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Science

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Chemistry, Physics, Material Science, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Molecular Physics

University of Akron Researchers Find Thin Layers of Water Can Become Ice-Like at Room Temperature

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New research by scientists at The University of Akron (UA) shows that a nanometer-thin layer of water between two charged surfaces exhibits ice-like tendencies that allow it to withstand pressures of hundreds of atmospheres. The discovery could lead to better ways to minimize friction in a variety of settings.

Medicine

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Diet and Body Weight, Exercise, Medicine & Health, Education

Standing Up for Weight Management

Alternating positions between standing and sitting while performing deskwork could make the difference in whether the thin red needle in your bathroom scale tilts to the left or the right of your goal weight.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Behavior, Demography, History, Political Science, Social And Behavioral Sciences

New UMN Study: America's Wars Take Uneven Toll

In today's wars, Americans who die or are wounded in battle are disproportionately coming from poorer parts of the country, according to a new study released this week.

Medicine

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Aging, Gerontology, Law Enforcement, Medicine And Health

New Study: A Majority of Older Adults in Jail Have Distressing Health Symptoms

More than 550,000 adults 55-years-old and older are arrested and detained every year--and that number is increasing rapidly. Yet we know very little about the special health burdens in this population. In a first of its kind study, researchers report that two-thirds of incarcerated older adults experience at least one health-related distressing symptom, such as a chronic disease, physical pain, or emotional suffering.

Science

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Alcohol, Biology, Food Science, Nutrition, Plant Science

New Research Sheds Light on How Aged Wine Gets Its Aroma

Researchers have discovered an enzyme that plays a leading role in the formation of compounds that give aged wines their sought-after aroma.

Medicine

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Aging, alzhiemer's disease, Medicine And Health, Memory & Cognitive Processes, Neurochemistry, Stress and Anxiety, Trauma Injury

First Study Examines PTSD & Cognitive Impairment in World Trade Center Responders

New research published by the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring confirms the connection between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cognitive impairment - in this case, among those who helped with search, rescue and cleanup efforts following the 2001 World Trade Center (WTC) attacks.

Science

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astronomy & astrophysics, Space And Planetary Science

Milky Way Had a Blowout Bash 6 Million Years Ago

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The center of the Milky Way galaxy is currently a quiet place where a supermassive black hole slumbers, only occasionally slurping small sips of hydrogen gas. But it wasn't always this way. A new study shows that 6 million years ago, when the first human ancestors known as hominins walked the Earth, our galaxy's core blazed forth furiously. The evidence for this active phase came from a search for the galaxy's missing mass.

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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perception and awareness, personality attitude, Social & Behavioral Sciences

Fair or Unfair? Facial Cues Influence How Social Exclusion Is Judged

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People are often excluded from social groups. As researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland report in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, whether uninvolved observers find this acceptable or not may depend on the facial appearances of those excluded. The exclusion of cold and incompetent looking people is more likely to be accepted.

Medicine

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alzheimer disease, Neurology

Vesicles That Trap Amyloid Appear to Also Contribute to Alzheimer's

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AUGUSTA, Ga. (Aug. 29, 2016) - Vesicles, fluid-filled sacs that brain cells make to trap amyloid, a hallmark of Alzheimer's, appear to also contribute to the disease, scientists report.

Science

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Materials, Semiconductors, Cement, transparent conductor, mayenite, electron anions, electride, flat panel displays, Ammonia, Catalysis

Super Cement's Secret

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Mayenite is one smart cement -- it can be turned from an insulator to a transparent conductor and back. It is also suitable for use as semiconductors in flat panel displays. The secret behind mayenite's magic is a tiny change in its chemical composition. In new work in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show how components called electron anions help to transform crystalline mayenite, also called C12A7, into semiconducting glass.

Medicine

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Drug Discovery, Mood Disorder, Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorder, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 31-Aug-2016 9:00 AM EDT

Business

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Olympics, Economics, Sport, Business, Research

How Much Did the Rio Olympics Cost?

The Rio Olympics were supposed to cost the city $3 billion, but by the end of it all, it exceeded $4.6 billion.

Science

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Agronomy, Crop Science, soil science, soil, drought, flood, climate change, Environment

Meeting Theme: Resilience Emerging From Scarcity and Abundance

Agronomists, and crop and soil scientists to meet in Phoenix this November

Medicine

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Infective Endocarditis, Opioid Abuse Epidemic, Injection Drug Users

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Sep-2016 12:05 AM EDT

Science

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Drought, Climate Change, agriculture and climate change, plants and climate change, Plants, University of Washington, Forecast Accuracy

Plants' Future Water Use Affects Long-Term Drought Estimates

Many popular long-term drought estimates ignore the fact that plants will be less thirsty as carbon dioxide goes up. Plants’ lower water use could roughly halve some current estimates for the extent of future drought, especially in central Africa and temperate Asia.

Science

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3D printing, commercial aircraft, Passenger Jet, wing, trim tool, mold, Guinness World Records, Largest solid 3D printed item, Boeing, Materials

3D Printed Tool for Building Aircraft Achieves GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS Title

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A 3D printed trim-and-drill tool, developed by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be evaluated at The Boeing Company, has received the title of largest solid 3D printed item by GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS™.

Science

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Interactive Map Shows Where Animals Will Move Under Climate Change

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The University of Washington and The Nature Conservancy have created an animated map showing where mammals, birds and amphibians are projected to move in the Western Hemisphere in response to climate change.

Medicine

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Opioid, Pain Medication

Scientists Report on Safe, Non-Addictive Opioid Analgesic in Animal Model

Since the isolation of morphine from opium in the 19th century, scientists have hoped to find a potent opioid analgesic that isn’t addictive and doesn’t cause respiratory arrest with increased doses.

Medicine

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Diagnostics, Metabolism, Cell Biology, Psychiatry

Researchers Identify Characteristic Chemical Signature for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a mysterious and maddening condition, with no cure or known cause. But researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, using a variety of techniques to identify and assess targeted metabolites in blood plasma, have identified a characteristic chemical signature for the debilitating ailment and an unexpected underlying biology: It is similar to the state of dauer, and other hypometabolic syndromes like caloric restriction, diapause and hibernation.

Medicine

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Astrobiology, Exoplanet, exoplanetary atmospheres, Proxima Centauri b

New Discovery Proxima B Is in Host Star's Habitable Zone — but Could It Really Be Habitable?

The world's attention is now on Proxima Centauri b, a possibly Earth-like planet orbiting the closest star, 4.22 light-years away. The planet's orbit is just right to allow liquid water on its surface, needed for life. But could it in fact be habitable? If so, the planet evolved very different than Earth, say researchers at the University of Washington-based Virtual Planetary Laboratory where astronomers, geophysicists, climatologists, evolutionary biologists and others team to study how distant planets might host life.







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