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Did You Catch That? Robot’s Speed of Light Communication Could Protect You From Danger

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If you were monitoring a security camera and saw someone set down a backpack and walk away, you might pay special attention – especially if you had been alerted to watch that particular person. According to Cornell University researchers, this might be a job robots could do better than humans, by communicating at the speed of light and sharing images.

Science

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University of Alabama in Huntsville, UAH, CSPAR, Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), Rotorcraft Systems Engineering and Simulation Center (RSESC), NASA, EUSO, Super balloon, Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO), cosmic ray telescope

UAH Supplies Critical Systems for NASA 's EUSO Super Pressure Balloon

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Critical systems for NASA’s Extreme Universe Space Observatory (EUSO) Super Pressure Balloon have been supplied and calibrated by The University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Science

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biochemical engineering, stem cell technology , Graphene, Mechanical Engineering

Researchers Use Graphene, Electricity to Change Stem Cells for Nerve Regrowth

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Two Iowa State research groups are combining their expertise to change stem cells for nerve regrowth. The groups -- one led by a mechanical engineer and the other by a chemical engineer -- just published their findings in Advanced Healthcare Materials.

Science

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Energy, Clean Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Power, Wind Power, Electricity Grid, coal

Americans Use More Clean Energy in 2016

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Americans used more renewable energy in 2016 compared to the previous year, according to the most recent energy flow charts released by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall, energy consumption was nearly flat.

Science

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Lorentz transmission electron microscopy, skyrmions, Magnetic, information carriers , spintronic

NUS Researchers Invent Ultra-Thin Multilayer Film for Next-Generation Data Storage and Processing

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A team of scientists led by Associate Professor Yang Hyunsoo from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the National University of Singapore’s Faculty of Engineering has invented a novel ultra-thin multilayer film which could harness the properties of skyrmions as information carriers for storing and processing data on magnetic media.

Science

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X-Ray Spectroscopy, Biochemistry

Coming to a Lab Bench Near You: Femtosecond X-Ray Spectroscopy

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Berkeley Lab researchers have, for the first time, captured the ephemeral electron movements in a transient state of a chemical reaction using ultrafast, tabletop X-ray spectroscopy. The researchers used femtosecond pulses of X-ray light to catch the unraveling of a ring molecule that is important in biochemical and optoelectronic processes.

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Manufacturing and Materials Innovations Highlighted at Global Manufacturing and Industrialization Summit

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R&D Insights and Commercialization Strategies Shared at International Summit Organized by UNIDO and UAE Ministry of Economy

Life

Education

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Game Design, Computing, Engineering

Kennesaw State Ranked Among Top 50 Schools for Game Design

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Computer Game Design and Development program cited for strong academics, facilities.

Medicine

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Varsity Esports Come to the University of Utah

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The University of Utah and it’s nationally ranked Entertainment Arts & Engineering video game development program announced today that it is forming the U’s first college-sponsored varsity esports program.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials); Technology/Engineering/Computer Science

Green Laser Light Probes Metals for Hidden Damage (Animation)

Imagine being able to check the structural integrity of an airplane, ship or bridge, without having to dismantle it or remove any material for testing, which could further compromise the structure. That’s the promise of a new laser-based technique that chemists are developing to reveal hidden damage in metals.







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