Feature Channels:

All Journal News

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

T Cell, Vaccination

Penn Team Tracks Rare T Cells in Blood to Better Understand Annual Flu Vaccine

WherryScienceImmunologyimageFeb17.png

A team has found a way to identify the small population of circulating helper T cells present in the blood after an annual flu vaccine to monitor their contribution to antibody strength. A technique that identifies these helper immune cells could inform future vaccine design, especially for vulnerable populations.

Medicine

Channels:

Hearing Loss, hidden hearing loss, Audiology, Ear And Hearing, Noise Induced Hearing Loss, Guillain-Barré syndrome, myelin diseases, Demyelination Diseases

Second Cause of Hidden Hearing Loss Identified

HHLpic.JPG

Some people can pass a hearing test but have trouble understanding speech in a noisy environment. New research identifies a new mechanism for this condition just years after its discovery.

Medicine

Channels:

Micro-RNA May Amplify Effectiveness of Sorafenib in Difficult Liver Cancer Cases

mir125a1.jpg

Only 25% of patients respond to sorafenib treatment, so researchers have endeavored to understand its mechanism of action and discover a way to boost its effectiveness.

Science

Channels:

Placenta, Autism, UC Davis MIND Institute, DLL1, Methylation, epigentics

Placenta Provides Time Capsule for Autism Studies

LaSalle_janine.JPG

In two recent studies, researchers at UC Davis have shown that placental tissue can provide critical information about the epigenetic landscape that influences fetal development.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

diversity training, Workplace Issues, Cultural Differences, organizational bias, Cultural Awareness, business diversity, diversity programs

New Research Helps Organizations Deliver Stronger Diversity Training

While diversity training programs are a good way to build awareness of cultural differences, they usually are not as effective at changing attitudes and behaviors toward diverse groups in the workplace, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.

Medicine

Channels:

MU Professor First in Nation to Develop Medical Curriculum Tailored to Native Americans

melissa_lewis-2-600x800.jpg

Of all racial minorities, Native Americans have the most dramatic health inequalities in the U.S., including significantly higher rates of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Type 2 diabetes and substance abuse. Melissa Lewis, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the MU School of Medicine, led the first project in the nation to develop a mandatory medical school curriculum about indigenous health.

Science

Channels:

ACS Catalysis, Basic Energy Sciences, Basic Energy Research, Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Energy Frontier Reseaerch Centers, Early Car, Science, Catalyst, Catalysis, Catalysts, Chemistry, Chemical Science, chemical sciences, Protons, Proton Transfer, reversible catalysts, Reversible, Reversing, Hydrogen, Hydrogen and fuel cells, hydrogen & fuel cell

There and Back Again: Catalyst Mediates Energy-Efficient Proton Transport for Reversibility

catalysishighlightprint.jpg

Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that a complex with a proton pathway and stabilized by outer coordination sphere interactions is reversible for hydrogen production/oxidation at room temperature and pressure.

Science

Channels:

Climate-Driven Permafrost Thaw

133573_web.jpg

In bitter cold regions like northwestern Canada, permafrost has preserved relict ground-ice and vast glacial sedimentary stores in a quasi-stable state. These landscapes therefore retain a high potential for climate-driven transformation.

Science

Channels:

Congo River Fish Evolution Shaped by Intense Rapids

133580_web.jpg

Genomic study in lower Congo reveals microscale diversification.

Medicine

Channels:

Microbiome, Diabetes, Metabolic Diseases, Biochemistry, Bacteriology, Animal Research, mice

From Mice, Clues to Microbiome’s Influence on Metabolic Disease

Germ_free_mice15_6786.jpg

The community of microorganisms that resides in the gut, known as the microbiome, has been shown to work in tandem with the genes of a host organism to regulate insulin secretion, a key variable in the onset of the metabolic disease diabetes. That is the primary finding of a study published this week by a team led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

Medicine

Channels:

Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Cancer, Leukemia, Hematopoietic Stem Cell, FLT3, RUNX1

Tumor Suppressor Promotes Some Acute Myeloid Leukemias, Study Reveals

Behrens.jpg

Researchers in Germany have discovered that a tumor suppressor protein thought to prevent acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can actually promote a particularly deadly form of the disease. The study, “RUNX1 cooperates with FLT3-ITD to induce leukemia,” which will be published online February 17 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that targeting this protein could be an effective treatment for certain AML patients.

Medicine

Channels:

DMC, children's hospital of Michigan, Pediatric Kidney Stones, pediatric nephrology, Dr. Larisa Kovacevic, Nephrolithiasis, Children, Proteomics, Hypercalciuria, Urinary apolipoproteins, Pediatric Kidney Stone Clinic, Detroit, Michigan

Detroit Urology Research Team Suggests Link Between Lipoproteins and Kidney Stones in Children

KovacevicLarisa1_1.jpg

A unique study recently published in the authoritative Pediatric Nephrology medical journal shows that excess lipoproteins and fatty acids may be associated with the development of painful and often chronic kidney stones in children.

Medicine

Channels:

Physics, Chemisry, Magnetic, NMR, University of Warwick, Molecules, molecules and magnets, Phenomenon, self-assembling , Solution, Solid State

Molecular Phenomenon Discovered by Advanced NMR Facility

3539__0057.jpg

Cutting edge technology has shown a molecule self-assembling into different forms when passing between solution state to solid state, and back again – a curious phenomenon in science – says research by the University of Warwick.

Medicine

Channels:

Appendectomy, Appendicitis, Antibiotics, Children

Antibiotics Could Be Alternative to Surgery as Treatment for Appendicitis

A study by researchers at the University of Southampton shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery. The systematic review of existing literature is published in Pediatrics.

Science

Channels:

Lemur, Lemurs, Facial Recognition, Biometrics, lemurID, Madagascar, Anil Jain, Michigan State University

Can Facial Recognition Systems Help Save Lemurs?

Michigan State University’s Anil Jain adapted his human facial recognition system to create LemurFaceID, the first computer facial recognition system for lemurs. Once optimized, LemurFaceID can assist with long-term research of the endangered species.

Medicine

Channels:

salt, Blood Pressure, Chronic Kidney Disease

Limiting Salt Consumption Lowers Blood Pressure in Patients with Kidney Disease

• Receiving advice on limiting salt consumption helped kidney disease patients lower their systolic blood pressure by an average of 11 mmHg. • Limiting salt intake also reduced excess fluid retention that is common among patients with kidney disease.

Medicine

Channels:

Transplant Rejection

Discovery May Help Prevent Tissue Scarring and Rejection of Transplanted Kidneys

• During rejection of a transplanted kidney, certain immune cells transform into connective tissue cells, which produce collagen and other fibers. • This transition, which is mediated by the TGF-/Smad3 signaling pathway, leads to scarring and decreased kidney function.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

economic cost

Variability in Local Costs of Substance Abuse Across California

The average news consumer might be surprised to learn that the economic costs of alcohol abuse far exceed those related to illegal drug use. In California, alcohol abuse cost $129 billion in 2010, $3,450 per California resident. That was almost three times the $44 billion bill for illicit drug use. The largest cost contributors were mortality, impaired driving, and violence. The costs varied greatly from city to city and county to county.

Science

Channels:

Scarcity of Resources Led to Violence in Prehistoric Central California

MarkAllen.jpg

A longtime Cal Poly Pomona anthropology professor who studies violence among prehistoric people in California has been published in a prestigious journal.

Medicine

Channels:

Dermatology, Pediatrics, Infectious Diseases, antibiotic resisistance, antiomicrobial resistanc, MRSA

Antibiotic Effective Against Drug-Resistant Bacteria in Pediatric Skin Infections

mrsa_niaid.jpg

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterial scourge that is resistant to most common antibiotics and thus difficult to treat, particularly in children where it commonly causes complicated skin and skin structure infections. In a randomized, controlled clinical trial — the first of its kind — a multi-institution research team reports that daptomycin, part of a new class of antibiotics currently approved only for use in adults, is effective and well-tolerated in children.







Chat now!