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Climate Change, Wildfires, Yellowstone

Climate Change to Increase Yellowstone Wildfires Dramatically

Research by UC Merced Professor Anthony Westerling shows large fires could become annual events by 2050, transforming the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem in fundamental ways

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rangeland ecology and management, Great Basin, Sagebrush Ecosystem Management, urban-rural, fuels treatment, Restoration, social acceptability, Trust, Wildfires

Wildfires Ignite Issues of Land Management and Public Trust in Agencies

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The wildfires currently raging in the southwestern United States bring issues of land management into the public eye. Land management actions, such as prescribed fire, grazing, herbicides, felling trees, and mowing, can restore native plants and reduce wildfire. However, the public’s view of land management and their trust in land management agencies can pose another obstacle.

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Birds, Climate Change, Conservation Planning, fire suppression

Some Desert Birds Less Affected By Wildfires and Climate Change

A new Baylor University study has found that some bird species in the desert southwest are less affected, and in some cases positively influenced, by widespread fire through their habitat. In fact, the Baylor researchers say that fire actually helps some bird species because of the habitat that is formed after a fire is positive for the bird’s prey needs.

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Massive Fires Remain Destructive After the Burn Has Gone

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This season’s massive Arizona fires making headlines around the globe have destroyed dozens of structures and burned nearly three-quarters of a million acres. They also are contributing to global warming, scientists say, by upsetting the carbon balance while they are burning and for years to come.

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Wildfire Modeling and Prevention

Wildfires are increasing in both absolute number and severity in the American southwest and this trend is predicted to continue over decades to come.

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Wildfires, Wildfire Experts, Climate Change, Desert

Baylor University Researcher Available to Speak about Wildfires and Climate Change

A Baylor University expert is available to journalists for interviews about how climate change in the desert southwest will decrease the likelihood of widespread and intense wildfires, such as the one in Arizona, over the next 50 years.

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‘Overgrown’ Forests Fueling Catastrophic Wallow Fire, NAU Expert Says

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Forest experts have warned for years that millions of small-diameter trees are a threat to the nation’s forests, and the massive Wallow Fire in eastern Arizona is further evidence.

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Rangelands, Wildfire

Survival of Grassland Plants After Wildfire Shows Resilience, Minimal Lasting Impact

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Prescribed fires are often used to control undesirable species and enhance herbaceous biomass production. But what are the results when a wildfire burns out of control? In March 2006, more than 367,000 hectares burned in wildfires known as the East Amarillo Complex that raged in the U.S. Texas Panhandle. By studying the survival and regrowth of plants from these wildfires, scientists can learn more about its effects on the ecosystem.

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Rangeland, Rangelands, Land Management

Traditional Timing of Prescribed Burns Creates Missed Opportunities

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Land managers know the benefits of prescribed burning of fields, grasslands, and forests, but finding an appropriate time to conduct a burn can pose a problem. If weather doesn’t cooperate in the typical late winter/early spring time frame, a burn may be put off until another year. This can cause increased costs when workload and land management goals are not met.

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Alaska, Alaskan , black spruce, Forests, Climate Change, Carbon Emissions, Greenhouse Gas, Forest Fires

Frequent, Severe Fires Turn Alaskan Forests into a Carbon Production Line

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Alaskan forests used to be key players in Mother Nature’s game plan for regulating carbon dioxide levels in the air. But now, American and Canadian researchers report that climate change is causing wildfires to burn more widely and severely, turning Alaska's black spruce forests from carbon repositories to generators of it.







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