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Science

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Chemistry, Electrochemistry, biochem, Ammonia, Fertilizer, Nitrogen, nitrogenase, Fuel Cell, Redox

Flipping the Switch on Ammonia Production

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University of Utah chemists publish a new method for ammonia production, using enzymes derived from nature, that generates ammonia at room temperature. As a bonus, the reaction generates a small electrical current.

Medicine

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thirdhand smoke, smoke exposure, Enviornmental Health, Public Health

Thirdhand Smoke Affects Weight, Blood Cell Development in Mice

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A new Berkeley Lab-led study found that the sticky residue left behind by tobacco smoke led to changes in weight and blood cell count in mice. These latest findings add to a growing body of evidence that thirdhand smoke exposure may be harmful.

Medicine

Channels:

Neurobiology, Dentate Gyrus, entorhinal cortex, Granule Cells, Synapses, Hippocampus, Neurogenesis, Synaptic Pruning, Apopotosis, BAX

Brain Plasticity: How Adult-Born Neurons Get Wired-in

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Does the brain create additional synapses from the cortical neurons to the new granule cells, or do some cortical neurons transfer connections from mature granule cells to the new granule cells? Researchers have found that the connections are transferred, without adding to the number of synapses.

Science

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Genetics, Genome, UAH, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Encode, National Institutes of Health, National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), gene mapping

UAH, HudsonAlpha Team as Part of National $31.5 Million Genetics Effort

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Research by The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology will help scientists can better understand how our cells work. The research is part of a four-year, $31.5 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project.

Medicine

Science

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Richard Huganir, Paul Worley, Sleep, mice, Brain Cells, homer1a , Memory, homeostatic scaling

Sleep Deprivation Handicaps the Brain's Ability to Form New Memories, Study in Mice Shows

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Studying mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins have fortified evidence that a key purpose of sleep is to recalibrate the brain cells responsible for learning and memory so the animals can "solidify" lessons learned and use them when they awaken -- in the case of nocturnal mice, the next evening.

Medicine

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Stem Cells, bone, Cells, mice, Biotechnology, Biomedical Engineering

UW Scientists Find Key Cues to Regulate Bone-Building Cells

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The prospect of regenerating bone lost to cancer or trauma is a step closer to the clinic as University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists have identified two proteins found in bone marrow as key regulators of the master cells responsible for making new bone.

Medicine

Science

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Group A streptococcus , Infectious Disease, Flesh Eating Bacteria, Pathology, Cytotoxin, Necrotizing Fasciitis

Cytotoxins Contribute to Virulence of Deadly Epidemic Bacterial Infections

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Beginning in the mid-1980s, an epidemic of severe invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), also known as group A streptococcus (GAS), occurred in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. The public became more aware of these sometimes fatal infections, commonly known as the “flesh-eating disease.” A new study in The American Journal of Pathology reports that the bacteria’s full virulence is dependent on the presence of two specific cytotoxins.

Science

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Apoptosis, Cell Adhesion, Drosphilia, Force, Tissue Mechanics

Letting Go

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Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore at the National University of Singapore have described how dying cells detach and are expelled from a tissue, and how tissue tension in the region surrounding a dying cell is remodelled.

Medicine

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DSD, differences of sex development

Sex Development Center Stage in Special Journal Issue

Naveen Uli, MD, associate professor of pediatrics and Michiko Watanabe, PhD, professor of pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine served as editors for the special issue of Birth Defects Research Part C: Embryo Today.

Medicine

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Cancer, Genetics, Drug Development

Potential New Drug Class Hits Multiple Cancer Cell Targets, Boosting Efficacy and Safety

In a new paper published this week in PNAS, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, in collaboration with colleagues at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego, the University of Colorado School of Medicine and SignalRx, a San Diego-based biopharmaceutical company, describe a potential new class of anti-cancer drugs that inhibit two or more molecular targets at once, maximizing therapeutic efficiency and safety.

Medicine

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Kimmel Cancer Center, Kala Visvanathan, Antonio Wolff, Sara Sukumar, arbs, Breast Cancer, Blood Test

Blood Test That Detects Changes in Tumor DNA Predicts Survival of Women with Advanced Breast Cancer

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Results of a multicenter study of 129 women with advanced breast cancer show that a blood test that spots cancer-linked DNA correctly predicted that most of those patients with higher levels of the tumor markers died significantly earlier than those with lower levels.

Medicine

Channels:

atrial fibrillation (AF), Electrophysiology, heart arrhythmias , Cardiovascular Research, Heart Research, Ohio, Ohio State

Scientists Study Live Human Hearts to See What Sustains Irregular Heartbeats

Unique research being done at OSU Wexner Medical Center is changing the way doctors treat one type of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation. Scientists here are the only ones in the world studying revived human atria, donated after a heart transplant, and translating their findings to improve treatment.

Medicine

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Genomics, Biology, Biosciences

Berkeley Lab Breaks Ground on Integrative Genomics Building

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Extending the roots of team science at its birthplace, Berkeley Lab will soon bring together researchers from the DOE Joint Genome Institute with those from the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) under one roof. The groundbreaking for the Integrative Genomics Building celebrates the future colocation of two partnering scientific user community resources and launches construction of the first building in the long-term vision for a consolidated biosciences presence on Berkeley Lab’s main site.

Science

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scholarly publishing, Physiology, American Physiological Society, Atypon, American Journal of Physiology, Journal Of Applied Physiology, Journal of Neurophysiology. , Physiological Genomics

APS Announces Move to Atypon for Journal Hosting

The American Physiological Society will move its physiology research journal titles to Atypon’s Literatum platform, the professional and scholarly publishing industry’s technologically advanced and most widely used online publishing platform for hosting published content.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

locked-in syndrome, Computer Interface, Brain

Brain-Computer Interface Allows Completely Locked-in People to Communicate

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Completely locked-in participants report being “happy”

Medicine

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Thyroid, thyroid research

American Thyroid Association Awards Research Grant

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The ATA has awarded a 2016 ThyCa Research Grant to Trevor Angell, MD, Instructor in the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, for his project entitled "Assessment of Circulation Immune Suppressor Cells for Predicating Treatment Response in Follicular Cell Derived Thyroid Carcinoma." The goal of this prospective study is to determine whether changes in the levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in the peripheral blood of patients with thyroid cancer before and after therapy can serve as a predictive biomarker for response to treatment.

Science

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Cell Adhesion, Photonic And Electronic Devices, crystal sensor, photonic cyrstal-enhanced microcscopy

Researchers Explore Essential Cell Behavior with Crystal Sensor

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A team of University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health has developed a new tool to monitor under a microscope how cells attach to an adjacent substrate. Studying adhesion events can help researchers understand how tissues grow, how diseases spread, and how stem cells differentiate into more specific cell types.

Medicine

Channels:

Endothelium, White Blood Cells, Immune Response, Inflammation, Infection, Alon

White Blood Cells Get Pushy to Reach Infection

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How do white blood cells - the immune cells that race to the sites of infection and inflammation - actually get to their targets? The research of Prof. Ronen Alon has revealed that the white blood cells actually force their way through the blood vessel walls to reach the infection, creating large holes.

Science

Channels:

Bacteriophages, viral proteins, phage biology, x-ray crystallography

Viral Protein Transforms as It Measures Out DNA

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. Jefferson researchers pieced together the three-dimensional atomic structure of a doughnut-shaped protein that acts like a door or ‘portal’ for the DNA to get in and out of the capsid, and have now discovered that this protein begins to transform its structure when it comes into contact with DNA.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

BIRD Foundation, Gene Editing, NovellusDx, Christiana, Israeli biotech, Israeli medical research, Israeli biotech funding, Israeli medical funding, IIA

Personalized Cancer Therapy on the Horizon Thanks to New Genomic Cancer Research Partnership

Gene Editing Institute at Christiana Care Health System partners with NovellusDx in BIRD Foundation Grant







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