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Ancient Hominid 'Hanky Panky' Also Influenced Spread of STIs

With recent studies proving that almost everyone has a little bit of Neanderthal DNA in them----up to 5 percent of the human genome--- it's become clear our ancestors not only had some serious hominid 'hanky panky' going on, but with it, a potential downside: the spread of sexually transmitted infections, or STIs.

Life

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Black Sea, Professor Jon Adams, Black Sea MAP, Maritime Archaeology

State of the Art Maritime Archaeology Expedition Conducted in Black Sea

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An expedition mapping submerged ancient landscapes, the first of its kind in the Black Sea, is making exciting discoveries.

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Apes Understand That Some Things Are All in Your Head

We all know that the way someone sees the world, and the way it really is, are not always the same. This ability to recognize that someone’s beliefs may differ from reality has long been seen as unique to humans. But new research on chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans suggests our primate relatives may also be able to tell when something is just in your head. The study was led by researchers of Duke University, Kyoto University, the University of St. Andrews and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Medicine

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DNA, Anthropology, Pacific Islanders, Ancient Dna, Dna Sequence, Dna Sequencing, Genetics, genes, Binghamton University, SUNY Binghamton, State University of New York at Binghamton, remote oceania, Nature, Tonga, vanuatu, genetic model, Papua New Guinea, Bismarck Archipelago, Settlers, Migration, Genetic Diversity, Ancestry, Genomic, genomic insight, southwest pa

Analysis of DNA From Early Settlers of the Pacific Overturns Leading Genetic Model

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A scientific team led by researchers at Harvard Medical School, University College Dublin, and the Max Planck institute for the Science of Human History, and including Binghamton University Associate Professor of Anthropology Andrew D. Merriwether, analyzed DNA from people who lived in Tonga and Vanuatu between 2,500 and 3,100 years ago, and were among the first people to live in these islands. The results overturn the leading genetic model for this last great movement of humans to unoccupied but habitable lands.

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Evidence Suggest that Humans Came to the Americas Earlier than Previously Thought

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Recent research from the Pampas region of Argentina supports the hypothesis that early Homo sapiens arrived in the Americas earlier than the Clovis hunters did, 13,000 years ago.

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New Evidence Shifts the Timeline Back for Human Arrival in the Americas

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Ancient artifacts found at an archeological site in Argentina suggest that humans occupied South America earlier than previously thought.

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Ancient Skeleton Discovered on Antikythera Shipwreck

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An international research team discovered a human skeleton during its ongoing excavation of the famous Antikythera Shipwreck (circa 65 B.C.).

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Arts and Humanities

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Textile, Textiles, indigo, dye, Dyeing, PERU, Huaca, Archaeological Dig, Anthropology

Researchers Identify Oldest Textile Dyed Indigo, Reflecting Scientific Knowledge From 6,200 Years Ago

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A George Washington University researcher has identified a 6,200-year-old indigo-blue fabric from Huaca, Peru, making it one of the oldest-known cotton textiles in the world and the oldest known textile decorated with indigo blue.

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Africa, Genetics, Human Diversity, Population Genetics, Evolution, Geography, Ecology, Biogeography

Genetics of African Khoesan Populations Maps to Kalahari Desert Geography

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Geography and ecology are key factors that have influenced the genetic makeup of human groups in southern Africa, according to new research discussed in the journal GENETICS, a publication of the Genetics Society of America. By investigating the ancestries of twenty-two KhoeSan groups, including new samples from the Nama and the ≠Khomani, researchers conclude that the genetic clustering of southern African populations is closely tied to the ecogeography of the Kalahari Desert region.

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Biofuels Are Not Carbon Neutral, Predicting Jellyfish, Health Issues From Fracking, and More in the Environment News Source

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