Feature Channels:

Cell Biology

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

“Mysterious” Non-Protein-Coding RNAs Play Important Roles in Gene Expression

BergerBoseCellimage2Jan20173.jpg

Enhancers boost the rate of gene expression from nearby protein-coding genes so a cell can pump out more of a needed protein molecule. A mysterious subset of non-coding RNAs - enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) are transcribed from enhancer sequences. Shedding new light on these elusive eRNAs, researchers showed that CBP, an enzyme that activates transcription from enhancers, binds directly to eRNAs to control patterns of gene expression by acetylation.

Medicine

Channels:

Takanari Inoue, Cilia, HAIR, Decapitation, inpp5e, PIP2

Some Cells Need a ‘Haircut’ Before Duplicating

Many of our cells are equipped with a hairlike "antenna" that relays information about the external environment to the cell, and scientists have already discovered that the appearance and disappearance of these so-called primary cilia are synchronized with the process of cellular duplication, called mitosis.

Medicine

Channels:

Zika infection, Sujan Shresta, Center for Infectious Disease

T Cells Join the Fight Against Zika

SpleenZIKVNS2B107percent.jpg

The worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over but many key questions remain, such as why the virus persists in certain tissues after the systemic infection has cleared; how does the immune system counteract the virus and protect against reinfection; what determines the likelihood of long-term complications?

Medicine

Channels:

Ut Southwestern, Tuberculosis, smurf1, Macrophages, Ubiquitin, ubiquitin ligase, Autophagy

UT Southwestern Scientists Identify Protein Central to Immune Response Against Tuberculosis Bacteria

MichaelShiloh.jpg

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have identified a protein that is central to the immune system’s ability to recognize and destroy the bacterium responsible for the global tuberculosis (TB) epidemic.

Medicine

Channels:

Graft-versus-host disease

Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers Develop Novel Treatment to Prevent Graft-Versus-Host-Disease

TAMPA, Fla. – Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is the leading cause of non-relapse associated death in patients who receive stem cell transplants.  In a new study published as the cover story in Science Translational Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers show that a novel treatment can effectively inhibit the development of GVHD in mice and maintain the infection- and tumor-fighting capabilities of the immune system.

Medicine

Channels:

Bacteria, Streptococci, Medicinal Chemistry, Pharmacognosy

Manipulating Signals in Bacteria Could Reduce Illnesses

FederleVertical-1-270x4061.jpg

The University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy has received a five-year, $1.25 million federal grant to continue its research into how bacteria that cause streptococcal infections can be manipulated.

Medicine

Channels:

In Vitro Gametogenesis, IVG, Reproductive Technology, Experimental Reproductive Technology, Infertility Treatments, Infertility, Embryonic Stem Cell, IVG Legality, Experimental Technique, Experimental, Embryo, IVG Therapy, gene modification, Reproductive Legality

The Promise and Peril of Emerging Reproductive Technologies

Oocytes-75017.jpg

In-vitro gametogenesis is an experimental technique that allows scientists to grow embryos in a lab by reprograming adult cells to become sperm and egg cells.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Growing More Nutritional Strawberries in Kansas, Help for Eating Disorder Patients, Hot Weather Not to Blame for Salmonella on Egg Farms, and More in the Food Science News Source

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

Medicine

Channels:

Researchers Find a Potential Target for Anti-Alzheimer's Treatments

130601_web.jpg

Scientists at the University of Luxembourg have identified a gene that may provide a new starting point for developing treatments for Alzheimer's disease.

Medicine

Channels:

C Diff, Stem Cell Transplant, Cancer, Antibiotic, Antibiotic Stewardship , Antibiotic Resistance

Walking the Tightrope

CDiff.jpg

Antibiotic use represents a special challenge, in which too much of a good thing can be dangerous to public health as a whole. The fight against a common, costly, hospital-acquired infection known as Clostridium difficile, or C. diff offers an illuminating case study in the area of so-called antibiotic stewardship.

Medicine

Channels:

mRNA, Protein Synthesis

Direct Communication Between Cell’s Surveillance and Protein Synthesizing Machinery Eliminates Genetic Errors

New research out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine describes a mechanism by which an essential quality control system in cells identifies and destroys faulty genetic material. The findings were published online December 23 in Nature Communications.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Plus-Sized Fly: A Model to Understand the Mechanisms Underlying Human Obesity

130506_web.jpg

The fly sheds light on how the brain acts to signal 'fullness' and the possibility of conferring resilience against the impact of high-fat diets

Medicine

Channels:

Roswell Park, Prostate Cancer, androgen-deprivation therapy

Unique Gene Signature Predicts Potentially Lethal Prostate Cancers

Standard therapy for prostate cancer, the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men, is based on blocking androgens, the male sex hormones. However, for some men, prostate cancer recurs despite androgen-deprivation therapy. A team of scientists led by Irwin Gelman, PhD, Professor of Oncology in the Department of Cancer Genetics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, has identified an 11-gene signature unique to advanced recurrent prostate cancer that they believe will help to identify these aggressive and potentially fatal prostate cancers sooner. The findings have been published online ahead of print in the journal Oncotarget.

Medicine

Channels:

Gene Mutations, carcijnogens, DNA

Roswell Park Researchers Offer Novel Insight Into Genetic Changes Leading to Cancer

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Predisposition to cancer and cancer progression can result from gene mutations that cause elevated rates of genetic damage. Similarly, carcinogens, including some that are used in chemotherapy during cancer treatment, act by damaging the DNA. A new study from Roswell Park Cancer Institute offers insights into the mechanisms that can lead to genetic mutations and proposes opportunities for developing prognostic tests for specific blood disorders and blood cancers based on these striking findings. The study has been published online ahead of print in the journal PLOS Genetics.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Troy, Byzantine, Diseases, Ancient, Health, DNA, Genome

Byzantine Skeleton Yields 800-Year-Old Genomes From a Fatal Infection

skeleton.jpg

Writing this week (Jan. 10, 2017) in the journal eLife, a team led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Caitlin Pepperell and McMaster University's Hendrik Poinar provides insight into the everyday hazards of life in the late Byzantine Empire, sometime around the early 13th century, as well as the evolution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a common bacterial pathogen.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Basic Energy Sciences, SSRL, Advanced Light Source, ALS, Plexxikon , Plexxikon Inc, Tumors, Cancer, Cancer Therapy, Cancer Therapies, Nature, BRAF inhibitors, Medical Treatment, Medical Treatments, Drugs, Tumor Growth, Tumor Growth Factors, vemurafenib, debrafenib, Melanoma

Translating Basic Biological Research to Cancer Drug Discovery

BES-2016-12-c-lrg.jpg

New information on the details of a key protein, obtained using DOE user facilities, could help scientists design ways to inhibit tumor growth without activating other tumor-producing pathways.

Medicine

Channels:

Pancreas Cancer, Pancreas, Pancreatic Cancer, Pancreatic Surgery, pancreatic cancer research, Pancreatic Cancer Surgery, pancreatic cancer therapies, Pancreatic Cancer Action Network , Pancreatic cancer stem cells, Translational Cancer Research, Translational bioinformatics, Cancer Biomarkers, Pancreatic cancer biomarkers, cancer neoplasms, pancreatic c

World Renowned Surgeon and Researcher to Lead New Pancreatic Cancer Center at NYU Langone

SIMEONE_Diane4x5_4068.jpg

NYU Langone Medical Center has announced that internationally recognized surgeon and scientist Diane M. Simeone, MD, will join its Perlmutter Cancer Center on March 1 to serve as associate director for translational research and to lead its newly established pancreatic cancer center.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Charlotte Sumner, nusinersen, Therapy, Johns Hopkins, mice, SMN, FDA, drug, DNA, RNA, Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Experiments in Mice May Help Boost Newly FDA-Approved Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

sma_mouseWEB.jpg

Johns Hopkins researchers along with academic and drug industry investigators say they have identified a new biological target for treating spinal muscular atrophy.

Science

Channels:

Bumblebee, neonicotinoids, imidacloprid

Neonicotinoid Pesticide Affects Foraging and Social Interaction in Bumblebees

Booth_bumblebees.jpg

linked changes in social behavior with sublethal exposure to the neonicotinoid pesticide, imidacloprid.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Antibody, B Cell Receptor, Differentiation, germinal center

Tailored Organoid May Help Unravel Immune Response Mystery

Cornell and Weill Cornell Medicine researchers report on the use of biomaterials-based organoids in an attempt to reproduce immune-system events and gain a better understanding of B cells.







Chat now!