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Organized Prescription Drug Collection Programs May Have Minimal Impact on Reducing Availability of Controlled Medications

More than 3.8 billion controlled medications, such as hydrocodone, oxycodone, Valium and Adderall, are dispensed by pharmacies annually in the United States. It has been estimated that only about 30 percent of these drugs are used by the people for whom they were prescribed. The remaining 70 percent represent a large surplus of controlled medications that could be abused or sold to others for abuse.

Medicine

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X-ray Crystallogaphy, Medicine, Solid State, Chemistry, Dosage, Cancer, rare disease, Antiviral Drugs, Global Health, pediatric diseases

AAPS Announces Dale E. Wurster Award in Pharmaceutics

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists is pleased to announce the 2016 Dale E. Wurster recipient, Stephen R. Byrn, Ph.D., of Purdue University. Byrn is recognized for his work in the field of Solid State Chemistry of Drugs. Supported by the Dale E. Wurster Endowment, this award is given to individuals who have made significant contributions to the pharmaceutical sciences in the specific field of pharmaceutics.

Medicine

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Fellow, Global Health, Pharmaceutical Science, Medicine, Dosage, Painkiller, painkiller addiction, Vaccine, Pancreatic Cancer, Assay

AAPS Announces Nine Fellowships, One of the Highest Organizational Honors

The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) is pleased to announce the elevation of nine recipients to Fellow, one of the highest honors given to members of the association. Each year, AAPS elevates a few members to Fellow in recognition of their professional excellence in fields relevant to AAPS’s mission: to advance the capacity of pharmaceutical scientists to develop products and therapies that improve global health.

Medicine

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Biologics, Personalized Medicine, polymyalgia rheumatica, Precision Medicine, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sarcoidosis, Vasculitis

Mayo Clinic Research Sheds Light on Why Some Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Respond Poorly to Biologics

A Mayo Clinic study is shedding light on why some rheumatoid arthritis patients respond poorly when treated with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, part of a class of drugs called biologics.

Medicine

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CDC, Antibiotic, Antibiotic Resistant Infections, Resistant Bacteria, Drug Resistant Bacteria, Infection

Let’s “Get Smart About Antibiotics” Week

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The discovery of antibiotics remains one of the most important medical advances to date, but overuse and inappropriate use of antibiotics has led to many infections becoming resistant to treatment.

Medicine

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Thermo Fisher Scientific Collaborates with Rutgers Engineering Research Center

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Rutgers and Thermo Fisher Scientific have collaborated to foster Rutgers’ research on continuous manufacturing techniques for pharmaceutical discovery. With support from Thermo Fisher, C-SOPS has obtained a twin screw extruder/granulator, which will be used for testing of extrusion and granulation processes in continuous manufacturing.

Medicine

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Celebrex, Celecoxib, Lexapro, Depression, inflammation and depression, Bipolar Disorder

Arthritis Drug Boosts Effectiveness of Antidepressant Medication

Giving severely depressed patients the arthritis drug celecoxib (Celebrex®) dramatically boosted the effectiveness of their antidepressant medication, a Loyola study has found.

Medicine

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Gyanu Lamichhane, Craig Townsend, Antibiotic, Tuberculosis, TB

Johns Hopkins Researcher Advance Treatment of Tuberculosis by Targeting New Enzyme

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have laid the foundation to develop novel antibiotics that work against incurable, antibiotic-resistant bacteria like tuberculosis by targeting an enzyme essential to the production and integrity of bacterial cell walls.

Science

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Ebola, Ebola virus disease, ebola drug

Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc. And Texas Biomed Announce NIH Award to Develop a Treatment for Ebola

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The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) recently awarded $596,533.00 to Collaborations Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (CPI) to initiate a partnership with Texas Biomedical Research Institute aimed at repurposing an antimalarial for use against the Ebola virus.

Medicine

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interleukin 33, IL-33, Itch Gene, Antibodies, Poison Ivy Rash, Poison Ivy Treatment, Atopic Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Dermatologic Conditions, Duke Health, PNAS

Mouse Study Shows Antibody Can Soothe Raging, Nerve-Driven Poison Ivy Itch

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Scientists at Duke Health and Zhejiang Chinese Medical University have developed a strategy to stop the uncontrollable itch caused by urushiol, the oily sap common to poison ivy, poison sumac, poison oak and even mango trees. The team found that by blocking an immune system protein in the skin with an antibody, they could halt the processes that tell the brain the skin is itchy.

Medicine

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Preterm, preterm babies, Preterm Birth, Infant Mortality, Infant Morbidity And Mortality, TLR4, Toll Like Receptor 4, Inflammatory Cascade, Naloxone

Drug Shows Promise for Preventing Pre-Term Birth

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have successfully tested a drug that is showing some early promise in efforts to prevent pre-term birth.

Medicine

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Sirna, Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, nanohydrogel, Targeted Drug Delivery, Cisplatin, Chemo Therapy, Kinase, EGF receptor, EGFR, EGFR inhibitor, Egfr Mutations, EGFR gene, Carcinoma, Tumor, epithelial cancer

Punching Cancer with RNA Knuckles

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Researchers achieved an unexpected eye-popping reduction of ovarian cancer during a successful test of targeted nanohydrogel delivery in vivo in mice. Adding cisplatin eliminated or starkly diminished tumors.

Medicine

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Sarcoma, Cancer, FDA Approval, adult sarcoma

FDA Approves New Drug Combo to Treat Adult Sarcoma

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Medicine

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Penn Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Anesthesiology and Critical Care

Hip Fracture Patients Fare Best During Recovery in High-Occupancy Nursing Homes with Higher Level Physician Staffing

Hip fractures are a common and disabling condition that occurs more than 300,000 times each year in the United States in those 65 and older—1.6 million times worldwide. A new study from Penn Medicine, which compared outcome variations in acute and post-acute care facilities, suggests that for older adults hospitalized with hip fracture, the quality of the post-acute care they receive has a greater impact on long-term recovery than the care they received at the hospital. This study was published today online ahead of print in Medical Care, a journal of the American Public Health Association.

Science

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Chromatin, Protein, Molecular Dynamics, Epigenetic, Drug Discovery, Biology

New Computational Tool May Speed Drug Discovery

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A new computational tool called fABMACS is helping scientists see beyond static images of proteins to more efficiently understand how these molecules function, which could ultimately speed up the drug discovery process.

Medicine

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Medicine, Drugs, Public Health

Gene Mutations May Increase Adverse Event Risk in Older Adults Taking Multiple Meds

Gene mutations that affect drug metabolism may explain higher hospitalization rates for some older adults taking multiple medications, according to researchers from Columbia University.

Medicine

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Immunology, Immune System, University Of Virginia, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Cancer, Cancer Vaccine, Victor H. Engelhard, Craig L. Slingluff Jr., Research, Medical Research, Autoimmune Diseases, Hepatitis, multiple sclerosis, AIDS, Allergies, Diabetes, Autoimmune, Philanthropy, Beirne Carter Center for Immunology Research, UVA School of Medi

UVA's Carter Immunology Center Marks 25 Years of Changing How We Approach Disease

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have developed an experimental vaccine to battle melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. It’s an example of cutting-edge immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system’s power to battle disease. But it also represents a fulfillment of potential UVA recognized 25 years ago. In 1991, with financial support from businessman Beirne B.

Medicine

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Ribosome, catalytic center, chloramphenicol, Linezolid

Two Antibiotics Fight Bacteria Differently Than Thought

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Two widely prescribed antibiotics — chloramphenicol and linezolid — may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. Instead of indiscriminately stopping protein synthesis, the drugs put the brakes on the protein synthesis machinery only at specific locations in the gene.

Medicine

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Cancer, GIST, Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Tumors, Surgery, Drug Targets

Researchers Identify New Drug Target for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

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Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Mayo Clinic provide the first evidence that the Hedgehog signaling pathway is central to the formation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which are frequently driven by the KIT oncogene.

Medicine

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rare disease, Rare Diseases, Orphan Drugs

ISPOR 19th Annual European Congress Examines Value Assessment of Transformative Medicines in Rare Diseases

ISPOR offered an issue panel, "Valuing Transformative Medicines in Rare Diseases: Methods and Madness," at the Society’s 19th Annual European Congress in Vienna, Austria.







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