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Medicine

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Bone Marrow Transplantation, B cell immune reconstitution, impairment of antibody immune reconstitution

New Finding Affecting Immune Reconstitution Related to B Cells

Researchers examined the mechanisms of B cell immune reconstitution in pediatric patients who had undergone bone marrow transplantation and discovered a disruption in the maturation of B cells – critical to the immune system – preventing the production of antibodies that fight infection.

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Breakthrough Study Stops Fat-Eating Prostate Cancer Cells

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Patients with castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) usually have a poor prognosis. In part, this is due to the cancer’s ability to resist anti-androgen therapy. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today [May 3] in Oncotarget shows that combining a CPT1A inhibitors with anti-androgen therapy increases the cancer’s sensitivity to the anti-androgen drug enzalutamide.

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Stem Cell Trial for Stroke Patients Suffering Chronic Motor Deficits Begins at UTHealth

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A clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a stem cell product injected directly into the brain to treat chronic motor deficits from ischemic stroke has begun at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Medicine

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Pediatrics, Pediatric Oncology, cancer immunotherapy, All, CAR T cells, Center for Childhood Cancer Research, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Children's Hospital Of Philadelphia, Cell Therapy

Dr. Stephan Grupp to Lead Cellular Therapy & Transplant Section in CHOP Cancer Program

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A leading pediatric oncologist at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), Stephan Grupp, MD, PhD, will become Chief of the Section of Cellular Therapy and Transplant in the Hospital’s Division of Oncology. Grupp, who has researched and led groundbreaking clinical trials of an innovative T cell therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), will assume this position on June 1.

Medicine

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Lymphoma, DHL, Stem Cell Transplant, Stem Cell Transplantation, Chemotherapy

Stem-Cell Transplants Show Limited Benefit for Double-Hit Lymphoma Patients in Remission

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Patients with double hit lymphoma (DHL) who undergo autologous stem-cell transplantation (autoSCT) after achieving remission are not more likely to remain in remission or live longer than patients who do not undergo autoSCT, according to a new analysis from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania.

Medicine

Science

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Thirsty Seeds, Strawberry Mythbusters, Sugar or Protein, and More in the Food Science News Source

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

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New Lung “Organoids” in a Dish Mimic Features of Full-Size Lung

New lung “organoids”—tiny 3-D structures that mimic features of a full-sized lung—have been created from human pluripotent stem cells by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC). The team used the organoids to generate models of human lung diseases in a lab dish, which could be used to advance our understanding of a variety of respiratory diseases.

Medicine

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discovery research, Dna Damage, Dna Repair, protein imaging, Ubiquitin, Georges Mer

Knowledge of DNA Repair Mechanisms Advances with New Paper From Mayo Clinic Scientists

We humans like to think our DNA is well-protected in the nucleus of each cell. But it’s a hard life for the hard-working genetic code.

Science

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selfish gene, Pathogen, Disease

Study of Worms Reveals ‘Selfish Genes’ That Encode a Toxin – and Its Antidote

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UCLA scientists team found that a worm commonly used in lab research possesses a pair of genes that encode both a poison and its antidote. The genes represent one of the clearest examples to date of a “selfish genetic element” at the molecular level.

Medicine

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San Diego, Palm Beach Florida, Gene Therapies, Adenovirus

Why One Eye-Targeting Virus Could Make for a Useful Gene-Delivery Tool

In their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. That’s why scientists have been working to use viruses as forces for good: to deliver useful genes to human cells and help patients who lack important proteins or enzymes. A team of researchers led by Associate Professor Vijay Reddy at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has now uncovered the structural details that make one virus a better tool for future therapies than its closely related “cousin.”







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