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Medicine

Science

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plant genes & biochemical pathways, natural product discovery, Pharmaceticals, small molecule drugs, Bioproducts

New Method for Tapping Vast Plant Pharmacopeia to Make More Effective Drugs

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Vanderbilt geneticists have developed an effective method for identifying the plant genes that produce the chemical ammunition plants use to protect themselves from predation and is a natural source of many important drugs.

Medicine

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Steroid, Corticosteroids, Back Pain, Bronchitis, Allergies, Sepsis

Common Drugs, Uncommon Risks? Higher Rate of Serious Problems Seen in Adults Who Take Short-Term Steroids

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People taking corticosteroids for short-term relief were more likely to break a bone, have a potentially dangerous blood clot or suffer a life-threatening bout of sepsis in the months after their treatment, compared with similar adults who didn’t use the drugs, a new study finds.

Medicine

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Smoking and cancer, Lung Cancer

Thorough Genotyping and Repurposed Drugs Key to Treating Small-Cell Lung Cancer, says Cancer Expert

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Cancer expert Antonio Giordano, MD, PhD, Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University, describes the recent progress and future possibilities of treating SCLC.

Medicine

Science

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Nanoparticles, Drug Delivery Systems, Brain Injury

A Simple Sniff

A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis has combined nanoparticles, aerosol science and locusts in new proof-of-concept research that could someday vastly improve drug delivery to the brain, making it as simple as a sniff.

Medicine

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Duchenne, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, DMD, Muscular Disorders, Muscular Diseases, Kennedy Kreiger Institute, Center for Genetic Muscular Disorders, Kathyrn Wagner, Dr. Kathryn Wagner, Research, Clinical Trials

Families of Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Band Together to Fund Research

Ryan’s Quest, Michael’s Cause and Pietro’s Fight are non-profits founded by families of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who believe that their global collaboration is paramount to see potential therapies through the drug pipeline.

Medicine

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GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cystic Fibrosis, Thymosin, Thymosin Alpha 1, University of Perugia, University of Rome, Biochemistry, Molecular Medicine, Genetics, Pediatrics, CF, respiratory conditions

Research Uncovers Potential New Treatment to Treat and Stop Progression of Cystic Fibrosis

Researchers published in Nature Medicine from the George Washington University, the University of Perugia, and the University of Rome have discovered a potential new drug to treat and stop the progression of cystic fibrosis. Thymosin α1 is a novel therapeutic single molecule-based therapy that not only corrects genetic and tissue defects, but also significantly reduces inflammation seen in cystic fibrosis patients.

Medicine

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Immunotherapy, Melanoma, Immune Response

Matching Pre-Treatment Tumor Size to Strength of Immune Response Allows Tailoring of Melanoma Drug Regimen

A new study published in Nature provides clues that could enhance physicians’ ability to pinpoint, in real-time, which patients are not responding to therapy – and intervene with additional drugs to boost the chances of shrinking tumors.

Medicine

Channels:

Tuberculosis, Health, Rifampin, Rifampicin, TB, Tb Alliance, Bacteria, Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Drugs, Pharma, Pharmaceucticals, genes, Genetics, Microbiology, Rna Polymerase, Antibiotic Resistance, Mutations, Molecular Cell, Science, Richard H. Ebright, Rutgers, Rutgers University, Amino Acids, Chemistry, Chemical Biology, Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rut

Rutgers Researchers Determine Structure of Tuberculosis Drug Target and Discover New Class of Potential Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs

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Rutgers University scientists have determined the three-dimensional structure of the target of the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug rifampin. They have also discovered a new class of potential anti-tuberculosis drugs that kill rifampin-resistant and multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria. Tuberculosis (TB) bacteria infect a third of the world's population and the disease kills 1.8 million people annually.

Medicine

Business

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Pharmacetical, Veterinary, Veterinary Medicine, HIPRA, Spain, New Jersey, Business, Technology, Technology Parks , Animal Health

International Veterinary Pharmaceutical Firm to Move to Rowan University

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Spanish multinational veterinary pharmaceutical company HIPRA will establish its North American headquarters at the South Jersey Technology Park at Rowan University in Mantua Township, New Jersey.

Medicine

Channels:

x-ray free-electron laser, x-ray crystallography, Structural Biology, Blood Pressure, Sodium, Cell Biology and Physiology

X-Ray Study Reveals Long-Sought Insights Into Potential Drug Target

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Many hypertension medications currently on the market target the AT1 receptor because of its well-understood role in blood pressure regulation; they block AT1 in order to reduce blood pressure. The AT2 receptor, on the other hand, is still an elusive drug target despite multiple studies of its function. Now, researchers have solved its structure to hone in on its function. The results of the experiments were surprising in several ways. First, although both compounds were designed to block and deactivate the receptors, they left AT2 in a state that appeared to be active. In addition, although AT1 and AT2 were thought to be very similar, the pockets where the receptors bind to the compounds exhibited marked differences.







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