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Science

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San Andreas Fault, Earthquake, geometric modeling

Re-Thinking Southern California Earthquake Scenarios

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New 3D numerical modeling that captures far more geometric complexity of an active fault segment in southern California than any other, suggests that the overall earthquake hazard for towns on the west side of the Coachella Valley such as Palm Springs may be slightly lower than previously believed.

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International Scientific Society Reacts to L'aquila Seismologists Acquittal

The following statement is attributable to Christine McEntee, Executive Director and CEO, American Geophysical Union:

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Silent Evidence of the Earthquake of 363 CE

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During their last excavation season archeologists from the Institute of Archaeology at the University of Haifa found fascinating findings: In addition to a gold pendant, they found a large muscular marble leg and artillery ammunition from some 2,000 years ago. “The data is finally beginning to form a clear historical-archaeological picture,” said Dr. Michael Eisenberg, the dig director

Science

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Tsunami, Japan, Landslide, Earthquake

URI Ocean Engineer: Underwater Landslide Doubled Size of 2011 Japanese Tsunami

An ocean engineer at the University of Rhode Island has found that a massive underwater landslide, not just the 9.0 earthquake, was responsible for triggering the deadly tsunami that struck Japan in March 2011.

Science

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Earth Science, Geology, Plate Tectonics, Earthquake

Drilling Into an Active Earthquake Fault in New Zealand

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Three University of Michigan geologists are participating in an international effort to drill nearly a mile beneath the surface of New Zealand this fall to bring back rock samples from an active fault known to generate major earthquakes.

Science

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Earthquake, Earthquake Building, Civil Engineering, Structural Engineering, Computers, Information Technologies, Electronic

Video: Can a Stack of Computer Servers Survive an Earthquake?

In high-seismic regions, new facilities often are engineered with passive protective systems that provide overall seismic protection. But often, existing facilities are conventional fixed-base buildings in which seismic demands on sensitive equipment located within are significantly amplified. In such buildings, sensitive equipment needs to be secured from these damaging earthquake effects.

Science

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Earthquakes, Icequakes, Antarctica, Georgia Institute Of Technology

2010 Chilean Earthquake Causes Icequakes in Antarctica

Seismic events aren’t rare occurrences on Antarctica, where sections of the frozen desert can experience hundreds of micro-earthquakes an hour due to ice deformation. Some scientists call them icequakes. But in March of 2010, the ice sheets in Antarctica vibrated a bit more than usual because of something more than 3,000 miles away: the 8.8-magnitude Chilean earthquake. A new Georgia Institute of Technology study published in Nature Geoscience is the first to indicate that Antarctica’s frozen ground is sensitive to seismic waves from distant earthquakes.

Medicine

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Haiti, UF, Health, EPI

Relief Organizations Need to Think Long-Term

When a magnitude-7.0 earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, the world wanted to help.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Chile, Chile Earthquake, Earthquake, South America

Earthquake in Chile: Experts Available to Comment

Science

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Earthquake, Chile, chilean earthquake

Massive Chile Quake May Still Not Be the ‘Big One’

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Landslide, Landslides, rock avalanches, Bingham Canyon Mine, Rio Tinto, Kennecott Utah Copper, Earthquakes, Quakes, Copper

Mine Landslide Triggered Quakes

Last year’s gigantic landslide at a Utah copper mine probably was the biggest nonvolcanic slide in North America’s modern history, and included two rock avalanches that happened 90 minutes apart and surprisingly triggered 16 small earthquakes, University of Utah scientists discovered.

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Scientists Anticipated Size and Location of 2012 Costa Rica Earthquake

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Scientists using GPS to study changes in the Earth’s shape accurately forecasted the size and location of the magnitude 7.6 Nicoya earthquake that occurred in 2012 in Costa Rica.

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Fred Chester, Texas A&M University, Japan earthquake

Thin Soil Layers Contributed To Devastating 2011 Japan

An extremely thin layer of clay sediment below the ocean floor is a primary cause of the huge tsunami associated with the 2011 Japan earthquake, according to research by an international team of scientists that include a Texas A&M University professor.

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Earthquake, Japan

SU Earthquake Expert Available to Discuss M7.3 in Japan

Science

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Nonproliferation, Sandia National Laboratories, Software, Seismic, Computer Model

3D Earth Model Developed at Sandia Labs More Accurately Pinpoints Source of Earthquakes, Explosions

Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory have partnered to develop a 3-D model of the Earth’s mantle and crust called SALSA3D, or Sandia-Los Alamos 3D. The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) in Vienna, Austria, more accurately locate all types of explosions.

Science

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earthquake engineering, Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, earthquake test

Man-Made Quakes Could Lead to Safer, Sturdier Buildings

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Earthquakes never occur when you need one, so a team led by Johns Hopkins structural engineers is shaking up a building themselves in the name of science and safety. Using massive moving platforms and an array of sensors and cameras, the researchers are trying to find out how well a two-story building made of cold-formed steel can stand up to a lab-generated Southern California quake.

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IRAN, Earthquake, Geophysics Research

Unusual Geophysics May Have Spared Iran Far Greater Damage

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Team Speeds Seismic Simulation Code Using GPUs

A team of researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and the Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering at the University of California, San Diego, has developed a highly scalable computer code that promises to dramatically cut both research times and energy costs in simulating seismic hazards throughout California and elsewhere.

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Scripps Scientists Discover ‘Lubricant’ for Earth’s Tectonic Plates

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have found a layer of liquefied molten rock in Earth’s mantle that may be acting as a lubricant for the sliding motions of the planet’s massive tectonic plates. The discovery may carry far-reaching implications, from solving basic geological functions of the planet to a better understanding of volcanism and earthquakes.

Science

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earthquake engineering, New York City, University At Buffalo

Quake Test: Can NYC’s Row Houses Handle an Earthquake?

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Researchers will conduct a rare – if not unprecedented – large-scale earthquake simulation to determine how vulnerable New York’s unreinforced masonry buildings (row houses) are to temblors.







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