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Medicine

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Fat, Fat Cell, Preadipocyte, Adipocyte, Obesity

Scientists Closer to Finding What Causes the Birth of A Fat Cell

Just what causes the birth of a human fat cell is a mystery, but scientists using mathematics to tackle the question have come up with a few predictions about the proteins that influence this process.

Science

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Microrna, Protein Production, mRNA

RNA Snippets Control Protein Production by Disabling mRNAs

Short pieces of RNA, called microRNAs, control protein production primarily by causing the proteins’ RNA templates (known as messenger RNA or mRNA) to be disabled by the cell, according to Whitehead Institute scientists.

Medicine

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Microrna, microRNA processing, RNA, Cardiovascular Disease, Cancer, SMAD

Newly-Identified RNA Sequence is Key in MicroRNA Processing

Researchers have uncovered a mechanism that regulates the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs), molecules that regulate cell growth, development, and stress response. The discovery helps researchers understand the links between miRNA expression and chronic disease.

Medicine

Science

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UCLA Jonsson Cancer Center, Mitochondia, RNA, PNPASE, Micheal Teitell, Protein

Scientists Discover Protein that Shuttles RNA into Mitochrondria

Researchers at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine have uncovered a role for an essential cell protein in shuttling RNA into the mitochondria, the energy-producing “power plant” of the cell.

Science

Medicine

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SORTing Out the Links Between Cholesterol and Coronary Heart Disease

The true power of genomic research lies in its ability to help scientists understand biological processes, particularly those that – when altered – can lead to disease. This power is demonstrated dramatically in a pair of papers published today in the journal Nature. In the first, a global team of researchers describes 95 different variations across the genome that contribute in different degrees to alterations in blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels in multiple human populations. In the second report, close examination of just one of these common variants not only reveals the involvement of an unexpected genetic pathway in lipid metabolism but also provides a blueprint for using genomic findings to unravel biological connections between lipid levels and coronary heart disease.

Medicine

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Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, pain, Neurobiology

Molecular Bandit Keeps Pain at Bay

UNC researchers have identified an enzyme that blocks chronic pain by robbing a major pain pathway of a key ingredient. The enzyme could prevent lasting pain after surgery.

Science

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New Tagging Technique Enhances View of Living Cells

A research team led by University of Illinois at Chicago chemist Lawrence Miller has developed a new technique to tag and image proteins within living mammalian cells, providing the clearest, most dynamic microscopic protein-protein interaction in cells ever viewed.

Science

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'Guardian of the Genome': Protein Helps Prevent Damaged DNA in Yeast

Like a scout that runs ahead to spot signs of damage or danger, a protein in yeast safeguards the yeast cells' genome during replication -- a process vulnerable to errors when DNA is copied -- according to new Cornell research.

Medicine

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Scientists Find Gas Pedal – And Brake - for Uncontrolled Cell Growth

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a new way to regulate the uncontrolled growth of blood vessels, a major problem in a broad range of diseases and conditions.

Science

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Biotechnology, Microbiology, Cholera, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Enzyme

Professor Uncovers Mysterious Workings of Cholera Bacteria

Researchers have found that an enzyme in the bacteria that causes cholera uses a previously unknown mechanism in providing the bacteria with energy. Because the enzyme is not found in most other organisms, including humans, the finding offers insights into how drugs might be created to kill the bacteria without harming humans.







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