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Testicular Cancer, men's health month, Men's Health Cancer Prevention, Rutgers University, New Jersey

Rutgers Cancer Institute Experts Highlight Testicular Cancer Awareness During Men's Health Month

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While the risk of developing testicular cancer is low, every man should understand some basic facts about this disease. Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey experts share more about the disease, which is the most common malignancy among men ages 15 to 35.

Medicine

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Whitehead Institute, Jing-Ke Weng, Herbal Medicine, Breastfeeding, milk production, Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation

Whitehead’s Weng Receives Grant From Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation to Study Herbs That May Boost Mothers’ Milk

Many cultures traditionally use herbs believed to increase milk supply – so called galactagogues – although scientific data are lacking. Now Whitehead Institute Member Jing-Ke Weng and the Family Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation are teaming up to explore the effects of galactagogues on milk production.

Medicine

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Mammograms, American College of Radiology, society of breast imaging, Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Screening, Mammography

Breast Cancer Special Report in NEJM Shows Why Women 40-49 Should Get Regular Mammograms

Lannin and Wang, published June 8 in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed that younger women of screening age are more likely to develop aggressive breast cancers than older women. This added risk reinforces why women should start annual mammography screening at age 40.

Medicine

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Fibroids, Miscarriage

Vanderbilt-led Study Disputes Link Between Uterine Fibroids and Miscarriage Risk

A 10-year study, led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Katherine Hartmann, M.D., Ph.D., disrupts conventional wisdom that uterine fibroids cause miscarriages.

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Can Routine Hysterectomy Lead to Problems with Constipation or Bladder Control?

In a controversial study published in Diseases of the Colon and Rectum, researchers from Ankara University, Turkey, found that hysterectomy had an increased negative impact on women, including constipation and incontinence. In an accompanying rebuttal from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Gynecology, the question of whether hysterectomy does more harm than good is examined.

Science

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Sex Differences, Obesity, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Metabolic Diseases, Sex And Gender Differences, Tulane University

Does The Sex Of A Cell Matter In Research?

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A Tulane endocrinologist has co-authored a guide in the latest issue of Cell Metabolism to help scientists who study obesity, diabetes or other metabolic diseases better account for inherent sex differences in research.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cell Signaling, Cell Biology, Drug Resistance, Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)

Cancer Cells Send Signals Boosting Survival and Drug Resistance in Other Cancer Cells

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that cancer cells appear to communicate to other cancer cells, activating an internal mechanism that boosts resistance to common chemotherapies and promotes tumor survival.

Medicine

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Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Immunotherapy, T-cell engineering, Cancer Research, ASCO 2017

Roswell Park’s Dr. Kunle Odunsi Gives Update on Ovarian Cancer Immunotherapy Study at ASCO Annual Meeting

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Dr. Kunle Odunsi of Roswell Park Cancer Institute presented an update about an ongoing clinical trial involving T-cell engineering to treat advanced ovarian cancer at the ASCO Annual Meeting in Chicago.

Medicine

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Listeria Monocytogenes, Cancer, Pregnancy Health, Microbiome, Gut Bacteria and Health, Probiotics

Gut Bacteria Could Protect Cancer Patients and Pregnant Women From Listeria, Study Suggests

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Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study, which will be published June 6 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Medicine

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men, Infertility

Men’s Experiences of Infertility Sought for New Study

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Researchers at Leeds Beckett University, together with national charity, Fertility Network UK, are seeking men’s experiences of infertility as part of a new study.







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