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Medicine

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Kimmel Cancer Center, Gregg Semenza, Cancer, Chemotherapy

Scientists Identify Chain Reaction That Shields Breast Cancer Stem Cells From Chemotherapy

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Working with human breast cancer cells and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have identified a biochemical pathway that triggers the regrowth of breast cancer stem cells after chemotherapy.

Medicine

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Hearing Loss, Stem Cell Therapy, Regeneration Of Hair Cells, Deafness

New Technique Generates High Volume of Sensory Cells Needed for Hearing

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In 2013, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers restored partial hearing to mice by regenerating hair cells — tiny, sound-sensing cells in the ear, which are lost through noise damage, age, etc., and do not regenerate on their own — by converting stem cells found in the ear into hair cells. However, the success of restoring hearing through this approach was limited by the small number of cells that could be turned into hair cells. In a new study in Cell Reports, a research team from Mass. Eye and Ear, Brigham and Women's Hospital and MIT has shown that they can augment the number of those cells, and then convert that large population into hair cells, lending hope that full hearing can be restored to those with hearing loss due to damaged hair cells.

Medicine

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Stem Cells

Blast Off: Stem Cells From Mayo Clinic Physician’s Lab Launch Into Space

Today, the latest rocket launch from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, included a payload of several samples of donated adult stem cells from a research laboratory at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus.

Medicine

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Umbilical Cord, Umbilical Cord Blood, Stem Cell, Cord Blood Banking, New York

Upstate Opens Cord Blood Bank, Only the Second Public Cord Blood Bank in New York and One of Only 32 in the US

Upstate Medical University has opened a $15 million, 20,000 square foot cord blood bank that features a state of the art processing laboratory and cryogenic storage containers that can store nearly 14,500 units of cord blood. The bank will collect, test, process, store and distribute umbilical cord blood donated by families throughout central and northern New York to be used by those in need of life-saving medical treatments and for medical research.

Medicine

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Stem Cells Collected From Fat May Have Use in Anti-Aging Treatments

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Adult stem cells collected directly from human fat are more stable than other cells – such as fibroblasts from the skin – and have the potential for use in anti-aging treatments, according to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. They made the discovery after developing a new model to study chronological aging of these cells.

Medicine

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Cancer, Leukemia, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, FLT3, RUNX1

Tumor Suppressor Promotes Some Acute Myeloid Leukemias, Study Reveals

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Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, “RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,” which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

Science

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Tissue Engineering, Nervous System, Intestinal, Diabetes

Researchers Engineer Intestinal Tissue with Functioning Nervous System

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For the first time, NIH-funded researchers have used stem cells to grow intestinal tissues with a functioning nervous system. The advance creates new opportunities for studying intestinal diseases, nutritional health, and diabetes. It also brings researchers one step closer to growing patient-specific human intestines for transplant.

Medicine

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Stem Cell, Leukemia, MDs, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, CRISPR, Mount Sinai Health System

Scientists Create Novel Model That Shows Progression From Normal Blood Cells to Leukemia

Mount Sinai researchers have created a novel model that shows the step-by-step progression from normal blood cells to leukemia and its precursor diseases, creating replicas of the stages of the disease to test the efficacy of therapeutic interventions at each stage, according to a study to be published in Cell Stem Cell. This research marked the first time scientists have been able to transplant leukemia from humans to a test tube and then into mice for study, a landmark feat that will allow for valuable research to help find therapies for blood cancer patients in the future.

Medicine

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Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Congenital Heart Defect, Dr. Timothy Nelson, Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, Medical Research, Minnesota News Releases, news releases, Regenerative Medicine, Stem Cells

Mayo Clinic, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Announce Rare Congenital Heart Defect Collaboration

Mayo Clinic’s Todd and Karen Wanek Family Program for Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia are collaborating to delay and prevent heart failure for hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a rare and complex form of congenital heart disease in which the left side of a child's heart is severely underdeveloped.

Medicine

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Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Genetics, Genetic Profiling, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Blood Cancers, Cancer Alternative Medicine Biology Breast Cancer Nutrition/Nutrients Public Health, MDs

Genetic Profiling Can Guide Stem Cell Transplantation for Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Study Finds

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A single blood test and basic information about a patient’s medical status can indicate which patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are likely to benefit from a stem cell transplant, according to new research by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.







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