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Medicine

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In Alzheimer’s, Excess Tau Protein Damages Brain’s GPS

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Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have linked excess tau protein in the brain to the spatial disorientation that leads to wandering in many Alzheimer's disease patients. The findings, in mice, could lead to early diagnostic tests for Alzheimer's and point to treatments for this common and troubling symptom.

Medicine

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New TSRI Method Could Turbocharge Drug Discovery, Protein Research

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A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has developed a versatile new method that should enhance the discovery of new drugs and the study of proteins.

Science

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Joint Genome Institute, Fungi, Bacteria, fungal-bacterial mutualisms, Department of Energy Office of Science, Bioenergy

Of Mutualism and Lipid Metabolism in Fungi

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Novel mechanism in bacterial-fungal symbiosis could have biodiesel production applications

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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One Night Stand Regrets

How we feel after 1-night stands has a lot to do with our gender -- and evolution.

Medicine

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Cancer, Breast Cancer, cancer side effects

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Jan-2017 9:00 AM EST

Life

Business

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Telecommuting, work, Labor, Family, Workplace, Socioeconomics, Society, Work at home, Employer Employee Relationship, Sociology

Telecommuting Extends the Work Week, at Little Extra Pay

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Telecommuting may not be as advantageous as employees think. A new study shows working from home adds extra hours to the work week, at little additional pay. The findings may change workers’ perceptions of the value of telecommuting and could spur employers to better define the work-at-home workday. Results in the journal Social Forces.

Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

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Air Pollution, Environmental Policy, States, Federalism

Air Polluters More Likely to Locate Near Downwind State Borders

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Indiana University research reveals a pattern of companies strategically locating facilities where wind will carry pollution across state lines, which can allow states to reap the benefits of jobs and tax revenue but share the negative effects -- air pollution -- with neighbors.

Medicine

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physiological monitors, infant monitors, infant physiological monitors, smartphone applications, Consumer Safety, cardiorespiratory health, Neonatology

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Jan-2017 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Cancer Death Rates, Racial Disparity, Hysterectomy

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Jan-2017 12:05 AM EST

Science

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cellular communication, Mobile Phone, Mobile device, terahertz band, Terahertz, Modulator, THz, Engineering

Chip-Sized, High-Speed Terahertz Modulator Raises Possibility of Faster Data Transmission

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Tufts University engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz (THz) frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. The discovery could help fill the “THz gap” that is limiting development of new and more powerful wireless devices that could transmit data at significantly higher speeds than currently possible.

Medicine

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Lap Band Surgery, Adolescents, Obesity

Lap Band Surgery Benefits Very Obese Adolescents

Lap band surgery has significant benefits for severely obese teenagers and, despite its controversial nature, should still be considered as a first option to manage obesity during adolescence, a new study has found.

Medicine

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Surgery, Anticoagulant, Anti Clotting Medication

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Jan-2017 4:00 PM EST

Science

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Climate Change

Climate Change Prompts Alaska Fish to Change Breeding Behavior

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A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska’s most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate.

Medicine

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Critical Care, ICU, Family-centered care, Critical Care Medicine

New Guidelines Seek to Promote Family-Centered Care in the ICU

Critical illness is a stressful and traumatic experience that may have lasting effects on the health of patients and families, even months after discharge from the intensive care unit (ICU). A new set of guidelines for promoting family-centered care in neonatal, pediatric, and adult ICUs will be presented at the Society of Critical Care Medicine's (SCCM) 46th Critical Care Congress, to be held January 21 to 25, 2017, at the Hawaii Convention Center, Honolulu. The guidelines also appear in Critical Care Medicine, SCCM's official journal, published by Wolters Kluwer.

Medicine

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Sports, Neurology, Soccer, Concussion, concussion awareness, concussion in sport, soccer heading

UC Researchers Hypothesize: Could Better Eye Training Help Reduce Concussion in Women’s Soccer?

In a photo analysis study of soccer headers, University of Cincinnati researchers noticed female soccer players had their eyes closed 90 percent of the time. As a first step toward determining if less visual awareness might expose players to a higher risk of injury, the study wanted to quantify whether female athletes closed their eyes more frequently than male counterparts.

Medicine

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protien, Drug Development, Disease Progression

Structure of Atypical Cancer Protein Paves Way for Drug Development

A team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has helped uncover the elusive structure of a cancer cell receptor protein that can be leveraged to fight disease progression.

Science

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oceanic troughs, Ice Sheets, West Antarctica, Glaciers

UCI Researchers Map Oceanic Troughs Below Ice Sheets in West Antarctica

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Irvine, Calif., Jan. 18, 2017 – University of California, Irvine glaciologists have uncovered large oceanic valleys beneath some of the massive glaciers flowing into the Amundsen Sea in West Antarctica. Carved by earlier advances of ice during colder periods, the subsurface troughs enable warm, salty water to reach the undersides of glaciers, fueling their increasingly rapid retreat.

Medicine

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Women's Health, Aging, Cellular Aging, Exercise, Epidemiology, geriatric research, Sedentary Lifestyles

Too Much Sitting, Too Little Exercise May Accelerate Biological Aging

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.

Medicine

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GIST, Cancer, Gastroenterology, Surgery, Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors , Survival

Small Intestine GIST Associated with Better Prognosis in Younger Patients

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Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are tumors that arise is the wall of the digestive tract, and most often occur in the stomach or small intestine. Though more common in later in life, GISTs can occur in adolescents and young adults (AYA) under 40 years old as well. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine report findings from the first population-based analysis of AYA patients with GIST.

Science

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Physics, particle physcis, Bottom quark, Large Hadron Collider, ATLAS Collaboration, ATLAS experiment, Higgs Boson, High Energy Physics, U.S. Department Of Energy, Big Bang

A Quark Like No Other

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A University of Iowa physicist is at the forefront of the search to confirm the existence of a particle believed to give mass to all matter. Her group helped build and operates a sub-detector to search for bottom quarks, which are thought to appear when a Higgs boson decays.







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