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Medicine

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Northwestern University, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern Medicine, Homicide, Psychology

Who Kills a Child?

The neuropsychological profiles of murderers who solely kill children differ significantly from the profiles of those who kill children and adults in the same homicidal act, according to a new study. Murderers of children are impulsive, have lower intelligence and often mental illness. Identifying the differences in the two types of killers adds to the very limited research on the topic and could help predict which children may be at risk.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Counseling, Psychology, Undergraduate, College Students, Education, impostorism, impostor phenomenon, Depression, Anxiety, Perceived Discrimination, African American, Asian American, Latino, Latina, Kevin Cokley, Educational Psychology

Impostor Feelings Fuel Negative Mental Health Outcomes for Minority Students, Study

While perceived discrimination on college campuses compromises the self-esteem, well-being and mental health of ethnic minority students, new psychology research from The University of Texas at Austin suggests the impostor phenomenon may worsen these effects.

Medicine

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Emily Severance, Schizophrenia, Probiotic, yeast

Probiotics Benefit in Schizophrenia Shaped by Yeast Infections

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In a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast infections.

Science

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Studying the Brain's Suspension System in TBIs

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Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, can be devastating and debilitating. Researchers know that the membranes separating the skull from the brain play a key role in absorbing shock and preventing damage caused during a head impact, but the details remain largely mysterious. New research from a team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis takes a closer at this “suspension system” and the insight it could provide to prevent TBI.

Medicine

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Depression, Stress, Serotonin, Genetics

Study Reverses Thinking on Genetic Links to Stress, Depression

For years, scientists have been trying to determine what effect a gene linked to the brain chemical serotonin may have on depression in people exposed to stress. But now, analyzing information from more than 40,000 people who have been studied over more than a decade, researchers led by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found no evidence that the gene alters the impact stress has on depression.

Medicine

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Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, Uniformed Services University, USU, Usuhs, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine, mTBI, TBI, Traumatic Brain Injury, traumatic brain injuries, ENDO 2017, Endocrine Society, Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Disrupted Brain Pathway, Altered Stress Hormones Key to TBI Impact Differences in Men, Women

The brains of men and women are wired differently, and when it comes to traumatic brain injuries (TBI), women are more likely to develop subsequent neuropsychiatric disorders, like anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Until now, it’s been unclear why that is, but a new study by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU) provides that missing link – a potentially disrupted pathway in the brain.

Medicine

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ENDO 2017, Endocrine Society, Neuroendocrine, Traumatic Brain Injury, Mental Health, Anxiety, Depression, Sex Differences, Basic Research, Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences

Traumatic Brain Injuries Leave Women Prone to Mental Health Problems

Traumatic brain injuries affect the body’s stress axis differently in female and male mice, according to research presented at the Endocrine Society’s 99th annual meeting, ENDO 2017, in Orlando, Fla. The results could help explain why women who experience blast injuries face a greater risk of developing mental health problems than men.

Medicine

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Epilepsy, Stress, stress and seizure, epilepsy and stress, Stress Reduction, Seizure

Stress a Common Seizure Trigger in Epilepsy, UC Study Affirms

A recent review article in the European journal Seizure, by researchers at University of Cincinnati Epilepsy Center at the UC Gardner Neuroscience Institute, looks at the stress-seizure relationship and how adopting stress reduction techniques may provide benefit as a low risk form of treatment.

Medicine

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Sleep, Diabetes, ENDO 2017, Endocrine Society, Depression, sleep schedule, chronotypes, Depression and Diabetes, Mental Health, Endocrinology

Late Sleep-Wake Time Preference Linked to Depression in Individuals with Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes who are “night owls” and prefer the evening for activity report having more symptoms of depression than those who are early to bed and early to rise, regardless of the quality of their sleep, a new study finds. Study results are being presented Saturday at the Endocrine Society’s 99th annual meeting in Orlando, Fla.

Medicine

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Experimental Small Molecule Shows Potential in Preventing Meth Relapse

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New research from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) suggests that the reason methamphetamine users find it so hard to quit—88 percent of them relapse, even after rehab—is that meth takes advantage of the brain’s natural learning process.







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