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Science

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soil, Biology, Ecosystem, Australia, shrublands, Montreal, Ecology, Science (magazine), soil biota, plant species

Why Are Australia’s Shrublands Like ‘Knee-High Tropical Rainforests’?

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A new UdeM study of the flora "Down Under" breaks new ground by showing that soil biota play an important role in the maintenance of plant diversity in species-rich ecosystems.

Science

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Why Lyme Disease Is Common in the North, Rare in the South

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It's the heat and the humidity, USGS-led study finds

Medicine

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Michigan Tech, Adrienne Minerick, Lynn Mazzoleni, Maryam Khaksari, Health & Wellness, Tears, Nutrient Deficiencies, Vitamins, Chemical Engineering

Crybaby: The Vitamins in Your Tears

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Would you rather shed a couple tears or have your blood drawn? Testing for nutritional deficiencies in blood can be invasive and expensive. A team led by Michigan Technological University explored what it takes to switch to tears instead and their study focuses on the nutritional connection between infants and parents.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Intimate Partner Violence, Abusive Relationships, African-American women, Physical Abuse, Sexual Abuse, Domestic Violence, Self Defense, Bystander Intervention, Coping Behaviors

Study Finds Three Primary Categories Used by African-American Women Facing Intimate Partner Violence

African-American women in abusive relationships use a variety of strategies pulled from three general categories to survive intimate partner violence (IPV), according to a new University at Buffalo study recently published in the journal Social Work.

Science

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bats, place cells, grid cells, Memory, Ulanovsky

Found: Neurons That Orient Bats Toward Destination

Bats – like humans – can find their favorite fruit stand (or coffee shop) even when it’s hidden behind a screen or tall buildings. How? The Weizmann Institute of Science’s Prof. Nachum Ulanovsky and team have now identified the neurons that point bats in the right direction, even when their destination is obscured. This could aid understanding of some aspects of Alzheimer’s.

Science

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Ocean Acidification to Hit West Coast Dungeness Crab Fishery, New Assessment Shows

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The acidification of the ocean expected as seawater absorbs increasing amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere will reverberate through the West Coast’s marine food web, but not necessarily in the ways you might expect, new research shows.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Abortion, Financial Assistance, Reproductive Rights, Health Care Costs, abortion access, minority and disadvantaged women, minority and disadvantaged youth, National Network of Abortion Funds, Tiller Memorial Fund, Health Care Policy

Study Finds Vulnerable Young, Single Women of Color Most Likely to Receive Financial Assistance for Abortion

–Abortion fund patients who get aid to help pay for abortions are younger and more likely to be African American when compared to general abortion patients in the U.S., according to the findings of a study just published online in the journal Social Work in Health Care.

Medicine

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Lung Cancer, Small Cell Lung Cancer, c-Myc

Huntsman Cancer Institute Research Holds Promise for Personalized Lung Cancer Treatments

New research from scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah uncovered distinct types of tumors within small cell lung cancer that look and act differently from one another. Scientists also identified a targeted drug combination that worked well with one specific tumor type. The study was published today in Cancer Cell. The findings suggest small cell lung cancer should not be treated as a uniform disease.

Medicine

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Takanari Inoue, Cilia, HAIR, Decapitation, inpp5e, PIP2

Some Cells Need a ‘Haircut’ Before Duplicating

Many of our cells are equipped with a hairlike "antenna" that relays information about the external environment to the cell, and scientists have already discovered that the appearance and disappearance of these so-called primary cilia are synchronized with the process of cellular duplication, called mitosis.

Medicine

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Seeing Vape Pen in Use Boosts Desire to Smoke Among Young Adults

The newer e-cigarette vape pens (AKA vaporizers) may not look like cigarettes, but they stimulate the urge to smoke as powerfully as watching someone smoke a traditional tobacco cigarette.

Medicine

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Coronary plaque regression, cocaine use, Noncalcified coronary plaque volume index, Contrast enhanced coronary CT angiograp, Cash-based incentive intervention

Decreasing Cocaine Use Leads to Regression of Coronary Artery Disease

People who use cocaine regularly are at high risk of coronary artery disease. A study in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), reports that stopping or reducing cocaine use can potentially reverse the process of coronary atherosclerosis. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.

Medicine

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Inflammatory And Autoimmune Diseases, Rheumatology, Inflammation, Fibromyalgia, Obesity, Exercise, Exercise and chronic disease, Weight Loss, Diabetes, Immunology

Exercise … It Does a Body Good: 20 Minutes Can Act as Anti-Inflammatory

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It’s well known that regular physical activity has health benefits, including weight control, strengthening the heart, bones and muscles and reducing the risk of certain diseases. Recently, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found how just one session of moderate exercise can also act as an anti-inflammatory. The findings have encouraging implications for chronic diseases like arthritis, fibromyalgia and for more pervasive conditions, such as obesity.

Science

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Materials Science, Nanoscience

Fast Track Control Accelerates Switching of Quantum Bits

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An international collaboration among physicists at the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, McGill University and the University of Konstanz recently demonstrated a new framework for faster control of a quantum bit—the basic unit of information in yet-to-be created quantum computers—in findings published online Nov. 28 in Nature Physics. Their experiments on a single electron in a diamond chip could create quantum devices less prone to errors when operated at high speeds.

Medicine

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Depression, depression and women, Low Birth Weight, Low Birth Weight Infants, Mental Health, medical research studies, Medical Research, Biomarker, Biomarkers & Prevention, biomarker discovery, Exercise, Exercise and Depression, newborn development, Postpartum Depression, Postpartum, Pregnancy, Pregnancy and Childbirth, Pregnancy and Delivery

Biomarker in Pregnant Women Linked to Depression, Low Fetal Birth Weight

Depression is very common during pregnancy, with as many as one in seven women suffering from the illness and more than a half million women impacted by postpartum depression in the U.S. alone. The disorder not only affects the mother’s mood, but has also been linked to influencing the newborn’s development, according to recent research. In a study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology, research from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that BDNF levels change during pregnancy, and can cause depression in the mother and low birth weight in the baby.

Science

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Biofuels, biorenewble chemicals, pyrolysis, thermochemical conversion

Iowa State Engineer Helps Journal Highlight How Pyrolysis Can Advance the Bioeconomy

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Iowa State's Robert C. Brown is a guest editor of the current issue of the journal Energy Technology. The special issue features 20 scientific papers about Brown's specialty: using pyrolysis technologies to convert biomass into fuels, chemicals and fertilizers.

Science

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Joint Bioenergy institute, Great lakes Bioenergy Research Center, stilbene, dioxygenase, Carotenoid, Lignin, Biomass, Bioenergy

Finding Diamonds in the Rough

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New crystallography finding benefits bioenergy industry.

Medicine

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Journal of the Endocrine Society, Open Access Journal, Open Access, scholarly journals, scholarly publishing, Oxford University Press, Endocrine Society, Endocrinology, Endocrinologist

Endocrine Society Launches First Open Access Journal

The Endocrine Society unveiled the first issue of its Open Access scholarly publication the Journal of the Endocrine Society (JES) today, marking the first time the Society has introduced a new journal under its ownership in nearly 30 years.

Medicine

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Zika infection, Sujan Shresta, Center for Infectious Disease

T Cells Join the Fight Against Zika

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The worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over but many key questions remain, such as why the virus persists in certain tissues after the systemic infection has cleared; how does the immune system counteract the virus and protect against reinfection; what determines the likelihood of long-term complications?

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Video Games, video games and addiciton, Social Media, Instant Messaging, Mental Health

In Teens, Strong Friendships May Mitigate Depression Associated with Excessive Video Gaming

Teenagers who play video games for more than four hours a day suffer from symptoms of depression, but frequent use of social media and instant messaging may mitigate symptoms of game addiction in these teens, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests.

Life

Law and Public Policy

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Homicide And Psychopathology, sentencing reform, Criminal Justice

Offenders’ Deadly Thoughts May Hold Answer to Reducing Crime

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It's something many of us say in anger, but don't mean. However, for a small percentage of people homicidal thoughts are very real. Iowa State's Matt DeLisi says identifying offenders with homicidal thoughts could change how we sentence the most serious offenders.







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