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Unexpected Role for Epigenetic Enzymes in Cancer

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In a Yale-led study, Qin Yan and his co-authors focused on a family of enzymes — known as KDM5 — that have been shown in previous studies to be involved in cancer cell growth and spreading.

Medicine

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Lung Cancer, Yale Cancer Center, Chemotheraphy, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

Lung Cancer Patients May Benefit From Delayed Chemotherapy After Surgery

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A new Yale study suggests that patients with a common form of lung cancer may still benefit from delayed chemotherapy started up to four months after surgery, according to the researchers.

Medicine

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WOUND CARE HEALING

UCI-Penn Study in Science Reveals Natural Process for Scar-Free Wound Healing

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Irvine, Calif., Jan. 5, 2017 — Scars are often the unwanted and permanent result of wound healing, but University of California, Irvine and University of Pennsylvania researchers have discovered a natural regeneration process that stimulates scar-free skin repair.Their study results, which appear in Science, point the way toward possible clinical treatments for scar-free wound healing, a highly desirable yet unmet need.

Medicine

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Dermatlogy, Wound, Wound Healing, Fat, Hair Cell Regeneration, HAIR, Hair Cells, Myofibroblasts

Using Fat to Help Wounds Heal Without Scars

Doctors have found a way to manipulate wounds to heal as regenerated skin rather than scar tissue. The method involves transforming the most common type of cells found in wounds into fat cells – something that was previously thought to be impossible in humans.

Science

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TSRI Researchers Discover Surprising Process Behind Sense of Touch

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Biologists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered a new mechanism that likely underlies how we feel force or touch.

Medicine

Science

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Optogenetics, Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Biophysics

Optogenetics Breakthrough: UNC Scientists Expand the Use of Light to Control Protein Activity in Cells

Scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a method to control proteins inside live cells with the flick of a switch, giving researchers an unprecedented tool for pinpointing the causes of disease using the simplest of tools: light.

Medicine

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CAR-T, Lymphoma, KTE-C19, Cellular Therapy, Immunotherapy, Moffitt Cancer Center

Immune Cell Therapy Shows Promising Results for Lymphoma Patients, Says Moffitt Researchers

TAMPA, Fla. – Lymphoma is the most common blood cancer. The disease occurs when immune cells called lymphocytes multiply uncontrollably. Cancerous lymphocytes can travel throughout the body and form lymph node tumors. The body has two types of lymphocytes that can develop into lymphoma – B cells and T cells. B-cell lymphomas account for 85 percent of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and 30 percent of those patients are diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

Medicine

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glioblastoma tumor cells, 3D, Tumor Cells, Cancer Cells, Cancer Research, grade IV astrocytoma, Central Nervous System (CNS), Brain, Brain Tumor, American Brain Tumor Association, Cancer cell invasion, Tumor invasion

Graduate Research Explores Glioblastoma Tumor Cells Invasion in 3D Environments

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Wichita State graduate student Pranita Kaphle is researching the migration of cancer cells in a 3D environment. She is targeting glioblastoma multiforme in the brain, a rapid spreading and aggressive high-grade tumor. Kaphle hopes to pursue a career studying the cancer cells and finding a way to inhibit tumor cell invasion.

Science

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Corals, coordinated behaviour

Corals May Show Complex, Coordinated Behavior

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The individual and the group: insignificant alone, awesome together. Like ants in a colony or neurons of a brain, the collective action of single actors can beautifully coalesce into something more complex than the parts.

Science

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anole, adaptive radiation, developmental monitoring

Sticky Toes Provide Clues to Evolution

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Yet, how this key innovation evolved remains a mystery locked within the leathery shell of a lizard egg. Now, Dr. Thomas Sanger at Loyola University in Chicago has developed new techniques to understand more about the process of evolutionary diversification by observing development in real time.

Science

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Toads

The Mystery of the Earless Toads

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More than 200 species of “true toads” have fully functional inner ears, but cannot fully use them because they have lost their tympanic middle ears, the part of the ear which transmits sound air pressures from the outside world to the inner ear. These “earless” toads rely on sounds to communicate, so why would they lose a sense that is key to their survival and reproduction?

Medicine

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Scripps Florida Scientists Expand Toolbox to Study Cellular Function

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Scientists on the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a new tool for studying the molecular details of protein structure.

Medicine

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Glioblastoma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, Immunotherapy, Gene Therapy, Brain Cancer, Cancer, Malignant Brain Tumor, Brain Tumor

Immunotherapy, Gene Therapy Combination Shows Promise Against Glioblastoma

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In a new University of Michigan study, gene therapy deployed with immune checkpoint inhibitors demonstrates potential benefit for devastating brain cancer.

Medicine

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dry eye, Gordon Laurie, University Of Virginia, UVA, University of Virginia School of Medicine, drug, Drugs, Treatment, Tears, Cell Biology, Clinical Trial, Licensing, Startups

New Dry Eye Drug Aims to Treat Cause Rather Than Mask Symptoms

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University of Virginia Health System researchers have developed a potential therapeutic treatment for dry eye, with human testing to start in March. The drug differs from other treatments of dry eye in that it aims to treat the cause of dry eye instead of masking the symptoms. About the drug The drug, Lacripep (TM), is a topical eye drop that functions differently from conventional  approaches.

Medicine

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stem cell clinical trials , Stem Cells, Stem Cell Therapy, Rotator Cuff, rotator cuff repair, Rotator Cuff Tears, Adipose stem cells, FDA Approval, FDA approved

Stem Cell Therapy Trial at Sanford First of Its Kind in U.S. For Shoulder Injuries

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The first FDA-approved clinical trial of its kind in the United States using a person’s own fat-derived adult stem cells to treat shoulder injuries is available at Sanford Health.

Medicine

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Cancer, Cancer Research, Ut Southwestern

Researchers Uncover Mechanism for Cancer-Killing Properties of Pepper Plant

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– UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have uncovered the chemical process behind anti-cancer properties of a spicy Indian pepper plant called the long pepper, whose suspected medicinal properties date back thousands of years.

Medicine

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targeted cancer therapy, Immune Cells, nanoparticle drug delivery

New Technique Uses Immune Cells to Deliver Anti-Cancer Drugs

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Penn State biomedical engineers have created a smart, targeted drug delivery system using immune cells to attack cancers.

Medicine

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Moffitt Cancer Center Researchers Report Promising Clinical Activity and Minimal Toxicities for HER2-Targeted Dendritic Cell Vaccines in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Patients

Immunotherapy is a fast growing area of cancer research. It involves developing therapies that use a patient’s own immune system to fight and kill cancer. Moffitt Cancer Center is working on a new vaccine that would help early-stage breast cancer patients who have HER2 positive disease.

Medicine

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Colorectal Cancer, colitis associated cancer, Tumors, Ulcers, chronic inflammation

Enzyme Could Protect Against Type of Colorectal Cancer By Suppressing Tumors, Study Finds

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An enzyme that plays an active role in inflammation could be a natural way to suppress tumors and ulcers in the colon that are found in colitis associated cancer (CAC), a type of colorectal cancer that is driven by chronic inflammation, according to a new study.

Medicine

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cell, DNA, Dna Damage, Malnutrition, CHORI

Zinc Eaten at Levels Found in Biofortified Crops Reduces ‘Wear and Tear’ on DNA

A new study by researchers from the UCSF Benioff Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI) shows that a modest 4 milligrams of extra zinc a day in the diet can have a profound, positive impact on cellular health that helps fight infections and diseases. This amount of zinc is equivalent to what biofortified crops like zinc rice and zinc wheat can add to the diet of vulnerable, nutrient deficient populations.







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