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Medicine

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Influenza, Flu Vaccine

TSRI Scientists Show How Drug Binds with ‘Hidden Pocket’ on Flu Virus

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A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) is the first to show exactly how the drug Arbidol stops influenza infections. The research reveals that Arbidol stops the virus from entering host cells by binding within a recessed pocket on the virus.

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Penn Reseachers Given $12 Million from NIH Establish Pancreas Research Program

A $12 Million, four-year grant will establish the Human Pancreas Analysis Program. HPAP is focused on procuring and phenotyping pancreatic tissues from individuals with or at risk for Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, or other types of pancreatic islet dysfunction characterized by changes in beta cell mass.

Medicine

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Medicine And Health, Biology, Genetics

Study Shows Discrimination Interacts with Genetics and Impacts Health

It’s no secret that discrimination is stressful for those who experience it, but turns out the issue is more than skin deep—these stressors can interact with our genetics to negatively impact our health, a new University of Florida study shows.

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Scripps Florida Scientists Uncover Cellular Process Behind Premature Aging

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In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have shown how two genes “balance” each other to maintain normal cell function. A disruption in one of the genes, called spns1, can induce degradation and premature “senescence”—or aging—while the other gene, called atp6v0ca, can jump in to suppress that degradation.

Medicine

Science

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Cell Signaling, G-Proteins, Pharmacology, Biochemistry & Biophysics, Cancer

Inside the World of Cell Signaling: A G-Protein Breakthrough

Scientists have few good methods for manipulating and investigating G-protein signaling. Now, UNC scientists have developed small proteins to selectively block a certain type of G-protein signaling, creating a unique and powerful tool for studying cell processes that depend on this signaling.

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spider silk, Engineering, North Dakota State University, Medical Treatments, Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Animal Science, Medical Laboratory Science

Research Experience Gives NDSU Student Confidence, Career Options

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A team of North Dakota State University students and faculty are researching ways to use spider silk for medical treatments.

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Jonathan Schneck, Jordan Green, arbs, antigen-presenting cells, APCs, anti-PD1 , PD-1, cell, Protein, Cancer, mice , Immune

Dual Strategy Teaches Mouse Immune Cells to Overcome Cancer’s Evasive Techniques

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By combining two treatment strategies, both aimed at boosting the immune system’s killer T cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report they lengthened the lives of mice with skin cancer more than by using either strategy on its own. And, they say, because the combination technique is easily tailored to different types of cancer, their findings — if confirmed in humans — have the potential to enhance treatment options for a wide variety of cancer patients.

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Manuela Baccarini, University of Vienna, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL), Medical University of Vienna, Liver Cancer, RAF1, Protein, Oncogene, tumour suppressor, Nature Communications, Hepatocellular Carcinoma, liver carcinogenesis

One More Piece in the Puzzle of Liver Cancer Identified

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Manuela Baccarini and her team at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories (MFPL) of the University of Vienna and Medical University of Vienna are one step closer to unravelling the mechanisms behind liver cancer. The researchers discovered that RAF1, a protein known as an oncogene in other systems, unexpectedly acts as a tumour suppressor in hepatocellular carcinoma. The study is published in the renowned journal Nature Communications.

Medicine

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Immunology, T Cells, CD8+ T cells, Infectious Diseases, Tumor Biology, cancer immunotherapy, Bioinformatics, Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia

Dynamic Changes, Regulatory Rewiring Occur as T Cells Respond to Infection

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Scientists have used systems biology tools to map out molecular pathways and signaling circuits that come into play when the immune system acts against infections and cancer. Important immune cells, called CD8+ T cells, play a pivotal role in immune response, but their gene regulatory circuits have not been well understood.

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stem cell clinical trials , Pediatric Heart Surgery, Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome

First U.S. Babies Treated in Unique Study of Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Congenital Heart Disease

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) and the Interdisciplinary Stem Cell Institute (ISCI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have begun testing to see whether adult stem cells derived from bone marrow benefit children with the congenital heart defect hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS).

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Stroke, White Matter

Brain Generates Replacement Cells After Stroke

UCLA researchers initiate brain repair following white matter stroke in animals, identifying a possible therapeutic target to combat this common cause of dementia

Medicine

Science

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Circadian Clock, Circadian Clocks, Jennifer Hurley, NIH, NIH Award, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, , omics, Multiscale Modeling, Metabolism, Inflammation, Inflammation and disease

Tracking the Circadian Clock

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Biology dictates that DNA creates proteins which create – among other things – metabolites, the outputs of metabolism. In organisms from fungi to humans, the relationship between these players is heavily influenced by our internal circadian clock, and responds to environmental influences (such as a prolonged day) with implications from industry to human health.

Medicine

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Ravit Boger, Cytomegalovirus, CMV, NOD1, protein , Infection, risk

Genetic Mutations Could Increase Risk of Cytomegalovirus Infection

Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV is a common pathogen that infects almost 60 percent of adults in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and can lead to devastating developmental defects in fetuses and severe disease in people with weakened immune systems.

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Sunlight, Sunlight Exposure, T Cells, Infection, Vitamin D, Hydrogen Peroxide

Sunlight Offers Surprise Benefit — It Energizes Infection Fighting T Cells

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Researchers have found that sunlight, through a mechanism separate than vitamin D production, energizes T cells that play a central role in human immunity. The findings suggest how the skin, the body’s largest organ, stays alert to the many microbes that can nest there.

Science

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Tissue Regeneration, Muscles, Nanomaterials, Material Science, Stem Cell, Tissue Repair, Biomaterials

UW Researcher Pursues Synthetic 'Scaffolds' for Muscle Regeneration

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Miqin Zhang, a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Washington, is looking for ways to help the body heal itself when injury, disease or surgery cause large-scale damage to one type of tissue in particular: skeletal muscle.

Medicine

Science

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Cell Biology, Electron Microscopy, Holiday, endosome

Cool Image: Adding Color to the Gray World of Electron Microscopy

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While it may look like a pine wreath dotted with crimson berries, this holiday-themed image is in fact one of the world’s first color electron micrographs.

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Moffitt Researchers Develop First Genomics-Driven Model for Personalized Radiation Therapy

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have their study published today in The Lancet Oncology describing a novel genomics model that allows a personalized approach to radiation therapy.

Medicine

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La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Immunity, Immunology, T Cells, Viruses

Exhausted T cells

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In a bid to better understand the gene expression patterns that control T cell activity, researchers at the La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology mapped genome-wide changes in chromatin accessibility as T cells respond to acute and chronic virus infections.

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Penn Center for Precision Medicine Awards $525,000 in First Accelerator Grants

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The Penn Center for Precision Medicine (PCPM) Accelerator Fund awarded eight research teams from Penn Medicine in their inaugural support of the implementation of personalized medicine projects across a gamut of clinical specialties. The projects cover a range of clinical applications, from lung cancer to infectious disease to knee surgery.

Medicine

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DNA, Tularemia, Disease, Genome, Sequence

DNA Markers Distinguish Between Harmless, Deadly Bacteria

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Through a new study of the coccobacillus Francisella, Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers are working to use DNA markers to discern related but relatively harmless species as they are identified and to provide a means to distinguish them from the harmful F. tularensis.







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