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UD Professors: Nation Has Fallen Behind on Offshore Wind Power

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University of Delaware professors say that the nation has fallen behind on offshore wind power. Their findings show that while offshore wind turbines have been successfully deployed in Europe since 1991, the U.S. is further from commercial-scale offshore wind deployment today than it was in 2005.

Science

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Optical, Communications, Fibre Optic

Southampton Scientists Reveal First Results Using New National Dark Fibre Infrastructure

Southampton scientists will reveal the first research results from the new National Dark Fibre Infrastructure Service (NDFIS) at an international conference this Autumn.

Life

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Law and Public Policy

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GW Becomes Host of Institute for Information Infrastructure Protection in Collaboration with SRI International

As of Oct. 1 the George Washington University will be the new host of the Institute for Infrastructure Protection (I3P).

Science

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Concrete, concrete beams, concrete bridge, concrete bridge girders, infrastructure damage, prestressed concrete

Aging Infrastructure Requires a Better Understanding of the Long-Term Behavior of Bridge Girders

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Long-term durability is a major issue for today’s infrastructure. In order to create concrete bridges with longer service lives and better performance, we must better understand the long-term behavior of these members.

Medicine

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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Airport, Travel, airline quality, Airline Quality Rating, Holiday air travel, Holiday, Holiday Season, Airline

VIDEO AVAILABLE: Holiday Travel Forecast and Live Press Conference with Researcher

At 11 a.m. EDT Thursday, September 10 the Airline Quality Report will be presented live and reporters will be able to engage with one of the study's co-authors.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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traffic flow, Bicycling, Commuting, Road Safety, Traffic Accidents

Study: Better Signs Could Help Reduce Friction Between Motorists, Bicyclists

Web-based survey finds "Bicyclists May Use Full Lane," more effective message for signs

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Hurricane, Katrina, Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans

Flood Damage After Katrina Could Have Been Prevented, S&T Expert Says

A decade after hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, experts say the flooding that caused over 1,800 deaths and billions of dollars in property damage could have been prevented had the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers retained an external review board to double-check its flood-wall designs.

Science

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Network Science, Complex Systems, Complex Systems Theory, Percolation, informatics and computing, Transporation, Power Grid, Disease Outbreak

IU Researcher Devises Method to Untangle, Analyze 'Controlled Chaos'

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A researcher at Indiana University has developed a new mathematical framework to more effectively analyze “controlled chaos." The new method could potentially be used to improve the resilience of complex critical systems, such as air traffic control networks and power grids, or slow the spread of threats across large networks, such as disease outbreaks.

Science

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Power Grid, Smart Grid, transactive control

Smart Stuff: IQ of Northwest Power Grid Raised, Energy Saved

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Smart grid technologies and approaches can improve energy efficiency and possibly reduce power costs, according to the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project’s final report.

Science

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Muons, Cosmic Rays, Infrastructure, X-rays, infrastructure maintenance, muon tomography, J.M. Durham, E. Guardincerri, C.L. Morris, J. Bacon, J. Fabritius, S. Fellows, D. Poulson, K. Plaud-Ramos, J. Renshaw, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Electric Power Research Institute, AIP Advances

Using Muons from Cosmic Rays to Find Fraying Infrastructure

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Seeking a better way to identify faulty energy infrastructure before it fails, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using subatomic particles called muons to analyze the thickness of concrete slabs and metal pipes. Their technique, described in a June 30 paper in the journal AIP Advances, from AIP Publishing, is a way to safely and non-invasively find worn infrastructure components using background radiation already present in the environment.







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