Feature Channels:

All Journal News

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Technology, Computer Science, Engineering, Health And Medicine

'5-D Protein Fingerprinting' Could Give Insights Into Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

In research that could one day lead to advances against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, University of Michigan engineering researchers have demonstrated a technique for precisely measuring the properties of individual protein molecules floating in a liquid.

Medicine

Channels:

Kidney Disease, Healthcare Costs, Out-of-Pocket Costs

Kidney Disease Patients Have Higher Out-of-Pocket Costs than Stroke and Cancer Patients

Patients who have chronic kidney disease but are not on dialysis have higher out-of-pocket healthcare expenses than even stroke and cancer patients, according to a study published in BMC Nephrology.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Racial Bias in a Heartbeat: How Signals From the Heart Shape Snap Judgements About Threat

131006_web.jpg

Our heartbeat can increase pre-existing racial biases when we face a potential threat, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

Science

Channels:

Cholesterol, Membranes, Signalling

Researchers Zero-in on Cholesterol's Role in Cells

CHO_Cholesterol_Image1-387x258.jpg

For the first time, by using a path-breaking optical imaging technique to pinpoint cholesterol's location and movement within the cell membrane, chemists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have made the surprising finding that cholesterol is a signaling molecule that transmits messages across the cell membrane.

Medicine

Channels:

Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, PDX1

Study Challenges Potential Pancreatic Cancer Target

A protein thought to fuel pancreatic cancer development plays a much more complicated role, a new study finds. PDX1 is critical for cancer growth, but blocking it may lead to more aggressive tumors.

Science

Channels:

Materials, Turbines, Turbine, JET ENGINE , Alloy, superalloy

Discovery Could Lead to Jet Engines That Run Hotter—and Cleaner

Researchers here have made a discovery in materials science that sounds like something from the old Saturday morning cartoon Super Friends: They’ve found a way to deactivate “nano twins” to improve the high-temperature properties of superalloys that are used in jet engines.The advance could speed the development of powerful and environmentally friendly turbine engines of all sorts, including those used for transportation and power generation.

Science

Channels:

Discovery Adds Rock Collecting to Neanderthal's Repertoire

130842_web.jpg

Interesting limestone rock found at Croatian Neanderthal site

Medicine

Channels:

Merkel cell carcinoma , immune therapy, Immunotherapy, Skin Cancer, Cancer, “killer” (CD8) T cells , Cd8 T Cells, Paul Nghiem, MCC, KLL, Natalie Miller, KLL-specific T cells

Immune Responses Against a Virus-Related Skin Cancer Suggest Ways to Improve Immunotherapy

PaulNghiem_19349.JPG

Researchers at Seattle’s Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington say a new study suggests ways to improve immune therapy for certain cancers including a virus-associated form of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare, aggressive skin cancer.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Vaccine, Immune System, pathogenic particles, Biophysics, biophysical

Biophysics Plays Key Role in Immune System Signaling and Response

krish-roy.jpg

How big you are may be as important as what you look like, at least to immune system cells watching for dangerous bacteria and viruses.

Medicine

Channels:

Urban Health, Population Health, Cities, Policy

First-Ever Online Data Tool Allows City Leaders to Examine Health of Their Urban Populations & Take Action

CityHealthDashboard_Homepage.png

Responding to demands from cities across the country, NYU School of Medicine’s Department of Population Health, NYU’s Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service, and the National Resource Network, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, are launching the City Health Dashboard. The online data visualization tool will greatly improve city-level understanding of health and empower mayors, city managers, health officials, and other local stakeholders to enact policies that target the risk factors and health conditions that most impact their communities.

Medicine

Channels:

HIV Therapy Could Be Contributing to Syphilis Outbreak

condom770_1.jpg

Drugs used to treat HIV could affect how the body responds to syphilis, inadvertently contributing to a current outbreak, a new study suggests.

Science

Channels:

When It Comes to Mating, Fruit Flies Can Make Rational Choices

fruit_flies_colored.jpg

In a paper published Jan. 17 in the journal Nature Communications, University of Washington researchers report that fruit flies — perhaps the most widely studied insect in history — show signs of rational decision-making when choosing a mate.

Medicine

Channels:

Hospital Costs, Physician Charges, Health Care Costs, Health Insurance

Patients Face ‘Surprise’ Medical Bills From Out-of-Network Specialists

The average anesthesiologist, emergency physician, pathologist and radiologist charge more than four times what Medicare pays for similar services, often leaving privately-insured consumers stuck with surprise medical bills that are much higher than they anticipated, new research in JAMA suggests.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Monkeys, Rhesus Monkeys, Calories, Diet, Longevity, Aging

Calorie Restriction Lets Monkeys Live Long and Prosper

monkey_diet_study09_56571.jpg

Settling a persistent scientific controversy, a long-awaited report shows that restricting calories does indeed help rhesus monkeys live longer, healthier lives. A remarkable collaboration between two competing research teams — one from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and one from the National Institute on Aging — is the first time the groups worked together to resolve one of the most controversial stories in aging research.

Medicine

Channels:

Genome Sequencing, Newborn Screening Programs

Are You Ready to Explore Baby’s Genome?

babygenomev2.jpg

A national consortium of clinical geneticists is studying the ins and outs of potentially using genome sequencing for newborn health screenings and beyond.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Synthetic Biology, risk, Modeling, Policy, Research, Risk Assessment, Regulation

New Tool Can Help Policymakers Prioritize Information Needs for Synthetic Biology Tech

New technologies are developed at a rapid pace, often reaching the market before policymakers can determine how they should be governed. Now researchers have developed a model that can be used to assess emerging synthetic biology products to determine what needs to be done to inform future policies.

Medicine

Channels:

Affordable Care Act (ACA), Health Insurance, medicaid expansion, Mental Health, Substance Abuse

More with Mental Illness and Substance Use Disorders Have Health Insurance

Significantly more people with mental illness and substance use disorders had insurance coverage in 2014 due to the expansion of health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), but many barriers to treatment remain, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

religion and American culture, Religion, Evangelicals, Gun Control, Gun Culture

Religious Involvement Lessens Likelihood of Owning a Handgun

20170113yamane2057.jpg

Americans who are more involved in religious congregations are less likely to own handguns, according to a new study by Wake Forest University sociologist David Yamane.

Medicine

Channels:

William McEvoy, McEvoy, Blood Pressure, Heart, Calcium

Personalized Treatment for Those in Blood Pressure ‘Gray Zone’

BloodPressureCheck-Copy.jpg

Using data from a national study, Johns Hopkins researchers determined that using heart CT scans can help personalize treatment in patients whose blood pressure falls in the gray zone of just above normal or mild high blood pressure.

Science

Channels:

Kazakhstan, Wildlife, Tigers, Extinction, Central Asia, Biological Conservation

Tigers Could Roam Again in Central Asia, Scientists Say

1ESFMikhailYurievichPaltsyn.Tiger.jpg

Caspian tigers, some of the largest cats that ever lived, roamed through much of Central Asia before they were designated as extinct in the middle of the 20th century. But there is a chance that tigers — using a subspecies that is nearly identical, genetically, to the Caspian — could be restored to Central Asia.







Chat now!