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Medicine

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Diet, Body Weight, Infants, Childhood Obesity

Early Infant Weight Gain Could Lead to Adult Obesity

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University of Delaware researcher Jillian Trabulsi found that rapid weight gain in an infant's first six months of life is a risk factor for child- and adulthood obesity. Trabulsi’s research examines infant formula and how various compositions affect energy balance, weight gain and growth.

Medicine

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Pavlovian response, NEURON ACTIVITY, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, Tourette Syndrome, Learning

Study Identifies Brain Cells Involved in Pavlovian Response

UCLA scientists have traced the Pavlovian response to a small cluster of brain cells -- the same neurons that go awry during Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and Tourette syndrome. The research could one day help scientists find new approaches to diagnosing and treating these neurological disorders.

Science

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ants, Mulch, soil moisture, soil aggregate

Making “Mulch” Ado of Ant Hills

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Research undertaken by scientists in China reveals that ants are hardworking and beneficial insects. In the activities of their daily lives, ants help increase air, water flow, and organic matter in soil. The work done by ants even forms a type of mulch that helps hold water in the soil.

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Loss of Spouse or Partner to Suicide Linked to Physical, Mental Disorders

People who lose a partner to suicide are at increased risk for a number of mental and physical disorders, including cancer, depression, herniated discs and mood disorders than those in the general population, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.

Medicine

Science

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women & drinking, Older Women, sensitivity to alcohol, Prescr, alcohol education, alcohol screening, Alcohol Treatment

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Mar-2017 5:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Science

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Prenatal alcohol exposure, academic problems, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders , Brain Imaging, math performance, Brain Development In Children

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Mar-2017 5:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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small molecule drugs, ONC201, Prostate Cancer, Endometrial Cancer, Phase II clinical trials, New Jersey, Rutgers University

‘First in Human’ Trial Defines Safe Dosage for Small Molecule Drug ONC201 for Solid Cancer Tumors

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A ‘first in human’ clinical trial examining the small molecule drug ONC201 in cancer patients with advanced solid tumors shows that this investigational drug is well tolerated at the recommended phase II dose. That’s according to Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigators whose research also showed early signs of clinical benefit in patients with advanced prostate and endometrial cancers.

Science

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Energy, Battery, Fuel Cells, Bacteria, bacteria fuel cells, Binghamton, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, Microbial, Microbial Fuel Cells, self-sustaining cell, Power, Electrical Engineering, bioelectricity, Technology, phototrophic bacteria, Power Generation, Electricity, battery design, power sources, Clean E

Researchers Create Self-Sustaining Bacteria-Fueled Power Cell

Instead of oil, coal, or even solar energy, self-sustaining bacterial fuel cells may power the future. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria.

Medicine

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Diabetic Retinopathy, Retinopathy Of Prematurity, Premature Babies, Diabetes, Angiogenesis, Lucentis, Eylea, Ranibizumab, aflibercept, Drug Discovery

Study Suggests New Way to Prevent Vision Loss in Diabetics and Premature Babies

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Researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, part of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have identified a new molecule that induces the formation of abnormal blood vessels in the eyes of diabetic mice. The study, “Secretogranin III as a disease-associated ligand for antiangiogenic therapy of diabetic retinopathy,” which will be published March 22 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this molecule may prevent similarly aberrant blood vessels from damaging the vision of not only diabetics, but also premature infants.

Science

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Tree Of Life, Cornell University, Taxonomy, Ecology & Evolution, Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, Biodiversity

Cornell Evolutionary Biologist Explains How to 'Walk the Tree of Life'

Harry Greene, professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Cornell University, and Cissy Ballen of the University of Minnesota have just published a paper in PLOS Biology, “Walking and Talking the Tree of Life: Why and How to Teach About Biodiversity,” discussing why the evolutionary TOL approach to biodiversity is best, to what extent the traditional taxonomy is still used and how to teach TOL using an active learning approach.







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