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Life

Arts and Humanities

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Italy, Tuscany, Tuscan Sun, Nancy De Grummond, Archeology, Artifacts, Etruscan, Cetamura Del Chianti, Greek, Romans, Ancient World, Pottery, Alphabet, Religion, GODS, Mythology, Priests, Haruspices, Literature, Architecture, Research, Scythians, Mediterra

Under the Tuscan Sun, Professor Uncovers Etruscan Secrets

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This summer, Nancy Thomson de Grummond is heading back to Italy "” just as she has done nearly ever year since 1983. Although she will be spending plenty of time in the sun, this is no vacation: De Grummond, Professor of Classics at Florida State University, will be leading another group of FSU students into the Tuscan countryside to learn more about the region's ancient residents, the Etruscans.

Science

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Fossil, Record, Biodiversity, Bivalves, Evolution, Paleontology

Paleontologists Learn How Not to Become a Fossil

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The best way to avoid becoming a fossil is to be small and live in deep, tropical waters. So say four paleontologists who have published a detailed, global study of clam preservation. Their work is intended to enhance evolutionary studies by determining what's missing from the fossil record and why.

Science

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Biology, Ecology.Forestry

Ancient Ants Arose 140-168 Million Years Ago

Ants are considerably older than previously believed, having originated 140 to 168 million years ago, according to new research on the cover of this week's issue of the journal Science.

Science

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Biology

New Fossils Fill Evolutionary Gap Between Fish and Land Animals

Working in rocks more than 375 million years old far above the Arctic Circle, paleontologists have discovered a remarkable new fossil species that represents the most compelling evidence yet of an intermediate stage between fish and early limbed animals.

Science

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Tambora, Archaeology, Volcano, Indonesia

Scientist Discovers Lost Kingdom of Tambora

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The largest volcanic eruption in human history extinguished the tiny island kingdom of Tambora in Indonesia in 1815. A University of Rhode Island scientist has unearthed the first remnants of a Tamboran village under 10 feet of ash to reveal clues about its culture.

Science

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Evolution, Social Behavior, Primates, Cooperation, Predation

Scientists Discuss Evolutionary Roots of Social Behavior

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Researchers have long reflected on that most intriguing of evolutionary questions: what led to the emergence of social behavior?

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Anthropology, Blogs, Blogging, Evolution, Archaeology, Education

Anthropology Blog Bridges Worlds of Academia and Public Interest

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Anthropologist John Hawks has created a public interest weblog that covers a remarkably rich range of topics about anthropology and evolution "” and delivers with a public audience in mind.

Science

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Maya, Remote Sensing, Archaeology, Space, Satellite Images, Guatemala

NASA, UNH Scientists Uncover Lost Maya Ruins "“ from Space

NASA and University of New Hampshire scientists are using space- and aircraft-based "remote-sensing" technology to uncover remains of the ancient Maya culture using the chemical signature of the civilization's ancient building materials.

Science

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Archaeology, bird, Bones, Shellmound, Native, Americans, Indians, Biodiversity

Early California: A Killing Field

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Pioneers were astonished by the abundance of birds and other wildlife at San Francisco Bay. Since then, people assumed such faunal wealth represented California's natural condition. That assumption is collapsing due to a study by University of Utah archaeologist Jack Broughton.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Slaves, New World, Archaeology, Teeth, 16 Th Century, Africa, Spain, African Diaspora

Archaeologists Find Evidence of Earliest African Slaves Brought to New World

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Digging in a colonial era graveyard in one of the oldest European cities in Mexico, archaeologists have found what they believe are the oldest remains of slaves brought from Africa to the New World. The remains date between the late-16th century and the mid-17th century.







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