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Leukemia, Cancer, Genetics, Medicine

Researchers Harness Metabolism to Reverse Aggressiveness in Leukemia

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Researchers have identified a new drug target for the two most common types of myeloid leukemia, including a way to turn back the most aggressive form of the disease.

Medicine

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Protein Interactions, Proteome, Human Genome, BioPlex, protein-coding gene, Protein-to-protein interaction, Human Interactome, BioPlex "Social Network", Harvard Medical School, BioPlex 2.0, Protein Network, Steven Gygi, Interactome, Edward Huttlin, human proteins, Bait Proteins

Social Networking for the Proteome, Upgraded

At a glance: BioPlex network identifies protein interaction partners for more than 5,800 protein-coding genes, representing more than a quarter of the human genome. The network maps over 56,000 unique protein-to-protein interactions among nearly 11,000 proteins, significantly expanding coverage of the human interactome. 87 percent of identified interactions were previously undescribed. BioPlex serves as “social network,” providing functional insights into protein communities involving many areas of biology, from development to disease.

Medicine

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Electrical Brain Stimulation, Optic nerve damage, Dendritic stripping, retinal nerve cells, Repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation , Cell Death, Survivor cells

Current Stimulation May Keep Visual Neurons Alive After Injury – but at a Cost

In a study published in Scientific Reports, researchers from Magdeburg University (Germany) and The Chinese University of Hong Kong report that for rats and mice, repetitive transorbital alternating current stimulation (rtACS) may help preserve visual neurons from cell death after injury.

Medicine

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Blood Test, Healthcare, Infectious Disease, Healthcare Costs, drug-resistant infections, Public Health

New Blood Test Technology Reduces False Readings, Saves Costs, and Improves Care - Live Virtual Press Briefing with Researcher May 16

Research findings to be published about new blood test technology that will greatly reduce errors in labwork and improve care in public health and infectious disease. Press briefing scheduled for May 16, reserve press access to live virtual event now.

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Study Shows Novel Device Significantly Reduces Blood Draw Contamination, Reduces Risks to Patients

A study at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) found that a novel device can significantly reduce contamination of blood cultures, potentially reducing risky overtreatment and unnecessary use of antibiotics for many patients. This approach could also substantially reduce healthcare costs, according to the study. Thousands of U.S. patients get their blood drawn every day for blood cultures in order to diagnose serious infections such as sepsis, which can be a deadly condition. A small but significant percentage of the blood cultures are contaminated, due in part to skin fragments containing bacteria that are dislodged during a blood draw. This leads to false results that can mislead clinicians into thinking a patient has a potentially serious bloodstream infection. The consequences are costly and put patients at risk.

Medicine

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Blood culture, Contamination, Bacterial Infection, Infectious Disease, Emergency Room, blood sample contamination

Virtual Press Briefing: Novel Device Reduces Blood Sample Contamination, Could Save Billions in Health Care Costs

Newswise hosts a virtual live press briefing on upcoming journal study with research results concerning a new blood collection technique that reduces contamination of blood samples and improves treatment outcomes.

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Polymerases Pause to Help Mediate the Flow of Genetic Information

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Stop-and-go traffic is typically a source of frustration, an unneccesary hold-up on the path from point A to point B. But when it comes to the molecular machinery that copies our DNA into RNA, a stop right at the beginning of the path may actually be helpful. Recent research from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research shows that this stop prevents another machine from immediately following the first, presumably to better control the traffic and avoid later collisions.

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Body Donations, A-Fib Scores, Prostate Cancer Screenings, and More in the Healthcare News Source

The latest research, features and announcements in healthcare in the Healthcare News Source

Medicine

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Peter Campochiaro, Gene Therapy, Injections, Therapeutic

New Gene Therapy for Vision Loss Proven Safe in Humans

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In a small and preliminary clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and their collaborators have shown that an experimental gene therapy that uses viruses to introduce a therapeutic gene into the eye is safe and that it may be effective in preserving the vision of people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Medicine

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blood-brain barrier, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome, Clive Svendsen

Scientists Show How Defects in Blood-Brain Barrier Could Cause Neurological Disorder

Scientists for the first time have assembled a "disease in a dish" model that pinpoints how a defect in the blood-brain barrier can produce an incurable psychomotor disorder, Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The findings point to a path for treating this syndrome and hold promise for analyzing other neurological diseases.







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