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Science

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soil, soil health, soil test

What Can I Tell by Looking at—and Touching—My Soil?

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Does my soil have enough organic matter? Does it have a lot of clay? Is it acidic? The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) May 15 Soils Matter blog post explains simple tests you can do to know your soil better.

Science

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UF Study Shows “Pretty” Termites Do the Most Damage

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Termites may be “pretty” in the eyes of a scientist, but don’t let good looks fool you: The prettier termites are more destructive than their uglier counterparts, a University of Florida researcher says.

Science

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Good Natural Dust, Charging with Motion, Plasma Stability, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Science

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Fossils, Argentina, Flowers, Cornell University, History, Cretaceous Period, Paleocene epoch

Oldest Buckthorn Fossilized Flowers Found in Argentina

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Around 66 million years ago, at the end of the Cretaceous period, a giant asteroid crashed into the present-day Gulf of Mexico, leading to the extinction of the non-avian dinosaurs. How plants were affected is less understood, but fossil records show that ferns were the first plants to recover many thousands of years afterward. Now, a team including Cornell researchers reports the discovery of the first fossilized flowers from South America, and perhaps the entire Southern Hemisphere, following the extinction event

Science

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Grizzly Bears, Yellowstone National Park, Yellowstone Ecosystem, Climate Change, Diet, Threatened and endangered species

The Impact of a Changing Climate on Threatened Yellowstone Grizzly Bears

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An analysis of Yellowstone grizzly bear diets reveals that grizzlies in the region continue to feed upon the products of an endangered tree species currently declining at the hands of climate change. Such changes are forcing some bears to look for more varied food sources.

Science

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top 10 new species, species exploration, Biodiversity, International Institute for Species Exploration

ESF to Announce Top 10 New Species This Month

The College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) will announce the Top 10 New Species for 2017 this month. News about the Top 10 New Species will be distributed in an embargoed news release Thursday, May 18. The embargo will lift at 6 a.m. EDT Tuesday, May 23.

Science

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Scripps Institution Of Oceanography, National Science Foundation (NSF) , National Institiutes Of Health, oceans and human health

Study Finds Bacteria Living in Marine Sponge Produce Toxic Flame Retardant-Like Compounds

A Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego-led research team discovered for the first time that a common marine sponge hosts bacteria that specialize in the production of toxic compounds nearly identical to man-made fire retardants.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Sustainable Energy, Climate Change, Trump Administration, Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future

Trump Dump of Paris Climate Deal Bad for Business

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Pollution, Atmospheric Science, China haze

More Natural Dust in the Air Improves Air Quality in Eastern China

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Man-made pollution in eastern China’s cities worsens when less dust blows in from the Gobi Desert, according to a new study. That’s because dust plays an important role in determining the air temperatures and thereby promoting winds to blow away man-made pollution. Less dust means the air stagnates, with man-made pollution sticking around longer.

Science

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Seaweed, Invasive seaweed, marine seascape, underwater seascape, marine food web, meso-inverterbrates, Climate Change, Gulf Of Maine, kelp, Sea kelp beds

UNH Researchers Find Significant Increase of Invasive Seaweed Changing Sea Habitat

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Walking along the beaches of New England, it is easy to spot large amounts of a fine red seaweed clogging the coastline, the result of sweeping changes in the marine environment occurring beneath the water. To further investigate, researchers at the University of New Hampshire looked at seaweed populations over the last 30 years in the Southwestern Gulf of Maine and found the once predominant and towering kelp seaweed beds are declining and more invasive, shrub-like species have taken their place, altering the look of the ocean floor and the base of the marine food chain.







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