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Science

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Nuclear Physics, Physics, Nuclear Science, tellurium, Physical Review Letters , Magic, magic nuclei, Nuclei, atomic nucleus, Nucleus, Radioactive, Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ORNL, Neutrons, Atoms, atom, electronic properties, magnetic properties, Protons, neutron motion, Electromagnetic, Electromagnetic Field, Electro

Neutrons Play the Lead to Protons in Dance Around “Double-Magic” Nucleus

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Electric and magnetic properties of a radioactive atom provide unique insight into the nature of proton and neutron motion.

Medicine

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Skin Cancer, Melanoma, Indoor Tanning, public health messages

Images of Health Risks Make Indoor Tanning Messages More Effective

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UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report in a new study that anti-tanning bed messages with images showing longer-term health effects, such as skin cancer or wrinkles, produced greater negative emotional reactions and higher ratings of effectiveness in a survey of female college students than text-only messages.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Testosteron, Endocrinology, Cortisol, Aggressive, Submissive, Social Hierarchy, Robert A. Josephs, The University Of Texas At Austin, University Of Oregon

Hormone-Influenced Social Strategies Shape Human Social Hierarchy, Study Shows

In a game of chicken, the most aggressive players are fueled by testosterone and are more willing to harm others; and while it may be easy to demonize such hawkish behaviors, psychology researchers from The University of Texas at Austin say there is sound evolutionary reason for their existence.

Medicine

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Brandyn Lau, Sexual Orientation, gay, Lesbian, LGBTQ

Physicians Vastly Underestimate Patients' Willingness to Share Sexual Orientation, Study Finds

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A study that surveyed a national sample of emergency department health care providers and adult patients suggests that patients are substantially more willing to disclose their sexual orientation than health care workers believe.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Social Networks, Friendship, Death, Grieving, Recovery, Resilience

After the Death of a Friend, Healing in a Human Social Network

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The first large-scale research on recovery and resilience after a death in a friend group – a study of 15,000 anonymized networks on Facebook - shows that when a friend dies, we get closer to that person’s friends. A human social network repairs itself in ways that keep our total connectedness the same.

Business

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Corporate Governance, Competition, Self-Interest

Competition Limits Self-Interests That Pose Potential Problems for Corporations

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New research by an Iowa State University professor of management examines how competing interests within an organization can limit unethical behavior. David King says there needs to be a restructuring of corporate governance so more people are at the table making decisions.

Medicine

Business

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Cancer, Income, Workforce, famliy

A Cancer in the Family: One Spouse’s Diagnosis Can Lower Household Income

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Caring for a husband or wife with cancer significantly diminishes family income, according to researchers from the University of Georgia, who tracked changes in employment and income among working-age couples in Canada.

Medicine

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Pregnancy, Low Birth Weight, Poverty

Link Found Between Financial Strain and Low-Birth-Weight Babies

A financially strapped pregnant woman’s worries about the arrival and care of her little one could contribute to birth of a smaller, medically vulnerable infant, a new study suggests.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Study Puts Global Post-World War II Economic Policies in New Light

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While economists focused on "The Great Moderation" from 1980s to 2007, a new study led by a University of Kansas economist that examined data in eight countries going back to the 1800s found that reductions in volatility were actually greater in two other periods — post World War II and the 1920s.

Medicine

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Genetics, Postmenopausal Hormone Therapy, Postmenopausal Women, personalized medicine, Fracture, Fracture Risk

Genetics Are Key to Hormone Therapy Lowering Risk of Broken Bones in Older Women

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Women at the highest genetic risk for fracture benefit the most from hormone therapy, according to a first-of-its-kind study led by researchers at the University at Buffalo.







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