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Medicine

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Smoking and cancer, Lung Cancer

Thorough Genotyping and Repurposed Drugs Key to Treating Small-Cell Lung Cancer, says Cancer Expert

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Cancer expert Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD, Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University, describes the recent progress and future possibilities of treating SCLC.

Science

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cell extrusion, topological defect, Epithelia

Defects in Epithelial Tissue Organisation – a Question of Life or Death

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Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore at the National University of Singapore have discovered the primary mechanism driving the extrusion of dying cells from epithelial monolayers.

Science

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gene-editing, DNA, CRISPR, Ut Southwestern, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Gene-Editing Alternative Corrects Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

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Gene-editing alternative corrects Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Medicine

Science

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ALS, Lou Gehrig disease, Ataxia, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, Neurodegenative Disease, SCA2, ATX2

Treatment Reverses Signs of Two Degenerative Brain Diseases, ALS and Ataxia, in Mice

Scientists report a significant step toward combatting two degenerative brain diseases that chip away at an individual’s ability to move, and think. A targeted therapy developed by scientists at University of Utah Health slows the progression of a condition in mice that mimics a rare disease called ataxia. In a parallel collaborative study, led by researchers at Stanford University, a nearly identical treatment improves the health of mice that model Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), commonly called Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Science

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smart glasses, tunable lenses, liquid lenses, mechanical actuators, Bluetooth, Focus, Eyesight, eyesight correction, rechargeable battery, adjustable lenses, flexing lenses

Tunable Electric Eyeglasses Bend to the Will of the Wearer

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Engineers funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) have developed glasses with liquid-based lenses that “flex” to refocus on whatever the wearer is viewing.

Science

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DNA, genomic mapping , nanochannels, DNA knots, Genomes, Sequence, base pairs, Aashish Jain, Kevin D. Dorfman, University of Minnesota, BioNano Genomics, Biomicrofluidics

What’s a Knot -- and What’s Not -- in Genomic Mapping

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Genome mapping complements DNA sequencing, offering insight into huge, intact molecules between 150,000 and 1 million base pairs in length. Obtaining measurements of such large segments is not without its challenges, but new research into the physics of nanochannel mapping published this week in the journal Biomicrofluidics, may help overcome a (literal) knot in the process and advance genome mapping technology.

Science

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Biofuels, Methane, Biomass, methane flaring, Cyanobacteria, Biogas

From Moo – to Goo

Scientists have developed a new system to convert methane into a deep green, energy-rich, gelatin-like substance that can be used as the basis for biofuels and other bioproducts, specialty chemicals – and even feed for cows that create the gas in the first place.

Medicine

Science

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HIV, AIDS, Vaccine, Immune, San Diego, Biotech, Biomedical, Los Angeles, Clinical Trial

New Approach Makes Cells Resistant to HIV

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to tether HIV-fighting antibodies to immune cells, creating a cell population resistant to the virus.

Science

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biochemical engineering, stem cell technology , Graphene, Mechanical Engineering

Researchers Use Graphene, Electricity to Change Stem Cells for Nerve Regrowth

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Two Iowa State research groups are combining their expertise to change stem cells for nerve regrowth. The groups -- one led by a mechanical engineer and the other by a chemical engineer -- just published their findings in Advanced Healthcare Materials.

Medicine

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cystic Fibrosis, Thymosin, Thymosin Alpha 1, University of Perugia, University of Rome, Biochemistry, Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Pediatrics, CF, respiratory conditions

Research Uncovers Potential New Treatment to Treat and Stop Progression of Cystic Fibrosis

Researchers published in Nature Medicine from the George Washington University, the University of Perugia, and the University of Rome have discovered a potential new drug to treat and stop the progression of cystic fibrosis. Thymosin α1 is a novel therapeutic single molecule-based therapy that not only corrects genetic and tissue defects, but also significantly reduces inflammation seen in cystic fibrosis patients.







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