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Science

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Earth, core, Mantle, Crust, piles, thromochemical piles, deep mantle piles, large low shear velocity provinces, LLSVPs, ultra low velocity zones, ULVZs, Plate Tectonics, core-mantle boundary, Earthquakes, Seismology, Geophysics

The Deep Roots of Catastrophe

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A University of Utah seismologist analyzed seismic waves that bombarded Earth’s core, and believes he got a look at the earliest roots of Earth’s most cataclysmic kind of volcanic eruption. But don’t worry. He says it won’t happen for perhaps 200 million years.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Altruism, Early Childhood Development, Empathy, China, Earthquake, Disaster, Adversity, Psychological Effects, Psychological Development

Disasters Prompt Older Children to Be More Giving

A natural disaster can bring out the best in older children, prompting 9-year-olds to be more willing to share, while 6-year-olds become more selfish. Researchers made this finding in a rare natural experiment in China around the time of a horrific earthquake.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Haiti, haiti earthquake, Public Health

Three Years After Quake, Haiti 'Aching' for Public Health Expertise

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Lora Iannotti, PhD, assistant professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis, was working in Haiti when an earthquake devastated that country three years ago this week. She has been back to Haiti 10 times since Jan. 12, 2010, and says the country is "literally aching for public health expertise."

Science

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seismic activity, Tectonics, Volcanic Eruptions, Tsunami, Pacific Rim, Kamchatka, Russian Far East

Russian Far East Holds Seismic Hazards That Could Threaten Pacific Basin

Research shows that the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands, long shrouded in secrecy by the Soviet government, are a seismic and volcanic hotbed with a potential to trigger tsunamis that pose a risk to the rest of the Pacific Basin.

Science

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Earthquake, Infrasound, Acoustical Society

World’s Largest Subwoofer: Earthquakes ‘Pump’ Ground to Produce Infrasound

Earthquakes sway buildings, buckle terrain, and rumble – both audibly and in infrasound, frequencies below the threshold of human hearing. New computer modeling by a team of researchers indicates that most of the low-frequency infrasound comes from an unexpected source: the actual “pumping” of the Earth’s surface. The researchers confirmed their models by studying data from an actual earthquake.

Science

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geofoam, Natural Gas, Pipelines, Earthquakes, seismic mitigation, Civil Engineering, plastic foam, Faults, faulting, seismic safety

Geofoam Protects Pipelines From Earthquakes

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Lightweight and stiff as a board, a plastic foam material is being used to protect Utah’s natural gas pipelines from rupturing during earthquakes, thanks to help from a University of Utah engineer.

Science

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Earthquakes, Quakes, Seismology, Plate Tectonics, Indian Ocean, Indo-Australian plate, great earthquakes, Faults, strike-slip, Tsunamis, April 11, 2012

Magnitude-8.7 Quake Was Part of Crustal Plate Breakup

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Seismologists have known for years that the Indo-Australian plate of Earth’s crust is slowly breaking apart, but they saw it in action last April when at least four faults broke in a magnitude-8.7 earthquake that may be the largest of its type ever recorded.

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Scripps Researchers Pinpoint Hot Spots as Earthquake Trigger Points

Scientists at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego have come a step closer to deciphering some of the basic mysteries and mechanisms behind earthquakes and how average-sized earthquakes may evolve into massive earthquakes.

Science

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Cascadia Subduction Zone, Earthquakes, subduction zone earthquakes, Pacific Northwest

13-Year Cascadia Study Complete – and Northwest Earthquake Risk Looms Large

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A comprehensive analysis of the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the Pacific Northwest coast confirms that the region has had numerous earthquakes over the past 10,000 years, and suggests that the southern Oregon coast may be most vulnerable based on recurrence frequency.

Science

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Oregon State University, Earthquakes, Earth Science, Robert Yeats, Disaster, Disaster And Pandemic Preparedness

New Book Looks at Hotspots Around the World for Mega-Quakes

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Where will the next mega-earthquake strike in the world? It could be in Kabul, or Caracas, or Tehran. A new book by Robert Yeats of Oregon State University, who warned of a major quake in Haiti one week before it happened, looks at hot spots around the world.

Science

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Seismic, Earthquakes, Structural Engineering

Engineers Put Five-Story Building on Seismic Shake Table to Test Earthquake and Fire Readiness

What happens when you put a fully equipped five-story building, which includes an intensive care unit, a surgery suite, piping and air conditioning, fire barriers and even a working elevator, through series of high-intensity earthquakes?

Science

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Oaxaca, Earthquake, Geophyscics, Expert Alert

Oaxaca Quake Offers Lesson in Power and Rupture Dynamics

Rowena Lohman, a geophysicist in the department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University, comments on the powerful March 20 earthquake centered near Oaxaco, Mexico, as officials continue to assess the surprisingly modest damage caused by the event.

Science

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Georgia Institute Of Technology, Volcano, Volcanoes, Earthquake, Earthquakes, Tsunami, Caldera, Greece, Santorini, Minoan, Eruption

Santorini: The Ground is Moving Again in Paradise

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The Santorini caldera, which sits underneath a famous tourist destination, is awake again and rapidly deforming at levels never seen before.

Science

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Japan earthquake, Tsunami, Research, Flood zone, Mapping

Mapping Japan's Devastating Tsunami to Prepare for Future Events

Georgia Tech Associate Professor Hermann Fritz and his research team are studying the impact of the tsunami on the Sanriku coast. Using eyewitness video and terrestrial laser scanners from atop the highest buildings that surveyed the tsunami, Fritz has mapped the tsunami’s height and flood zone to learn more about the flow of the devastating currents.

Science

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Japan earthquake, Japan, Japan earthquake, nuclear radiation risk, , Japan's, Japan radiation risk, Tsunami, Tsunamis, Tsunamistruck, Tsunami Survivors, Earthquake, earthquake in Japan, Earthquake Prediction, Earthquake Research, Nuclear Accident

On First Anniversary of Japan Disaster, Experts Offer an Informed Look Back — and a Look Ahead

A year after the devastating tsunami and subsequent nuclear disaster that struck Japan’s northeastern coast, Florida State University researchers in a variety of disciplines are prepared to discuss the lasting effects of the March 11, 2011, events and offer insights into what the future may hold.

Science

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Earthquake, Japan earthquake, Japan, Anniversary

Listening to the 9.0-Magnitude Japanese Earthquake

Zhigang Peng, associate professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, has converted the seismic waves from last year's historic Japanese earthquake into audio files. The results allow experts and general audiences to “hear” what the quake sounded like as it moved through the earth and around the globe.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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great tohoku earthquake, Japan, Earthquake, Tsunami, Japan earthquake, Japan radiation risk, japan law and , japanese politics, Geology, Tectonics, food and radiation, Auto Industry, Toyota, fukushima, experts available

One Year Later, Impact of ‘Great Tohoku’ Quake Still Being Felt

On March 11, 2011, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded struck about 40 miles off Japan. Cornell University researchers who work in fields from anthropology and law to geology, soil science and the auto industry are available to talk with the media about the evolving understanding of the earthquake, the tsunami and Japan’s ongoing recovery.

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Geoscientists Use Numerical Model to Better Forecast Forces Behind Earthquakes

William E. Holt, Ph.D. and Attreyee Ghosh, Ph.D. studied the movement of Earth’s tectonic plates and the forces behind them.

Science

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shape-memory alloys, Earthquake, earthquake materials, earthquake resistant materials, Thermal Camera, Temperature, Modeling, thermo-mechanical model, earthquake engineering, smart materials , Bearings, Columns, Beams, Stress Analysis, Strain, Loading, surface temperature

Model Analyzes Shape-Memory Alloys for Use in Earthquake-Resistant Structures

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Recent earthquake damage has exposed the vulnerability of existing structures to strong ground movement. At Georgia Tech, researchers are analyzing shape-memory alloys for their potential use in constructing seismic-resistant structures.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Haiti, Earthquake, Haiti Memory Project, Religion, Politics, Culture, Oral History, University Of Kentucky, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, New York University, Medicine

Oral History Project Captures Stories of Haiti Earthquake Survivors

The Haiti Memory Project is working to make available to the public more than 100 firsthand accounts of the earthquake and its aftermath, as well as Haitians' thoughts on topics like politics, culture, medicine and religion.







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