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Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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forest fire, Fort McMurray, evacuation stress, Psychology, coping with natural disaster

Evacuation From Wildfire Just the Beginning, Psychological Impact Could Have Long Term Consequences Says UAB Expert

Science

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Model Predicts How Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

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US Northeast's mixed forests unsustainable after 2050 while Cascade Mountains may require subtropical forest species.

Science

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Forest, Ecology, Climate Change, fire, Environment

Drought Alters Recovery of Rocky Mountain Forests After Fire

A changing climate is altering the ability of Rocky Mountain forests to recover from wildfire, according to a new study published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. When warm, dry conditions lead to drought in the years following fires, it impedes the growth and establishment of vulnerable new post-fire seedlings. The study also shows that forest recovery has been negatively affected by increased distances between burned areas and the sources of seeds that typically replace trees lost to fire.

Science

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Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence, South Dakota State University, wildfire management, wildland management, National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy, fire-resistant material, fire-resistant commmunities, firescape, Forest Fires, fire suppression, perscribed burns, fire-prone areas

Wildland Communities Must Learn to Live with Fire

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“If you live in flammable countryside, you’ve got to work with fire. You can’t make it go away,” according to professor Mark Cochrane, a wildfire expert and senior scientist at the Geospatial Sciences Center of Excellence. That means moving from the notion that fires are unnatural and toward a managed approach that involves reintegrating fire as a vital landscape process and building communities that are resilient to fire.

Science

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Wildland, fossil fuel burning, Population

Wildland Fire Emissions Worse in Polluted Areas

UCR study shows biomass grown in areas of poor air quality releases more pollutants when burned than biomass grown in clean air.

Science

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Drones, FAA, firefighting drones, Olin College

Olin Drone Research Aims to Help Fight Wildfires

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Olin College professor working on proof of concept system to deploy drones into a wildfire and send back information in real time, potentially saving lives and livelihoods in the process.

Science

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Fires Burning in Africa & Asia Cause High Ozone in Tropical Pacific

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UMD-led study indicates “biomass burning” may play larger role in climate change than previously realized.

Science

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Arctic ecosystems, Alaska wildfires, Michelle Mack, Northern Arizona

Measuring the Impacts of Severe Wildfires in the Arctic

NAU researcher leads project to measure effects of severe boreal wildfires and the loss of permafrost on ecosystems. The NASA-funded research is part of the Arctic Boreal Vulnerability Experiment.

Science

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Chernobyl, Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, Wildlife Populations, wildlife species, radiation contamination

International Research Team Finds Thriving Wildlife Populations in Chernobyl

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A team of international researchers, including James Beasley, assistant professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and the Warnell School Forestry and Natural Resources, has discovered abundant populations of wildlife at Chernobyl, the site of the 1986 nuclear accident.

Business

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Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, Research, IPO, wildfire management, Organ And Tissue Donation, Ethics

Management Lessons from Wildfire Fighting, Twitter’s Impact on IPOs, and Reversing Repugnant Views of Human Organ Sales Are among Topics in New Johns Hopkins Business Research Magazine

The fall 2015 issue of Changing Business is now available online and in print. The cover story, “Trial by Fire,” examines a study in which workers in various fields can benefit from the lessons that wildfire fighting offers in performing well under unpredictable circumstances. The topic is of particular timeliness as states in the Western U.S. continue to battle spreading wildfires.







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