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Medicine

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Muscle, Chemotherapy side effects, Breast Cancer, Sarcopenia

Measuring Patients' Muscles to Predict Chemotherapy Side Effects

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UNC Lineberger researchers and colleagues report in the journal Clinical Cancer Research that a measure of muscle mass and muscle quality developed at UNC could potentially help doctors better identify patients at high risk for toxic side effects that could require hospitalizations.

Medicine

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Nursing, PTSD, Burnout, CPR, Case Western Reserve University, Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, postcode stress, ICU, Critical Care

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Mar-2017 6:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Xinzhong Dong, itch , GRP neuron, Gastrin releasing peptide neuron, pain, Signal

Itch Neurons Play a Role in Managing Pain

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There are neurons in your skin that are wired for one purpose and one purpose only: to sense itchy things. These neurons are separate from the ones that detect pain, and yet, chemical-induced itch is often accompanied by mild pain, such as burning and stinging sensations.

Science

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Camelina, Canola, California crop, water use, Crops, Oilseed, oilseed crops, Biofuel

Cultivating Cool-for-Cash-Crop

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Canola and camelina are cool-season crops that produce oilseeds. Soon they may find a home in California fields as a rotational crop with smart water use and high demand.

Medicine

Science

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Sleep, Neuron, Wake, wakefullness, Circadian, Narcolepsy, Caffeine, Adenosine, neuronal circuit, Brain

BIDMC Scientists Survey the State of Sleep Science

Sleep remains an enduring biological mystery with major clinical relevance, according to a review by clinician-researcher Thomas Scammell, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and colleagues. In recent decades, new technologies have allowed neuroscientists to identify multiple brain circuits that govern the sleep/wake cycle, as well as the factors that can influence it, such as caffeine and light. But the brain’s complexity is still a stumbling block in understanding this ubiquitous and necessary animal behavior, the researchers wrote. Their review appeared today in the journal Neuron.

Medicine

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Sanford Researchers Take Broad Look at Stem Cells

Sanford Research scientists recently published a review article in an issue of Stem Cells Translational Medicine focused on the study of and utility of adult-derived stem cells.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Competition, Workplace Advice

What Do Your Co-Workers Really Think of You?

Everyday in the workplace, colleagues actively compete for a limited amount of perks, including raises, promotions, bonuses and recognition. But new research from Washington University in St. Louis shows that, more than often than not, people fall short in determining which co-workers might be trying to edge them out on the job.

Medicine

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Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, Heart Disease, Pregnancy, Children, Psychology, Neuroscience, Brain Science, Neurology

Researchers Reverse High Blood Pressure in Offspring of Hypertensive Rats

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University of Iowa researchers have demonstrated how harmful health complications passed from mother rats to their offspring can be reversed. The tests may point the way toward preventing the transfer of certain health conditions from human mothers to their children.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, illicit means, Work Conditions, Jobs And Employment, Team composition, Hockey, Group Behavior

What Fighting in the NHL Says About Illicit Roles in Organizations

New research by Johns Hopkins Carey Business School suggests that teams organized with illicit role occupants are more vulnerable and less resilient than teams without them.

Medicine

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Marijuana, marijuana edibles, Drug Use

Lollipop or Edible?

Pot brownies may be a thing of the past as there are new edible marijuana products, or edibles, on the market, including chocolates, candies, and cookies. These products are legally sold in Colorado and Washington, and according to a new study conducted by RTI International, changes to their labels are needed to ensure people know what they are consuming and that they are safely consuming the products.

Medicine

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Pneumonia, Influenza, viral pneumonia, Viruses, Disease Prevention, Asthma, Allergies, Drugs, asthma drugs, Accolate, Singulair, repurposing drugs, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, UVA, UVA School of Medicine, Carter Immunology Center, Beirne B. Carter, Virology, Geriatrics, Infectious Diseases, Thomas J. Braciale, Amber Cardan

Asthma Drugs Could Prevent Deadly Form of Pneumonia, Research Suggests

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Two drugs used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 percent of people who contract it, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found.

Business

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Companies Located Near an IRS Office More Likely to Face an Audit and Avoid More Taxes

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Researchers examined tax records of public companies from fiscal years 1996 to 2012 and found a positive association between a company's geographic proximity to an IRS territory manager’s office and IRS audit likelihood as well as tax avoidance.

Medicine

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Kimmel Cancer Center, Gregg Semenza, Cancer, Chemotherapy

Scientists Identify Chain Reaction That Shields Breast Cancer Stem Cells From Chemotherapy

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Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have identified a biochemical pathway that triggers the regrowth of breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy.

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Popular Heartburn Drugs Linked to Gradual Yet ‘Silent’ Kidney Damage

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Taking popular heartburn medication for prolonged periods may lead to serious kidney damage, even in people who show no signs of kidney problems, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. The drugs are sold under brand names such as Prevacid, Prilosec, Nexium and Protonix.

Science

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quantum critical point, quantum criticality, quantum behavior, Absolute Zero, ultrathin systems, ultralow temperatures, measuring specific heat, thermal phase transition, quantum phase transition

Scientists Create a Nano-Trampoline to Probe Quantum Behavior

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For the first time, scientists have measured quantum criticality by developing a thin membrane suspended in air by very narrow bridges, thereby forming a "nano-trampoline". This enabled specific heat measurements of thin films through a quantum phase transition from a superconducting state to an electrically insulating state close to absolute zero temperatureS.

Medicine

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mosquito-borne disease, ross river virus, zika, global epidemic, Infectious Disease

Risk of Ross River Virus Global Epidemic

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Australia’s Ross River Virus (RRV) could be the next mosquito-borne global epidemic according to a new research study led by the University of Adelaide and The Australian National University.

Medicine

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Microbiome, lung, Bacteria, Pulmonary, Lung Disease

New U-M Study Shows How Bacteria Get Into the Lungs; Findings Could Help Disease Research

Human lungs contain many bacteria, which make up a unique microbiome. New research pinpoints just how they get there, and opens the door to more research on what happens to them – and our bodies – as a result.

Medicine

Science

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counterfeit alcohol, Russia, illegal counterfeit alcohol products, socioeconomic factors, Risky Behavior, Poverty, indifference, Social Networks, homemade alcohol

When Russians Purchase Counterfeit Alcohol

Although counterfeit alcohol is a new phenomenon in most of the world, it has been a longstanding problem in Russia. In 2002, illegal commercial alcohol products totaled more than half of the alcohol retail turnover in that country. More recently, an economic recession has reactivated illicit markets in Russia. While the demand for lower-priced counterfeit alcohol is often linked to economic disadvantages, this research examined whether the problem is more complicated.

Medicine

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coronary angioplasty, PCI, Health Care Costs

Study Reveals Ways to Improve Outcomes, Reduce Costs for Common Heart Procedure

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Hospitals can improve patient care and reduce costs associated with coronary angioplasty if cardiologists perform more of these procedures through an artery in the wrist and if they take steps to discharge such patients on the same day, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Feb-2017 12:00 PM EST







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