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Science

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nuisance flooding, Climate Change, Amir AghaKouchak, Sea Level Rise, Hamed Moftakhari, Richard Matthew, Brett Sanders

Over Time, Nuisance Flooding Can Cost More Than Extreme, Infrequent Events

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Irvine, Calif., Feb. 21, 2017 – Global climate change is being felt in many coastal communities of the United States, not always in the form of big weather disasters but as a steady drip, drip, drip of nuisance flooding.According to researchers at the University of California, Irvine, rising sea levels will cause these smaller events to become increasingly frequent in the future, and the cumulative effect will be comparable to extreme events such as Hurricane Katrina or Superstorm Sandy.

Medicine

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Immunotherapy, adoptive t cell transfer, Cancer, Metastatic Melanoma, T Cell, Immune Cells

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Feb-2017 2:00 PM EST

Medicine

Life

Pop Culture

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Actors with Disabilities Go to Hollywood Festival, Sbarro Health Research Org Praises Filmmakers

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The organization is praising a group of Italian filmmakers for their contribution to medicine through the arts. Their film, Ho Amici In Paradiso [I Have Friends in Heaven], will screen this week at the Los Angeles Italia Film, Fashion, and Art Fest.

Medicine

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Diabetes, Heart Disease, Atheroclerosis

Researchers Implicate Suspect in Heart Disease Linked to Diabetes

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Scientists have struggled to trace the specific biology behind diabetes-associated heart disease risk or find ways to intervene. Now, UNC researchers have hunted down a possible culprit – a protein called IRS-1, which is crucial for the smooth muscle cells that make up veins and arteries.

Business

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Mobile Marketing, marketing campain, geolocating , price targeting, competitive targeting

Competing for Customers at the Cinema

Of 16,000 subjects who received at least one text message offer, 535 purchased a voucher at one of the two theaters that day, which is a promotional response of 3.3%. This was a significant boost in sales, proving that the discounts were effective in in-creasing business.

Science

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Melanoma, Cancer, Tumor Microenvironment

Penn and Wistar Researchers Find “Sweet Spot” Where Tissue Stiffness Promotes Cancer’s Spread

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University of Pennsylvania and Wistar scientists have studied the physical feedback mechanisms between cancer cells and their environment and described how this interplay allows the migration and invasion of tumor cells.

Medicine

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Drugs That Alter Inhibitory Targets Offer Therapeutic Strategies for Autism, Schizophrenia

Researchers at SUNY Downstate recently discovered that an inhibitory brain receptor triggers synaptic pruning in adolescence. Drugs that selectively target these receptors, when administered during adolescence, can alter synapse number, with possible implications for the treatment of autism and schizophrenia.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Stem Cell Therapy, Regeneration Of Hair Cells, Deafness

New Technique Generates High Volume of Sensory Cells Needed for Hearing

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In 2013, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers restored partial hearing to mice by regenerating hair cells — tiny, sound-sensing cells in the ear, which are lost through noise damage, age, etc., and do not regenerate on their own — by converting stem cells found in the ear into hair cells. However, the success of restoring hearing through this approach was limited by the small number of cells that could be turned into hair cells. In a new study in Cell Reports, a research team from Mass. Eye and Ear, Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT has shown that they can augment the number of those cells, and then convert that large population into hair cells, lending hope that full hearing can be restored to those with hearing loss due to damaged hair cells.

Medicine

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“Designer Cardiovascular Therapies:” New Ways on the Horizon to Fix a Broken Heart

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Unlike the self-repair abilities of our skin, bone and other tissues, which can readily heal and rebuild themselves after injury, evolution has left the mammalian heart with relatively little regenerative capacity. Finding new ways to repair and protect a broken heart is the core of labs like those of physician-scientists Jon Epstein, MD, executive vice dean and chief science officer at Penn Medicine, and Rajan Jain, MD an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine.

Science

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Materials, Glass Display, Physics, Chemistry

Understanding ‘Glass Relaxation’ and Why It’s Important for Next-Generation Displays

Display manufacturers can account for a certain level of relaxation in the glass, referring to the intermolecular rearrangement, if it’s known and reproducible. But fluctuations in this relaxation behavior tend to introduce uncertainty into the manufacturing process, possibly leading to misalignment of pixels within displays. Now, researchers reports on a new modeling technique to quantify and predict glass relaxation fluctuations, important for next-generation displays.

Medicine

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Testosterone Treatment Improves Bone Density and Anemia, May Lead to Cardiac Risk

It is commonly known that testosterone levels decrease as men age, but until last year, little was known about the effects of testosterone treatment in older men with low testosterone. Today, in a group of papers published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) and JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers found that testosterone treatment improved bone density and anemia for men over 65 with unequivocally low testosterone. However, testosterone treatment did not improve cognitive function, and it increased the amount of plaque buildup in participants’ coronary arteries.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Breast Cancer Treatment, Precision Medicine, Physiology, genes, Gene Expression, triple-negative breast cancer, HER2 breast cancer, Breast Cancer Advances, Afatinib, trametinib, proof of concept

The Way Breast Cancer Genes Act Could Predict Your Treatment

A Michigan State University breast cancer researcher has shown that effective treatment options can be predicted based on the way certain breast cancer genes act or express themselves.

Medicine

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Miscarriage, Pregnancy, Food Pathogens, Listeria, Obstetrics

Listeria May Be Serious Miscarriage Threat Early in Pregnancy

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Listeria, a common food-borne bacterium, may pose a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stages of pregnancy than appreciated, according to researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine studying how pathogens affect fetal development and change the outcome of pregnancy.

Medicine

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Childhood Obesity, BMI

Helping Parents Understand BMI May Lead to Positive Changes in Childhood Obesity

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Getting children to move more is a team effort. A new study, published in Childhood Obesity, found parents were more likely to change their child’s lifestyle when schools provided educational materials along with the results of their child’s body mass index screening.

Life

Education

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Four NYU Faculty Win Sloan Foundation Research Fellowships

Four New York University faculty have been awarded fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Transgender, political representation, LGBTQ, LGBTQ issues, Candidates, Public Opinion, transgender political candidates

Transgender Political Candidates Still Likely Face an Uphill Battle, Study Finds

A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher found 35%-40% of adults would oppose a transgender candidate for office, which was higher than the 30% who would likely oppose a gay or lesbian candidate.

Science

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Battery, JCESR, Electrochemistry, redox-flow batteries, Renewable Energy

Stabilizing Energy Storage

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University of Utah and University of Michigan chemists, participating in a U.S. Department of Energy consortium, predict a better future for these types of batteries, called redox flow batteries. Using a predictive model of molecules and their properties, the team has developed a charge-storing molecule around 1,000 times more stable than current compounds.

Medicine

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zika, Pregnancy, Miscarriage, Placenta

Zika May Cause Miscarriages, Thin Brain Tissue in Babies Carried to Term

Johns Hopkins researchers say that in early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta – intended to protect the developing fetus – and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells.

Medicine

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Immunity, Immunology, Antibodies, zika, Virus, Vaccine, Birth Defect, Congenital, Dna Vaccines, Clinical Trials

Research Teams Hone in on Zika Vaccines, but Challenges Remain

As public health officials warn that spring’s warmer temperatures may herald another increase of Zika virus infections in the Caribbean and North and South America, researchers around the world are racing to develop safe and effective measures to prevent the disease. In a review paper published today in the journal Immunity, a group of leading vaccine scientists – including Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) – outline advances in the hunt for a Zika vaccine and the challenges that still lie ahead. “The pace of preclinical and early clinical development for Zika vaccines is unprecedented,” said Barouch, corresponding author and director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at BIDMC. “In less than a year, our group and others have demonstrated that multiple vaccine platforms can provide robust protection against Zika virus challenge in animal models. However, unique challenges will need to be addressed in the clinical development of a Zi

Medicine

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Stroke, Physical Therapy, physical therapist

Study on Walking Ability Shows Path to Treatment for Stroke Survivors

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Stroke is the leading cause of disability in older adults in the United States, but research by Clarkson University Physical Therapy Professor George Fulk and his colleagues is pointing the way to recovery for people who are relearning how to walk.







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