Feature Channels:

Quantum Mechanics

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

2-D materials, Quantum Computers, Jing Xia

UCI’s New 2-D Materials Conduct Electricity Near the Speed of Light

Physicists at the University of California, Irvine and elsewhere have fabricated new two-dimensional materials with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics.

Science

Channels:

4-D spectral maps, Structure, Quantum Mechanics, Dimensions, spectroscopic, Molecular Structure, Elad Harel, The Journal Of Chemical Physics

‘GAMERS’ Method Creates Unique 4-D Molecular Spectral Maps

JCP-Harel-spectrum.jpg

Researchers at Northwestern University have created a new method to extract the static and dynamic structure of complex chemical systems. In this context, “structure” doesn’t just mean the 3-D arrangement of atoms that make up a molecule, but rather time-dependent quantum-mechanical degrees of freedom that dictate the optical, chemical and physical properties of the system. They discuss their work in this week’s The Journal of Chemical Physics.

Science

Channels:

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Femtosecond, Quantum Physics

Why Study in Femtoseconds?

The text on this screen may appear stable enough, but every molecule, atom, and electron in it is in constant motion. The laws of quantum physics require that on the atomic scale nothing is ever truly at rest. Nano-sized motion also keeps us warm, cooks our food, lights our smartphones, and enables all of our senses of hearing, sight, smell, taste, and touch.

Science

Channels:

quantum information processing, indistinguishable photons, nitrogen impurity centers, Gallium Arsenide, Semiconductors, isoelectronic trap, Michio Iwezawa, Liao Zhang, Yoshiki Sakuma, Yasuaki Masumoto, University of Tsukuba, National Institute for Materials Science, Applied Physics Letters

‘Indistinguishable Photons’ Key to Advancing Quantum Technologies

Indistinguishable photons are critical for quantum information processing, and a group of researchers in Japan is tapping nitrogen impurity centers found within gallium arsenide to generate them -- making a significant contribution toward realizing a large number of indistinguishable single-photon sources.

Science

Channels:

Molecules, Quantum Mechanics, complex molecules, Mass Spectrometry, imaging detector, Laser, Laser Pulse, ion imaging, Spectroscopy, Ruaridh Forbes, Varun Suresh Makhija, Kevin Veyrinas, Albert Stolow, Jason Lee, Michael B. Burt, Mark Brouard, Claire Vallance, Iain Wilkinson, Rune Lausten, Paul Hockett, University College London, University of Ottawa, Universit

The Inner Lives of Molecules

JCP-Hockett-molecule-images.png

Researchers from Canada, the U.K. and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules. They describe their work in this week’s The Journal of Chemical Physics.

Science

Channels:

University of Vienna, quantum race, Winner, loser, macroscopic world, Order, Physics, quantum operations, Superposition, Austrian Academy of Sciences, experimental quantification, Science Advances

In a Quantum Race Everyone Is Both a Winner and a Loser

Walther_quantum_switch_C_Jonas_Schmle.jpg

Our understanding of the world is mostly built on basic perceptions, such as that events follow each other in a well-defined order. Such definite orders are required in the macroscopic world, for which the laws of classical physics apply. However, in the quantum world orders can be ‘scrambled’. It is possible for different orders of quantum operations to coexist in a superposition. The current work by a team of physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences is the first experimental quantification of such a superposition. It will be published in an upcoming issue of "Science Advances".

Science

Channels:

Roger Penrose, Quantum Mechanics, Artificial Intelligence, consciousness; neuroscience; neural correlates; AI; evolution of life; , Schrodinger Cat Paradox, mental and cognitive disorders, quantum effects , brain functions, Oxford University

Roger Penrose Institute to Form in San Diego

SRPenrose.jpg

A unique institute is being formed to develop and investigate the forward-thinking ideas of eminent British physicist Sir Roger Penrose. To be based in San Diego, California, with collaborations in London and Oxford in the UK, and Tucson, Arizona, the Institute will examine the interplay between quantum mechanics and general relativity and the possible implications on our understanding of consciousness.

Science

Channels:

Obituary, Physics, Particle Physics, Quantum Mechanics, Nobel Prize, Particles, Ion Trap

Hans Dehmelt — Nobel Laureate and University of Washington Professor Emeritus — Has Died at Age 94

Dehmelt01.jpg

Hans Georg Dehmelt, Nobel physics laureate and professor emeritus at the University of Washington, died in Seattle on March 7, 2017 at age 94. Dehmelt was a celebrated scientist who developed methods to isolate atoms and subatomic particles and measure their fundamental properties with high accuracy.

Science

Channels:

Laser, Quantum Dot, Nanoscience, Nanotechnology

‘Flying Saucer’ Quantum Dots Hold Secret to Better, Brighter Lasers

QD_laser_3.jpg

Vanderbilt University chemists collaborated in research that ‘squashes’ the shape of nanoparticles to create inexpensive lasers that continuously emit light in a customizable rainbow of colors.

Science

Channels:

University of Vienna, Caslav Brukner, Faculty of Physics, Blurred Times, Quantum World, measuring time, modern physics, space and time, Quantum Mechanics, Einstein, general relativity, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Clocks, PNAS

"Blurred Times" in a Quantum World

brukner_uhr.jpg

When measuring time, we normally assume that clocks do not affect space and time, and that time can be measured with infinite accuracy at nearby points in space. However, combining quantum mechanics and Einstein’s theory of general relativity theoretical physicists from the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences have demonstrated a fundamental limitation for our ability to measure time. The more precise a given clock is, the more it "blurs" the flow of time measured by neighbouring clocks. As a consequence, the time shown by the clocks is no longer well defined. The findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).







Chat now!