Latest News

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

MARS, mars life, Paleontology, fossil geochemistry, Microbes

PNNL Scientist Joins the Hunt for Signs of Ancient Life on Mars

Cady_7352-s.jpg

A PNNL expert on rock chemistry and microbial life is part of a team investigating whether there has ever been life on Mars. Sherry Cady’s expertise ferreting out signs of ancient life on early Earth will help scientists decide which rock samples from the red planet to analyze.

Medicine

Channels:

Asthma

Study Shows Combination Drug Therapy for Asthma Patients Is Safe

A post-marketing safety study mandated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has shown that a combination drug therapy for the treatment of asthma is safe and effective.

Science

Channels:

Nanowires, Nanomaterials, Quantum Dot, Quantum properties, semiconductor nanostructures

Notre Dame Researchers Find Transition Point in Semiconductor Nanomaterials

nanoconductor-group_300.jpg

The breakthrough discovery establishes for the first time an answer to how a quantum dot evolves into a nanowire as its aspect ratio is made progressively larger.

Science

Channels:

New Cooling Method for Supercomputers to Save Millions of Gallons of Water

RJM_4130.jpg

A prototype cooling system for supercomputer data centers is expected to save hundreds of millions of gallons of water if widely adopted.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Trump, Immigration

University of California, Irvine Experts Available to Comment on Trump's Controversial Immigration Stance

Medicine

Channels:

Epilepsy

Newer Epilepsy Drugs Taken While Pregnant Not Associated with Lower IQs in Children

MINNEAPOLIS – Two epilepsy drugs, levetiracetam and topiramate, may not harm the thinking skills and IQs of school-age children born to women who took them while pregnant, according to a recent study. The research is published in the August 31, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the drug valproate is associated with lower IQs in children, especially at higher dosages.

Medicine

Channels:

Multiple Sclerosis (MS), MS, Neurologic Conditions, Diagnostics, Misdiagnosis, Neurology, Migraine, Fibromyalgia

Study on Multiple Sclerosis Misdiagnosis Supports Improved Education of Clinicians

A new study in the journal Neurology defines the current problems that lead patients to be misdiagnosed with MS and the possible reasons why they are misdiagnosed.

Medicine

Channels:

Pediatrics, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Behavioral Health

Big Lots and the Big Lots Foundation Commit $50 Million Transformational Gift to Nationwide Children’s Hospital

BigLotsBehavioralHealthPavilionArtistsRenderingLRG.jpg

Today, Big Lots (NYSE: BIG), together with the Big Lots Foundation, announced a $50 million transformational gift to Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Big Lots has dedicated its pledge to support Nationwide Children’s recently announced Behavioral Health expansion, including the construction of an approximately 250,000 square foot treatment and research Pavilion on the Hospital's main campus.

Science

Channels:

Cyber Security, Cyber Threats, election 2016, Technology, voter registration

Voter Confidence Will Dwindle if Russian Cyber Threats Continue

Medicine

Channels:

Roget Tsien, Nobel Laureate, Obituary, GFP, Microscopy, Cancer, Neurobiology, Biochemistry, Cell Biology

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies, Age 64

Roger Tsien, PhD, co-winner of the 2008 Nobel Prize in chemistry and professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry at University of California San Diego School of Medicine for 27 years, died August 24 in Eugene, Ore. He was 64.

Medicine

Channels:

zika virus, Insecticide, Usaid, Biology, yeast interfering insecticides, Infectious Diseases, Mosquitoes, Mosquito Borne Disease

Researchers to Pursue Novel Zika Solution

A team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame’s Eck Institute for Global Health has received a grant from the USAID to develop an insecticide to destroy Aedes aegypti larvae before the mosquitoes are able to hatch and transmit Zika.

Medicine

Channels:

Georgetown Professor Says #YellowFever Remains a Global Threat; Advocates Expanding Ring of Vaccination

Science

Channels:

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Science, Batteries, Chemistry, Catalysis, Computer Science, energy science, datasets, Materials Science, Scientific Computing, X-ray science, X-ray imaging, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Honor, Scientific Awards, Conference, Workshop

Yijin Liu Receives 2016 Spicer Award for Substantial Research Contributions Using X-Ray Microscopy

SSRL-yijin_liucopy.jpg

Yijin Liu is the winner of Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource’s (SSRL) 2016 William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award. The award is given each year to early-career X-ray scientists who perform research at SSRL, a DOE Office of Science user facility at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Science

Channels:

UF/IFAS Extension Team Wins National Award for Water Sustainability Program

BluedyemeasureHochmuth.jpg

The National Association of County Agricultural Agents (NACAA) has recognized Mace Bauer, agriculture agent with University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension Columbia County, for excellence in sustainability education aimed at young, beginning or small-scale producers.

Medicine

Channels:

Cardiology, Atrial Fibrillation, Irregular Heart Beat

Out of Sync: How Genetic Variation Can Disrupt the Heart’s Rhythm

In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk.

Medicine

Channels:

Genetics, UTHealth , Sequencing, Genome, Metabolome, Metabolites, Congestive Heart Failure, Heart Failure, eric boerwinkle , uthealth school of public health

UTHealth Researchers Identify Genetic Marker for Heart Failure

boerwinkle-web.jpg

A team of scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Baylor College of Medicine, led by Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., Richard Gibbs, Ph.D., and Bing Yu, Ph.D., have identified powerful predictors of congestive heart failure, a major cause of hospitalization and death in the United States.

Medicine

Channels:

spatial relations, Vision, Optometry, Opthalmology

Want to Hit Your Target? Good Luck, Short Stuff

Tall quarterbacks might have more going for them than a clear view over the offensive line. New research shows that tall people are better than shorter people at correctly identifying the location of targets in their middle-distance vision – between three and 20 meters away. (In football, that would be about three to 22 yards away.)

Science

Channels:

Whitehead Institute, Mitochondia, Mitochondrial Disease, mitochondrial disorders, Metabolites, Parkinson's Disease, cardiovascuar disease

Novel Method Enables Absolute Quantification of Mitochondrial Metabolites

Whitehead Institute scientists have developed a method to quickly isolate mitochondria from mammalian cells and systematically measure the concentrations of mitochondrial metabolites. Mitochondrial dysfunction is found in several disorders, including Parkinson’s disease, cardiovascular disease, and mitochondrial diseases. Until now, peering into the inner metabolic workings of these vital organelles has been very challenging.

Medicine

Channels:

NYU Dental Researcher Awarded $1.8M by NIH to Study the Phenomenon Known as the “Mitochondrial Permeability Transition” to Prevent Strokes and Heart Attacks

The National Institutes of Health have awarded Dr. Evgeny Pavlov, assistant professor of basic science and craniofacial biology at the New York University College of Dentistry , a $1.8M, five-year grant to study the phenomenon known as the “Mitochondrial Permeability Transition” to prevent strokes and heart attacks.

Life

Education

Channels:

Education, art education, social media, Learning, Teenagers, Youth, Youth at Risk, Instagram, Photography

Mobile Media and Visual Art Making Boost School Engagement

1.jpeg

Keeping teens focused on what’s happening in class rather than their electronic device is a tall order, given that 73 per cent of them have access to a smartphone — and most would prefer to be on Instagram than at school. But what if making, sharing, liking and commenting on photos was part of the curriculum instead of a forbidden activity?







Chat now!