Wang, Chemical Analysis

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Systolic Blood Pressure, H, High Blood Pressure

Intensive Lowering of Systolic Blood Pressure Would Prevent 107,500 Deaths Per Year

Intensive treatment to lower systolic (top number) blood pressure to below 120 would prevent 107,500 deaths per year in the United States, according to a study by researchers at Loyola University Chicago and other centers.

Medicine

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MRI, pacemaker for brain

TSRI Researchers Find Standard Pacemakers and Defibrillators Safe for Mri Using a New Protocol

The MagnaSafe Registry, a new multicenter study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), has demonstrated that appropriately screened and monitored patients with standard or non-MRI-conditional pacemakers and defibrillators can undergo MRI at a field strength of 1.5 tesla without harm.

Medicine

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Resveratrol, intervention for lung aging , prophylactic resveratrol treatments

Resveratrol May Be an Effective Intervention for Lung Aging and the Ultimate Development of Chronic Lung Disease

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Researchers demonstrate, for the first time that inhaled resveratrol treatments slow aging-related degenerative changes in mouse lung. Lung aging, characterized by airspace enlargement and decreasing lung function, is a significant risk factor for chronic human lung diseases.

Medicine

Science

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Organ On A Chip, heart on a chip, alternatives to animal testing, Cardiac Disease, Heart Failure

Organ-on-a-Chip Mimics Heart’s Biomechanical Properties

Scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart’s amazing biomechanical properties in order to study cardiac disease, determine the effects that different drugs have on the heart and screen for new drugs to treat heart ailments.

Medicine

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, OCD, Neurobiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, NIH, National Institutes Of Health (NIH), National Institute Of Mental Health, Northwestern Medicine

OCD-Like Behavior Linked to Genetic Mutation

A new Northwestern Medicine study found evidence suggesting how neural dysfunction in a certain region of the brain can lead to obsessive and repetitive behaviors much like obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).repetitive actions.

Medicine

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Feb-2017 4:00 AM EST

Science

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Forest, urban forests, rural forests, Migration, Ecosystem, Mapping, forest dynamics

Farther From the Forest: ‘Eye-Opening’ Study Shows Rural U.S. Loses Forests Faster Than Cities

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A study published in the journal PLOS ONE says that between 1990 and 2000, the average distance from any point in the United States to the nearest forest increased by 14 percent. The distance can present challenges for wildlife and have broad effects on ecosystems.

Medicine

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Dermatology, Bacteriology, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Microbiome

Transplanting Good Bacteria to Kill Staph

University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers screened 10,000 colonies of bacteria found on the epidermis to determine how many had antimicrobial properties and at what rate these are found on healthy and non-healthy skin. In a paper published in Science Translation Medicine, the team reports isolating and growing good bacteria that produce antimicrobial peptides and successfully transplanting it to treat patients with the most common type of eczema, known as atopic dermatitis.

Medicine

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Duke University, Duke University School of Medicine, Duke Center for Applied Genomics & Precision Medicine, host response, Gene signature, protein signaling, Mass Spectrometry, Mucous, Pathogen detection, Diagnostics, Cold And Flu, Antibiotic Resistance, Flu Pandemic, Global Health

Proteins in Your Runny Nose Could Reveal a Viral Infection

It may seem obvious, but the key to confirming whether someone is suffering from a cold or flu virus might lie at the misery’s source -- the inflamed passages of the nose and throat. Duke Health scientists have identified a group of proteins that, when detected in specific quantities in the mucous, are 86 percent accurate in confirming the infection is from a cold or flu virus, according to a small, proof-of-concept trial published online in the journal EBioMedicine.

Science

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Solar System, Planets, Astronomy, Geoscience, Geology

From Rocks in Colorado, Evidence of a ‘Chaotic Solar System’

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Plumbing a 90 million-year-old layer cake of sedimentary rock in Colorado, a team of scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Northwestern University has found evidence confirming a critical theory of how the planets in our solar system behave in their orbits around the sun. The finding, published Feb. 23, 2017 in the journal Nature, is important because it provides the first hard proof for what scientists call the “chaotic solar system.”

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Neurons, Motivation, Addiction, Decision Making, Cell Biology, Neuroscience

Researchers Uncover Brain Circuitry Central to Reward-Seeking Behavior

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UNC scientists found that as mice learn to associate a particular sound with a rewarding sugary drink, one set of prefrontal neurons becomes more active and promotes reward-seeking behavior while other prefrontal neurons are silenced, and those neurons act like a brake on reward-seeking.

Medicine

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lysosomal disease , Nature, Nature (magazine), Research, Genetics, Therapy, press release, news, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Pediatric, Children

Nature Study Suggests New Therapy for Gaucher Disease

Scientists propose in Nature blocking a molecule that drives inflammation and organ damage in Gaucher and maybe other lysosomal storage diseases as a possible treatment with fewer risks and lower costs than current therapies. Reporting their data Feb. 22, the international research team conducted the study in mouse models of lysosomal storage disease and in cells from blood samples donated by people with Gaucher disease.

Medicine

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Cancer, Immunotherapy, CAR T cells, CRISP/Cas9, CRISPR, CAR T cell, Sloan Kettering, Memorial Sloan Kettering, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Michel Sadelain, Tumor, Cancer Research, genome editing, chimeric antigen receptor cells, chimeric antigen receptors

CAR T Cells More Powerful When Built With CRISPR, MSK Researchers Find

MSK researchers used the genome-editing tool CRISPR to create more potent chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that don't tire as easily when attacking cancer cells. The unexpected findings were published in the journal Nature on February 22 and underscore the potential of genome editing to advance immunotherapy for cancer.







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