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As UF/IFAS CREC Turns 100, It Celebrates Decades Working with Florida Department of Citrus

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“Housing the FDOC and CREC scientists at the same location has brought together the expertise needed to address any issue facing the Florida citrus industry, from the field to the grocery store shelf, and everywhere in between,” said Michael Rogers, director of the Citrus REC.

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Biochar, terra preta, Northern Arizona University, Amazon Basin, Tropics, temperate zone, Bruce Hungate, Ecoss, Center for Ecosystem Science and Society

No Biochar Benefit for Temperate Zone Crops, Says New Report

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Scientists believe that biochar, the partially burned remains of plants, has been used as fertilizer for at least 2,000 years in the Amazon Basin. Since initial studies published several years ago promoted biochar, farmers around the world have been using it as a soil additive to increase fertility and crop yields. But a new study casts doubt on biochar’s efficacy, finding that using it only improves crop growth in the tropics, with no yield benefit at all in the temperate zone.

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Geology

Geologist Discovers Whirlwind Phenomena in Andes Mountains

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Climate Change, alage, global warmin, Science, Atmoshperic

Breaking Climate Change Research (Embargoed) Shows Global Warming Making Oceans More Toxic

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Climate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences entitled, “Ocean warming since 1982 has expanded the niche of toxic algal blooms in the North Atlantic and North Pacific Oceans,” demonstrates that one ocean consequence of climate change that has already occurred is the spread and intensification of toxic algae.

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Utrafast Imaging, Smallest Transistor, Electronic Cyclones, Sensor-Filled Glove, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

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Toward Greener Construction: UW Professor Leads Group Setting Benchmarks for Carbon Across Life of Buildings

The University of Washington-based Carbon Leadership Forum has published the results of its first benchmark study of embodied carbon, or the carbon emissions that occur when extracting, manufacturing and installing building materials. "In the design phrase, our data enables architects and engineers to use carbon, and other environmental impacts, as a performance criteria in addition to common criteria such as cost and strength, when specifying and selecting concrete," said the UW's Kate Simonen -- architect, structural engineer and UW associate professor of architecture, who leads the carbon forum.

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Climate Change, Grand Canyon, vegitation, Drought, NAU, Northern Arizona University

NAU Research Suggests Climate Change Likely to Cause Significant Shift in Grand Canyon Vegetation

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Decreases in river flows and frequency of flooding with future climate warming will likely shift vegetation along the Colorado River in Grand Canyon to species with more drought-tolerant traits.

Life

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Education, Law and Public Policy

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UVA Darden, darden school of business, Business in Society, Flint Water Crisis, World Water Events, Net Impact Club, Peter Debaere, Public Health

Experts Examine Flint Water Tragedy, US Infrastructure Crisis

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During Darden's Net Impact Week, Professor Peter Debaere with CEO Ruffner Page (MBA ’86) and others lead a discussion on Flint: Two Years Later

Science

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Seeds, Bioinspiration, mobility strategies, awn, soil digging, Humidity, natural design, Mechanics, granular drag, Wonjong Jung, Sung Mock Choi, Wonjung Kim, Ho-Young Kim, Seoul National University, Sogang University, PHYSICS OF FLUIDS

Nature Plants a Seed of Engineering Inspiration

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Researchers in South Korea have quantitatively deconstructed what they describe as the “ingenious mobility strategies” of seeds that self-burrow rotationally into soil. Seeds maneuvered to dig into soil using a coiled appendage, known as an awn, that responds to humidity. The team investigated this awn’s burrowing and discovered how the nubile sprouts seem to mimic a drill to bury themselves. Their findings, published in Physics of Fluids, could have dramatic implications for improving agricultural robotics.

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Climate Change, Delta, Coast, Mississippi River, Marshes

Research Sheds New Light on Forces That Threaten Sensitive Coastlines

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Wind-driven expansion of marsh ponds on the Mississippi River Delta is a significant factor in the loss of crucial land in the Delta region, according to research by scientists at Indiana University and North Carolina State University. The study found that 17 percent of land loss in the area resulted from pond expansion.







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