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Medicine

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Autism, ASD, Care Givers, Caregiver Burden, Caregiving, Parenting, Stress and Anxiety

For Parents of Autistic Children, More Social Support Means Better Health

About one in 68 children in the United States has an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Their parents consistently report greater stress levels, caregiving burden and depression than parents of typically developing children. Chronic caregiving stress has also been associated with poorer physical health — more pain, more disruptions from physical-health problems and lower overall health-related quality of life. One powerful way to reduce their stress: social support.

Medicine

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Longer Maternity Leave Linked to Better Infant Health

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For each additional month of paid maternity leave offered in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), infant mortality is reduced by 13%, according to a new study by researchers from McGill University and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Conspicuous Consumption May Drive Fertility Down

A new mathematical model shows how fertility goes down as the cost of achieving social status goes up.

Business

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TAX, Audit, IRS, tax extension, whitman school of management, Whitman School , syracuse university

You Still May Have to Pay the IRS, and 4 Other Things to Know When Filing a Tax Extension

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Medicine

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Sperm, Contraception

Preventing Sperm’s ‘Power Kick’ Could Be Key to Unisex Contraceptive

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UC Berkeley biologists have discovered the switch that triggers the power kick sperm use to penetrate and fertilize a human egg, uncovering a possible source of male infertility but also a potential target for contraceptives that work in both men and women.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Premature Babies, Parents, Psychology

Parents Think Life Quality Is Worse for Teens and Adults Born Very Premature

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Parents of very premature babies are more worried about their grown up children’s lives than mothers and fathers whose babies were born full term.

Medicine

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preterm babies, Preterm, Birth, birth and delivery, Preemie, Preemie Baby, Babies, babies development, Supplements, DHA, Research & Development, NIH Award, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

DHA Supplement Being Studied to Reduce Preterm Births

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A new, multicenter National Institutes of Health study to determine whether an over the counter fatty acid supplement, called DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 fatty acid), can assist with reducing early preterm births.

Medicine

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Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Postpartum Depression, Oxytocin, Suena Massey

Oxytocin Level in Pregnancy Predicts Postpartum Depression Severity

Higher oxytocin levels in the third trimester of pregnancy predicts the severity of postpartum depression symptoms in women who previously suffered from depression, reports a new study. The finding indicates the potential for finding biomarkers to predict depressive symptoms postpartum and begin preventive treatment. Depression biomarkers should be screened in pregnancy, just like gestational diabetes, scientists said.

Medicine

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University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences, UAMS, tracheal intubation, JAMA Pediatrics, Ronald Sanders, Jr., M.D., Dr. Ronald Sanders, NEAR4KIDS , National Emergency Airway Registry for Children, family presence, patient- and family-centered care, PICU

UAMS Researcher Advances Family Involvement With Critically Ill Child

Family presence when a child is undergoing tracheal intubation in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) can safely be implemented as part of a family-centered care model, reported a research team led by a University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) professor in the March 7 issue of JAMA Pediatrics.

Medicine

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Residency, Medical Training, Parenting

Dr. Mom and Dr. Dad: Juggling Roles During Residency Training

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More and more physicians are becoming parents during their medical residency training. While most residency programs offer support for resident physicians during pregnancy, no formal ways to support parenting residents exist beyond the immediate birth of their children. Following a recent study of conflicts with work and family life, a University of Missouri School of Medicine researcher suggests that supportive residency training programs are needed to assist physicians who are managing demanding work and personal lives.







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