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Science

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remote underwater exploration, XPRIZE, Ocean Engineering, underwater technology

Ocean Engineering Graduate Is Semifinalist in International Contest for Deep-Water Exploration

XPRIZE officials say Rhyner is among the leaders in underwater exploration.

Science

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battery capacity, sodium battery, rechargeable batteries, Electrochemistry, X-ray microscopy, Irreversibility

Imaging the Inner Workings of a Sodium–Metal Sulfide Battery for First Time

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Scientists discover that the iron sulfide battery material undergoes significant changes in its microstructure and chemical composition as sodium ions enter and leave the material during the first discharge/charge cycle, leading to an initial loss in battery capacity.

Medicine

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Biomedical, biological engineering, Bagley College of Engineering, Mississippi State University, Medical, Undergraduate, Career, Curriculum, Job Market

MSU’s Bagley College of Engineering Launches Biomedical Engineering Degree Program

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The Bagley College of Engineering at Mississippi State University has expanded its undergraduate degree offerings to include a new opportunity in biomedical engineering.

Science

Channels:

Materials Science, Engineering, Biomedical Devices

Boosting the Lifetime and Effectiveness of Biomedical Devices

A research team led by the University of Delaware's David Martin discovered a new approach to boosting the lifetime and effectiveness of electronic biomedical devices. The team hopes the discovery will help the devices better communicate with neural tissue by improving adhesion.

Science

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Ultraviolet, LED light, Gallium Nitride, Cornell

Group Blazes Path to Efficient, Eco-Friendly Deep-Ultraviolet LED

A Cornell-led group has demonstrated the ability to produce deep-ultraviolet emission using an LED light source, potentially solving several problems related to quantum efficiency of current devices.

Science

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Nsf Career Award, Concrete, 3D printing, Infrastructure, Rheology, flow

Professor Shiho Kawashima Wins NSF Career Award

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Professor Shiho Kawashima, assistant professor of civil engineering and engineering mechanics, has won a National Science Foundation CAREER Award to support her work developing concrete systems for use in 3D printing, a technology that could revolutionize the construction and repair of infrastructure.

Science

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Concrete, Sustainability, concrete sustainability, comparative sustainability assessment;, life-cycle assessment, reinforced concrete structure, steel structure

Methodology for Life-Cycle Sustainability Assessment of Building Structures

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The design of new structures, as well as the retrofit strategies of existing buildings, have become the preferential target of contemporary engineers and architects for achieving sustainability goals in the construction industry.

Science

Channels:

voice recognition, Amazon, speech processing, electrical and computer engineering

Voice Technology Education at Johns Hopkins Gets a Boost From Amazon

Amazon has named the Johns Hopkins University among the first four schools to receive support from the Alexa Fund Fellowship, a new program designed to encourage advances in voice communication between people andmachines.

Science

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Education, Middle School, Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day, IGED, Diversity, Workforce Pipeline

Argonne Hosts 15th Annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day

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IGED is a diversity outreach program designed to provide 8th-grade girls an opportunity to learn about science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) careers. Students are assigned to engineer and scientist mentors who accompany the girls throughout the day's scheduled activities.

Science

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Most Complex Nanoparticle Crystal Ever Made by Design

The most complex crystal designed and built from nanoparticles has been reported by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Michigan. The work demonstrates that some of nature’s most complicated structures can be deliberately assembled if researchers can control the shapes of the particles and the way they connect using DNA. Potential applications of the cage-like structures, called clathrates, include controlling light, capturing pollutants and delivering therapeutics. New types of lenses, lasers and even Star Trek-like cloaking materials are possible.







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