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Medicine

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'Mini-Guts' Offer Clues to Pediatric GI Illness

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Using immature stem cells to create a miniature model of the gut in the laboratory, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pittsburgh have determined how infection-causing enteroviruses enter the intestine.

Medicine

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Cancer Cells, cancer metastasis, Yale Cancer Center, Melanoma, White Blood Cells

Clue to How Cancer Cells Spread

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In a second human case, a Yale-led research team has found that a melanoma cell and a white blood cell can fuse to form a hybrid with the ability to metastasize. The finding provides further insight into how melanoma and other cancers spread from solid tumors with implications for future treatment.

Science

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Researchers Watch in 3D as Neurons Talk to Each Other in a Living Mouse Brain

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No single neuron produces a thought or a behavior; anything the brain accomplishes is a vast collaborative effort between cells. When at work, neurons talk rapidly to one another, forming networks as they communicate. Scientists at the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna and the Rockefeller University in New York are developing technology that would make it possible to record brain activity as it plays out across these networks.

Medicine

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NIH Funds UND Study of Early Formation of Cancer-Causing Viruses

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Barry Milavetz researches epigenetic modifications in infected cells when they’re most easily treatable

Medicine

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Cystic Fibrosis, stem cell clinical trials , Mesenchymal Stem Cells

University Hospitals Rainbow Babies & Children’s Hospital Opens First Stem Cell Study in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

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News release about the first person enrolled in the first stem cell trial for cystic fibrosis.

Medicine

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TSRI Scientists Find Brain Hormone That Triggers Fat Burning

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Biologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a brain hormone that appears to trigger fat burning in the gut. Their findings in animal models could have implications for future pharmaceutical development.

Medicine

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Gene-delivery Therapy, Hearing, DEAF, Genetic form of deafness, Inner ear hair cells, Missing gene in hearing, Gene Therapy, Hair Cells, Hard Of Hearing, partial hearing loss, Hearing Loss, Restoring Hearing, Hearing Impairment, Exosomes, exo-AAV, Restoring hearing in mice

A Better Carrier

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• Harvard Medical School scientists and colleagues from the Massachusetts General Hospital have partly restored hearing in mice with a genetic form of deafness. • Scientists altered a common virus, enhancing its ability to enter hair cells in the inner ear that are critical for hearing and to deliver a missing gene essential for hearing and balance. • The new approach overcomes a longstanding barrier to gene therapy for inherited and acquired deafness.

Medicine

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HIV, HIV-1, AIDS, GALT, IgM, IgG, IGA, Protein microarray analysis, Inflammation, Antibody

How the Border Guards Fail in HIV Infection

Using a novel technique to analyze antibodies in fluid collected from intestines of 81 HIV-1-infected and 25 control individuals, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have found abnormal gut antibody levels in people infected with HIV-1.

Medicine

Science

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LSD, Pharmacology, Serotonin receptors, Acid, Psychedelic Drug Effects

This Is LSD Attached to a Brain Cell Serotonin Receptor

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UNC School of Medicine researchers crystalized the structure of LSD attached to a human serotonin receptor of a brain cell, and they may have discovered why an “acid trip” lasts so long.

Medicine

Science

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Andrew Holland, Chromosomes, Centrosomes, Plk4, Tumor

Trying to Tango with More Than 2: Extra Centrosomes Promote Tumor Formation in Mice

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When a cell is dividing, two identical structures, called centrosomes, move to opposite sides of the cell to help separate its chromosomes into the new cells.

Medicine

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Cancer Research, Breast Cancer, Head And Neck Cancer, Otolaryngology, Cancer, cancer cell biology, dormant cancer cells, Dormancy, Hypoxia, Chemotherapy, Cancer Drug, cancer drug resistance, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Mount Sinai Health System, Tumor, cancer tumor, Disease

Mount Sinai Researchers Discover How Primary Tumors Can Program Cancer Cells That Spread to Become Dormant and Resist Cancer Treatment

Findings could transform cancer drug development and patient care

Medicine

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laboratory technology, cell reprogramming, Precision Medicine, Cancer Drug, Cells

Scientists Describe Lab Technique with Potential to Change Medicine and Research

Researchers who developed and tested a revolutionary laboratory technique that allows for the endless growth of normal and diseased cells in a laboratory are publicly sharing how the technique works.

Medicine

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pulmospheres, Pulmonary, IPF, Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, Precision Medicine

Precision Medicine: UAB Study Creates ‘Mini-Lung’ to Study Effect of Pulmonary Fibrosis Drugs

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Pulmospheres, three dimensional multicellular spheroids composed of lung cells from individual patients, were shown to be effective in predicting the efficacy of medications for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, according to findings from UAB presented today in JCI Insight.

Medicine

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Chulan Kwon, heart muscle, Stem Cells, Rat, rrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, Arvc

Mature Heart Muscle Cells Created in the Laboratory From Stem Cells

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Generating mature and viable heart muscle cells from human or other animal stem cells has proven difficult for biologists.

Medicine

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Biomedical Engineering, Myocardial Infarction, Heart Attack, Cell Therapy, Stem Cell, human induced pluripotent stem cells

Tissue Engineering Advance Reduces Heart Failure in Model of Heart Attack

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Cardiac muscle patches in this proof-of-concept research may represent an important step toward the clinical use of 3-D-printing technology, as researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer.

Medicine

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DiGeorge Syndrome Kidney Problems May Be Caused By Missing Gene

A research team led by Columbia University has discovered that loss of function of the CRKL gene causes kidney and urinary tract defects in people with DiGeorge syndrome, solving a 60-year-old medical mystery.

Science

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Cytoskeleton, Cell Biology, Cell Biology and Physiology

The Strings That Bind Us: Cytofilaments Connect Cell Nucleus to Extracellular Microenvironment

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New images by Berkeley Lab scientists are providing the first visual evidence of a long-postulated physical link by which genes can receive mechanical cues from its microenvironment. Created by integrating six different imaging techniques, the images show thread-like cytofilaments reaching into and traversing a human breast cell's chromatin-packed nucleus.

Science

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On Target: UNC Researcher Arms Platelets to Deliver Cancer Immunotherapy

After surgery to remove a cancerous tumor – even if the surgery is considered “successful” – it’s nearly impossible to ensure that all microtumors have been removed from the surgical site. Cancer recurrence is always a major concern. Meanwhile, tiny blood cells called platelets rush in to start the post-surgical healing process. What if those platelets could carry anti-cancer drugs to wipe out those microtumors? UNC and NC State scientists have developed a way to do just that, and they have shown success in animal studies, published today in Nature Biomedical Engineering.

Medicine

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Social Environment, Health, mice

Social Environment Has a Sizable Impact on Health and Disease in Mice

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In humans, social factors may explain ‘missing heritability’ in complex diseases.

Medicine

Science

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Biology, Neurological Diseases, Parkinson's Disease, Whitehead Institute, MIT

New Clues on the Base of Parkinson’s Disease and Other “Synucleinopathies”

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Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other “synucleinopathies” are known to be linked to the misfolding of alpha-synuclein protein in neurons. Less clear is how this misfolding relates to the growing number of genes implicated in PD through analysis of human genetics. Researchers affiliated with Whitehead Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) explain how they used a suite of novel biological and computational methods to shed light on the question.







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